Abstracts

Below is a list of Parallel Sessions, Poster Sessions, and Symposia. This is a preliminary list and is subject to change. The complete program will be available before May 30.

Names followed by an asterisk (*) are not attending the World Conference, but they collaborated on the work.

If you have any questions, please contact headquarters@world-gifted.org.

135 ‘Self-propelled learning’: facilitating talent development in highly able individuals on the autism spectrum
Parallel Session, 2e

The process of self-propelled learning was identified and investigated as part of a larger grounded theory study to explore talent development in highly able individuals on the autism spectrum. The study design uses grounded theory methodology (GTM) to analyze responses from 156 participants (adults with an autism diagnosis, parents, teachers, psychologists, mentors/coaches) from Australia, North America, and Europe. The results demonstrate that self-propelled learning is the most important process contributing to the outcome of asymmetrical thriving (high levels of achievement alongside coping with challenges associated with an uneven profile of strengths and weaknesses).

Susan Wade
Monash University
Australia

Susan Wade is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Monash University. Her research focuses on gifted individuals on the autism spectrum. She has worked as a teaching associate at Monash University in gifted education and is also an experienced secondary teacher. She has given seminars and staff professional development sessions relating to education, giftedness and the autism spectrum. Susan has been awarded the Monash University / Herald Sun Victorian Graduate Teacher of the Year, a Creative Innovation Asia Pacific Innovation Leader scholarship, an ASfAR / APEX Autism Trust Award and the ASfAR Margot Prior Prize.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of the Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

94 “From the horse’s mouth” – student voice in secondary school – a student perspective
Parallel Session, Advocacy

Authentic student voice and leadership is being developed within the academically selective secondary cohort at Nossal High School in Melbourne. The school’s creation in 2010 provided a unique opportunity to build a strong culture and ethos around authentic student voice and input into the development and evolution of the school. Two powerful student leaders will present an inspiring student perspective about this which may surprise and challenge “adult” perceptions. More importantly they will convince their audience of the advantages, value, and imperative to enable stronger student voice and input within our schools and the wider community.

Thomas Velican
Nossal High School
Australia

Thomas is the immediate past president of the Nossal High SRC. He completed Year 12 in 2016 and balanced his studies with heavy involvement in developing student voice and student leadership within the school and the wider community. He has received numerous awards for his work as an advocate for student voice, most recently winning the “Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority” (VCAA) 2016 VCE Leadership Award. He is a member of the VicSRC Executive, the City of Casey Youth Action Committee and has been called on to consult with the Education Minister. He is a passionate, thoughtful and articulate speaker.

Abel Muller
Nossal High School
Australia

Abel is a Year 12 student at Nossal High School – one of four Victorian Government academically selective high schools. He is the elected School Captain for 2017, after having heavy involvement in the development of the award winning Nossal High School Student Representative Council. He balances academic studies at a high level, with a broad range of co-curricular activities and has been a part of the student leadership team who advocate strongly and effectively for authentic student voice both within the school and the broader community.


 

 

9 “You’re gifted, why are you here?” Counselling the gifted and talented.
Parallel Session, Guidance

Research indicates that, in general, School Counsellors have very little knowledge of the affective, developmental and career counselling concerns of gifted students. This limits their ability to provide effective counselling. Due to their unique characteristics as learners, gifted students have specific counselling issues which often need to be addressed. In addition, they must deal with “normal” twenty-first century counselling issues, often at an earlier age than their age peers. Both teachers and school counsellors will benefit from this presentation, which summarises issues pertaining to counselling gifted and talented students, then provides suggestions as to the most effective methodology.

Wendy Stewart
Dara School for the Gifted
Australia

Wendy Stewart has a solid background in Gifted Education. She has worked with gifted students in schools for over twenty years, has a Masters in Gifted Education and has held positions on both state and national gifted associations. Wendy also holds qualifications in Counselling because she was unable to find a school counsellor who could assist in counselling gifted students. Nor could she find assistance in counselling gifted students from outside of the education system. So, she started her own counselling business; in addition to working part-time as School Counsellor at Dara School, she counsels gifted children and adults.


 

 

136 1 + 1 + 4 = Thousands of Kids
Parallel Session, Programming

It is vital that the needs of the gifted child are met, for the sake of the child and for the benefit of society. The New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education provides a suite of services nationwide to support the gifted child, their teachers, and their families. This session will outline the journey of the Centre, the development of its curriculum, and the establishment of sector-wide programmes ranging from early years to secondary. Participants will see the benefits of specialist educators, collaboration between educational communities, and the combination of like-minds together in responsive and differentiated learning environments.

Deborah Walker
New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education
New Zealand

Deb has worked in gifted education since 2002 holding various roles, including Specialist Teacher, Associate Principal and CEO. She is passionate about leading positive change and has played an integral part in the development of the NZCGE Curriculum and the Identification Process for students. Deb has a Masters of Education (hons) with a focus on gifted, through Massey University and a Graduate Diploma in Not-For-Profit Management Business Management (hons) from Unitec. Although her current role is one of leadership, management and advocacy, working primarily with adults, she jumps at the chance to work with our students, both present and alumni.


 

 

331 20 Years Later: Revisiting Attitudes of Adolescent Gifted Girls and Boys Towards Education, Achievement, and the Future
Parallel Session, Guidance

Gender differences in career aspirations and outcomes has been an ongoing interest to researchers and educators, including the field of gifted education. In 1989, Reis, Callahan, and Goldsmith published findings from a study of intellectually gifted students’ attitudes towards future educational options, career choices, family, and school achievement. Their research also examined gender differences in gifted students’ attitudes towards education, career, and family. This presentation will report about a study of gifted adolescents attending the same program two decades later, in which they were administered a questionnaire with many of the same items included in the original research.

Jane Jarvis
Flinders University
Australia

Dr Jane Jarvis is a Senior Lecturer in Education at Flinders University, where she teaches and conducts research in special education and gifted education. She received her PhD in Educational Psychology (Gifted Education) from the University of Virginia, and her professional experience includes work as a school counsellor, teacher and administrator in programs for gifted students.


 

 

298 A Case Study: A Comparison of Identification and Assessment Processes Between Second and Fourth Grade Students Enrolled in Turkish Science and Art Centers (SACs): From the Experts’ Perceptions
Parallel Session, Identification

SACs are the unique formal institutions in Turkey which were founded by government since 2006 as an intervention challenge for the special needs of gifted students. There is a debate among Turkish professionals that indicates some concerns about whether the students’ identification and assessment should start from the first or fourth grades. Last year the National Ministry of Education decided that identification should start in the first grade instead of fourth grade. There is not any study showing the scientific necessaries about this issue to be able to solve the debate.

Abdullah Eker
Necmettin Erbakan Unversity
Turkey

I m research assistant and doctorate student in Necmettin Erbakanb Universty. Bachelor Degree from İstanbul University and Master Degree from Anadolu University about Gifted Education in Special Education Department. Now continue researchs and studies in the same area.


 

 

273 A Cross-Cultural Comparison of leading School Models for Engaging Intellectually Able Students: USA and Australia
Symposium, G&T

Four academic schooling models providing for gifted and highly able students will be presented by leading educators with programs subsequently compared and contrasted. The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science, Kentucky, USA, is a residential school for high school juniors and seniors with access to Western Kentucky University. Three leading Australian government schools, Mac.Robertson Girls, a selective high school (Y9-12), Box Hill High School, co-educational for students Years 7-12, with a Select Entry Accelerated Learning (SEAL) Program (Y7-10), and Nossal High School, the first fully academically selective co-educational secondary school (Y9-12) in Victoria.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of the Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.

Julia Roberts
Western Kentucky University
United States

Julia Link Roberts, the Mahurin Professor of Gifted Studies at Western Kentucky University, is Executive Director of The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky and The Center for Gifted Studies. Dr. Roberts is on the Executive Committee of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children and president of The Association for the Gifted. She received the 2011 Acorn Award as outstanding professor at a Kentucky four-year university, first NAGC David Belin Advocacy Award, 2012 NAGC Distinguished Service Award, and 2011 William T. Nallia Award for innovative leadership from the Kentucky Association for School Administrators.

Toni Meath
The Mac. Robertson Girls High School
Australia

Dr Toni Meath is a graduate of Sydney University and The University of Melbourne, Toni’s work in education innovation has been published both nationally and internationally. Toni is currently Principal of The Mac.Robertson Girls’ High School, Victoria and her portfolio across many schools has been one of leading a strong performance and development culture and as a strong advocate for gifted learners.

Kate Mitchell
Box Hill High School
Australia

Kate Mitchell, [M.Ed(gifted ed), B.Comm., Dip. Ed] has been an educator in Victorian State Government schools for 20+ years, taking on school leadership roles including curriculum development, student welfare and coordination of the largest high school Select Entry Acceleration Learning (SEAL) program. In 2007 she became the first female Principal at Box Hill High School. In 2011, she was seconded to the position of Acting Regional Network leader. In 2013, she was invited to join the Victorian Department of Education’s Gifted and Talented Expert Reference Group. She is a strong advocate for all students including gifted and talented students.

Roger Page
Nossal High School
Australia

Roger began teaching in 1980 after completing a Bachelor of Arts, Monash University and a Graduate Diploma of Education, Melbourne University. Working initially in the Technical School division he was heavily involved in leadership roles in student welfare and teacher professional development in several schools. He developed an interest and involvement in integrated curriculum and gifted education early in his career, and has been involved in the design and planning of several new schools. Roger is the foundation principal of Nossal High School, the first purpose built coeducational government selective entry school in Victoria.


 

 

179 A Holistic Model for Serving the Needs of Identified Gifted Students
Parallel Session, G&T

Presenters will describe a holistic program model to frame conversation about the best and most comprehensive ways to ensure the needs of identified gifted students are being met. This visual model addresses the importance of four programming areas: 1) academic growth, 2) social/emotional support, 3) university and career planning, and 4) parent and teacher engagement. Participants will explore best practices for designing and delivering comprehensive gifted program services within each component. Participants will have the chance to engage with each other and will take away strategies and ideas that will empower them to create cutting-edge programming in their schools.

Kathryn Grubbs
University of Washington
United States

Kathryn Grubbs, MA, LMHC is the Academy Adviser at the Robinson Center. Prior to her current position she worked as a middle school/high school counselor for 8 years, most recently at a residential high school for gifted students outside of Chicago, Illinois. Besides working in schools, she has experience in college counseling, inpatient and outpatient mental health centers, homeless shelters, and domestic violence programs. Kathryn has presented at NAGC, NCSSSMST, SENG, and WAETAG and provides professional development locally to parents, teachers, counselors and administrators.

Nancy Hertzog
University of Washington
United States

Dr. Nancy Hertzog is Professor in the area of Educational Psychology at the University of Washington, and the Director of the Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars. She has an extensive background in gifted education and expertise on curriculum differentiation and development. From 1995-2010 she directed University Primary School at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books, several chapters, and has published in the Journal of Curriculum Studies, Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Roeper Review, Teaching Exceptional Children, Early Childhood Research and Practice, and Young Exceptional Children.


 

 

119 A Model for the Education of Gifted Leaners- LWIS-City International School-Lebanon
Parallel Session, G&T

Lebanon is a small country in the Middle East with high literacy level among children. In the 1997 curriculum reform, special education was introduced to the curriculum, which catered to the needs of children with learning difficulties and disabilities. The needs of gifted children were not mentioned. Although there have been some attempts, officially, there are no well-rounded programs catering to the gifted population. As a community, LWIS-CiS understands the vital role educators play in developing critical thinking in future citizens and catering to gifted learners. The development of Gifted and Talented Clubs is the result of this knowledge.

Mira Alameddine
LWIS-City International School
Lebanon

Mira Alameddine has two Masters: Education and Philosophy; she has finalized her PhD in Education-Gifted Teaching and Learning at the Doctorate School of Literature, Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lebanese University. Currently, she is the coordinator of the Gifted and Talented Program which she developed and is running at the LWIS-City International School, DT in Beirut-Lebanon. She is a consultant in Gifted and Talented curriculum and teaching/learning and is a certified assessor for gifted and talented learners.

Nather Simhari
LWIS-City International School
Lebanon

Nather Simhari has a PhD in Mathematics. He is the principal of LWIS-City International School which he founded in 2003. He is a co-founder of the School Development Consultants (SDC), which runs the LWIS school network.


 

 

10 A Multi-Modal Approach in Teaching Chemical Bonding using the Parallel Curriculum Model
Parallel Session, Programming

Cedar Girls’ Secondary School started restructuring the school curriculum using the Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM) as a framework in 2014. The first adapted Chemistry unit on Chemical Bonding was designed in 2015 to investigate if this approach can help heighten interest and deepen the learning of concepts in Chemistry. Based on feedback from the study, the lesson materials were further modified and improved for subsequent batches of students in 2016.

Li Kheang Koo
Ministry of Education Singapore
Singapore

Mdm Koo Li Kheang is a senior teacher in an all girls’ secondary school (aged 13-16) in Singapore which takes in the top 10% of the primary school (aged 7-12) cohort. She has been actively involved in developing curriculum materials for the Cedar Integrated Programme in the subject of Chemistry since the programme started in 2013. A winner of the 2016 Outstanding Science Teacher’s Award, Mdm Koo is deeply passionate about developing an enriching curriculum for high ability learners. She has shared her teaching experiences at local and international conferences in her home country

Wei Quan Daniel Soh*

Daniel is the subject head of chemistry in an all girls’ secondary school (aged 13-16) in Singapore which takes in the top 10% of the primary school (aged 7-12) cohort. He has been actively involved in developing the curriculum materials for Year 1 to 4 students for the Cedar Integrated Programme in the subject of Chemistry since the programme started in 2013. Daniel is deeply passionate about developing an enriching curriculum for high ability learners and has presented in local and international conferences to share his teaching experiences.


 

 

129 A Narrative journey of a profoundly gifted student in mainstream schooling
Poster, Diversity

This research explores a profoundly gifted student, Ruby, narrating her story to produce new knowledge to enhance how teachers engage with profoundly gifted children in education. Through these stories, it is envisaged she will come to understand her experience and share her school experiences with others in a holistic form, which is not ‘fractured’ by researchers. Stories about profoundly gifted students are not often heard. The researcher attempts to demonstrate that in telling Ruby’s story, there is more than one reality, beyond the beliefs and perspectives of educational professionals.

Kylie Booker
AISM
Malaysia

Kylie Booker has been leading in gifted education for the past 25 years. She was a previous Australian delegate to the World Council and has presented at a number of World Conferences. She is currently in Malaysia working for Taylor’s Education Group as a Director of Curriculum and Innovation. Presently she is completing her Doctorate research at Flinders University.


 

 

316 A process oriented Talent Development model for guiding gifted children
Parallel Session, Guidance

Self-knowledge is fundamental in the complex and ongoing process of talent development, which is influenced by many factors (personal characteristics and environmental factors). It is important and challenging for gifted children to discover how it is possible to invest in their own development in a way that fits them, given the available opportunities in their specific context. A process oriented model of talent development has been developed as a means to improve communication and mutual understanding, and to gain deeper understanding of supportive and hindering factors, which can be used to guide and counsel gifted children.

Desirée Houkema
SLO
Netherlands

Curriculum developer, Psychologist, Specialist in Gifted Education & Talent Development. Working for the National Information Centre for Education and Talent Development at the Netherlands Institute for Curriculum Development (SLO)

Nora Steenbergen-Penterman
SLO

Curriculum developer, Specialist in Gifted Education & Talent Development. Working for the National Information Centre for Education and Talent Development at the Netherlands Institute for Curriculum Development (SLO)

Yvonne Janssen
SLO

Curriculum developer, Specialist in Gifted Education & Talent Development. Working for the National Information Centre for Education and Talent Development at the Netherlands Institute for Curriculum Development (SLO)


 

 

106 A Student Perspective Snapshot of Life at James Ruse Agricultural High School, Sydney, Australia
Parallel Session, Advocacy

James Ruse Agricultural High School is a beacon in our education system, as a school for the exceptionally and highly gifted. Programs exist to assist students to reach their potential in academia and to promote positive wellbeing, develop leadership skills and an awareness of global and social justice issues in a culturally diverse context. Students excel in various fields of endeavour as they are provided with a range of opportunities within the curriculum and in the extra-curricular environment. The school has achieved first place in the NSW HSC merit list for the past 21 years.

Sandra Fernandez
James Ruse Agricultural high School
Australia

Sandra is a Science /Chemistry teacher who has been teaching in the NSW Public Education system for 30 years in both comprehensive and selective high schools. Sandra has convened and facilitated a variety of programs for GAT students at these schools and advocated for GATS education for many years. She was the recipient of a NSW Premier’s Scholarship in Science Education in 2006 and a BHP-Billiton Science Teacher Award in 2008. Sandra currently teaches Science/Chemistry and is a Year Advisor at James Ruse Agricultural High School.

Megan Connors
James Ruse Agricultural High School
Australia

Megan Connors is the Principal of James Ruse Agricultural High School. Her passions lie in ensuring that gifted students are provided with the education and opportunities they deserve. Her main goal is ensuring the social, emotional, physical and academic needs of gifted students are met in a happy, dynamic and healthy environment. Megan completed her Masters in Educational Leadership at UNSW in 2014. Megan’s proudest achievements as Principal is the establishment of a Creative and Performing Arts Faculty and a curriculum based on acceleration and enrichment to promote the development of successful, balanced and happy students.


 

 

96 A study on the use of formative feedback and growth portfolio to enhance self-regulatory capacity amongst high-ability learners.
Poster, G&T

This case study examines how formative feedback may help in enhancing the capacity of high-ability learners (HALs) to self-regulate in the learning of a second language. Despite self-regulatory learning (SRL) being examined in numerous educational settings and being proven to be effective in facilitating learning processes, few empirical studies have been conducted in the context of second language learning, specifically amongst HALs (Laine, 2010; Weinberg, 2011). Based on a large body of research on HALs, these individuals exhibit traits of self-regulation (Risemberg & Zimmerman, 1992) and these skills could be stretched further through self-regulatory classroom strategies.

Rohaida Ismail
NUS `HIGH SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS & SCIENCE
Singapore

I have been teaching Malay Language (secondary level)for the past 18 years. My passion in teaching has always been in developing and enhancing the Malay Language curriculum and assessments to cater to the needs of my gifted learners. My philosophy is; the teacher may play a key role in the creation of effective learning environments, but at the end of the day, learning is optimised only when students takes full ownership of their learning.


 

 

335 A Systematic Review and Knowledge Framework for Assessment and Identification Tools in the Early Years
Parallel Session, Identification

A critical, often neglected area of gifted education provision is the identification of its emergence in the early years. During the past two decades, various approaches to the identification of a gifted learning capacity and talented outcomes have developed, seemingly independently of each other. This presentation offers a systematic synthesis of these approaches. It uses an explicit framework based on educational psychology dimensions of knowledge to review and evaluate evidence-based contemporary identification practices during the past 20 years. The presentation uses the findings to inform practical applications in early childhood settings and to indicate future assessment directions.

John Munro
Australian Catholic University
Australia

Dr Munro is Professor of Educational Psychology and Exceptional Learning in the Faculty of Arts and Education, Australian Catholic University. He is a qualified primary and secondary teacher and a psychologist. His teaching and research interests are in gifted education, literacy and mathematics learning and learning difficulties, instructional leadership, school improvement and learning internationally. He has written state and national curricula in Australia, and produced a range of teacher resources and professional learning materials for the state and independent school systems. He has provided consultancy to several international education projects including the Aga Khan Academies and the International Baccalaureate.


 

 

275 A Tale of Two Es: Case studies of twice-exceptional students’ growth in an all-gifted school
Parallel Session, 2e

Twice-exceptional students often find themselves doubly uncomfortable in typical mixed-ability classrooms, where their disabilities may hide their gifts, or their gifts may hide their disabilities. At an American independent all-gifted primary school, twice-exceptional students can have both learning needs addressed simultaneously, with positive changes to their learning, behavior, and self-concept. Through two case studies — a behavioral turnaround and an academic one — we will share what practical steps and programming choices allowed these highly-able twice-exceptional children to make remarkable progress in just one school year.

Kimm Doherty

United States

Kimm Doherty is a Master Teacher and Language Arts Instructor for 4th-8th grades at The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. Ms. Doherty, who has a Master’s degree in Gifted Education from the University of Connecticut, has also held multiple statewide leadership roles in gifted education. She particularly loves teaching elementary students because of their openness to new ideas, and integrating content from multiple disciplines is such a natural part of learning for them. Her deep passion for gifted education along with her years of classroom experience make her an invaluable “lead learner” at Grayson.

Melissa Bilash
The Grayson School
United States

Melissa Bilash founded The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. She serves on NAGC’s Legislative and Special Schools Committees, and with her co-founder Jennifer Nance, co-authored NAGC’s 2016 publication, A Guide to State Policies in Gifted Education (2nd ed.). One of only 78 federally-trained Special Education Advocates, she has testified before Congress and met with Senators, Representatives, and U.S. Dept. of Education staffers regarding best practices in gifted education. Ms. Bilash has been awarded Special Congressional Recognition for her work, and in 2016 was named her state’s inaugural “Innovator Award” winner at their annual conference.


 

 

384 A Toolbox for Rigorous Identification Preschool – Year 12
Parallel Session, Identification

The identification of gifted students can potentially be problematic. This session will demonstrate how to cast the net wide to find all potentially gifted students, including those who may be under-represented. The results of single-instrument (or even psychometric) testing, if conditions on a particular day are not conducive to the student, could result in overlooked cases with unfortunate implications. Collecting a body of evidence to support your decision need not be a challenge if certain steps are taken. Our focus in this session is to take you through those steps and provide you with the necessary tools.

Angela Foulds-Cook
The Southport School
Australia

Over the past 3 decades Angela has worked with students, teachers and parents in Australia, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore and USA. She has developed gifted programs and presented at international and state conferences on giftedness advancing educational and creative outcomes for gifted, 2e and under-represented students. As an Associate Dean of Learning and Teaching and Head of Gifted Education at The Southport School, she facilitates gifted programs years 7-12 and is teacher mentor for cluster and accelerated classes. Angela was recognised as a finalist in the QLD College of Teachers Excellence in Leadership and Teaching awards.

Jasna Poeszus
The Southport Preparatory School
Australia

Jasna’s 29-year career in Education spans across a wide spectrum of learners. Curriculum adjustments and the provision of quality teaching and learning experiences that engage students, has been the driving force behind her contributions to this field. Qualified in both special education and gifted education, Jasna has held a number of positions including Assistant Principal Curriculum as well as Education Consultant in NSW across all Educational Sectors, State, Independent and Catholics Schools. Jasna has presented at a number of state conferences. She is currently Coordinator of Gifted & Talented Programs P-6 at The Southport Preparatory School.


 

 

150 Abstract Voices of parents: Sharing evaluation of an education response to young gifted children
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Two essential strands in education programming for young gifted children are providing a satisfying level of learning and evaluating the program as a basis for ongoing planning. In a one-day-school program which explicitly aims to extend rich and complex thinking by young gifted children, there are implicit goals to validate a healthy sense of self, resilience in facing challenges, and extend their social skills. Including parental voice as part of the evaluation and the planning process impacted on these goals. This paper will report on the evaluation process and discuss the nature and efficacy of parental feedback for ongoing planning.

Carolyn Giles
Born to Soar
Australia

Carolyn Giles an experienced and innovative educator, founded Born to Soar in 2013, providing educational learning opportunities for gifted students through Centres for Gifted and Talented (One Day Schools) located in Melbourne, virtual classrooms reaching gifted students across Australia and Asia and professional learning for teachers in gifted education. Currently holding positions as Talent Development Coordinator at Carey Baptist Grammar School; the Vice-President of the Victorian Association for Gifted and Talented Children and the Victorian head of Future Problem Solving Australia; she is a parent of gifted children and passionately advocates for gifted families and the teachers who support them.

Anne Grant
Deakin University
Australia

Anne has taught in the early childhood field for many years. She has worked with children who have a range of abilities from those identified as gifted through to children with severe developmental delay. She lectures at university level in gifted and early childhood education, at both undergraduate and post graduate level. Anne co-authored the DEECD online Resource “Making a Difference for Young Gifted and Talented Children” and is currently involved in writing on the educational needs of young gifted children.


 

 

28 Accelerating Gifted Indigenous Students: A Blueprint for the Future of Gifted Education
Symposium, Diversity

Gifted Indigenous students suffer from under-identification, under-programming, and underachievement. More than 43% of gifted American Indian and Alaska Native students are unidentified, many school districts failing to identify even a single student. Strength-based instructional programming, in tandem with culturally-responsive content, finds those gifted kids and accelerates them into double-digit percentile learning growth and mastery. Breaking with the notion that achievement defines giftedness, such culturally-responsive instruction creates a blueprint for all GT identification and programming. This symposium includes videoclips from actual classroom lessons, latest published research results supporting these instructional best practices, and plenty of time for audience interaction.

Steven Haas
Indigenous Students Leap Ahead (ISLA)
United States

Steven Haas is a passionate advocate for strength-based, culturally responsive instructional strategies that are respectful of the traditional tribal ways of teaching, learning, and knowing for Native American children. He works with tribal and public school districts on/off reservations to train teachers in ISLA’s Seven Instructional Hoops©. He has presented new research results on gifted Native American children at numerous national conferences. Recent publications include “Teaching to their Strengths: Good Medicine for Native American Education” in Gifted Students of Color Around the World and “Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children” in Applied Practice for Educators of Gifted and Able Learners.

Jerry Lassos (Tongva)
Indigenous Students Leap Ahead (ISLA)
United States

Dubbed a “troubled kid from LA turned veteran teacher” by the local newspaper, Jerry Lassos has presented nationally and at the state and local levels. Jerry has been both a GT Center Teacher and GT Resource Consultant in Jefferson County Public Schools and Indian Resource Specialist for Denver Public Schools. He is a member of the Tongva (Gabrielino) mission tribe of Los Angeles. He recently had the opportunity to visit the normally closed San Nicolas Island, part of his tribal ancestral homelands. This life changing opportunity has refueled his passion as an advocate for educational equity.

Andrea Berghoff
Colorado Department of Education
United States

Andrea Berghoff is a Right 4 Rural Consultant in the Exceptional Student Services Unit of the Colorado Department of Education. Her geographic area of responsibility encompasses San Juan BOCES (Board of Cooperative Educational Services), Santa Fe Trail BOCES, and San Luis Valley BOCES. She is a researcher and author on gifted and talented education among indigenous peoples of southwest Colorado (“Southern Ute Cultural Perceptions of Giftedness: Implications for Identifying and Serving Diverse Gifted Students”).

Norma Hafenstein
University of Denver
United States

Dr. Hafenstein is the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair for Gifted Education, Teaching and Learning Sciences Department, Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver, founded the Ricks Center for Gifted Children, a PS-8 school, in 1984, and founded the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, 1997. Dr. Hafenstein is recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented and the Outstanding Service to the University Award from the University of Denver. She is Co-PI for the Right4Rural Project, a Javits federally-funded effort to increase identification of and service to underrepresented populations in rural Colorado.

Kristina Hesbol
University of Denver
United States

Kristina A. Hesbol is Assistant Professor in the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Department at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. She has taught preK-graduate school, has served as a principal of three multi-lingual, multi-cultural schools, coordinated school improvement for a diverse school district, and served as a district Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Hesbol earned her Ph.D. at Loyola University (Chicago), and currently serves as a member of the Right4Rural Research Team, examining the impact of school and district leaders on the identification of culturally and linguistically diverse rural students.


 

 

24 Acceleration: A Prominent Curriculum Option for Gifted Students
Parallel Session, G&T

The research supporting acceleration as a program option for gifted students and its positive outcomes are well documented. Acceleration is an educational strategy that ensures a gifted student is given a level of educational instruction commensurate with their abilities and sufficiently challenging to stimulate, maintain, and sustain academic and affective growth. Acceleration needs to be well planned, implemented, and reviewed in light of the best available data. This symposium will give an overview of Holland Park State School’s acceleration process, highlight research evidence, consider issues, and analyse case studies of acceleration.

Gail Young
Holland Park State School
Australia

Gail Young has a Masters Degree in Special Education( gifted students). Gail is the Gifted Education Mentor at Holland Park State School managing the sub committee for acceleration. Gail is a member of the central committee of the Queensland Association for Gifted and Talented Children and is the Qld representative for the Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented (AAEGT) Gail advocates at the local, state and national level to identify and make curriculum options for gifted students. Gail leads the school’s Gifted and Talented Education Committee that implements Qld Government gifted education policy and ACARA policies.

Kathlyn Dyer*

Kathlyn has a Bachelor of Education degree with first class Honours and has completed a Certificate of Effective Practice in Gifted Education (REACH Education NZ). Kathlyn has completed the A.G. Q.T.P Core, Extension and Specialising modules in Gifted Education. Kathlyn has taught all grades from grade one to Six, including multi ages of those grades. Kathlyn is one of the founding members of the Holland Park State School Gifted and Talented Committee. Kathlyn is a receiving teacher for gifted students and attends case study meetings for students nominated for acceleration. Kathlyn has a gifted child and twice exceptional grand child.

Neil Adams
Holland Park State School
Australia

Neil has a Bachelor of Education. Neil has completed the Australian Government Quality Teacher Program Core, Extension and Specialising modules in Gifted Education. He is a founding member of the Gifted and Talented Committee at Holland Park State School. Neil has been a receiving teacher for subject and whole year level accelerated students. He has provided mentoring and coaching in Philosophy, S.T.E.M. and Mathematics to gifted students.


 

 

264 Access and Equity in Gifted Education: Paradigm Shift and Professional Development
Parallel Session, Diversity

Presenters will share how one state in the United States is addressing the under-representation of students from diverse populations in gifted education through legislation, advocacy, policy, and professional development. The impact of the paradigm shift from identifying a child as gifted to identifying which children need accelerated or advanced services allows school districts to design an array of services that meet individual students’ needs. Designing and implementing an array of services requires comprehensive professional development. Presenters will share newly designed accessible, on-line professional development modules that address access and equity in gifted education.

Nancy Hertzog
University of Washington
United States

Dr. Nancy Hertzog is Professor in the area of Educational Psychology at the University of Washington, and the Director of the Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars. She has an extensive background in gifted education and expertise on curriculum differentiation and development. From 1995-2010 she directed University Primary School at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books, several chapters, and has published in the Journal of Curriculum Studies, Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Roeper Review, Teaching Exceptional Children, Early Childhood Research and Practice, and Young Exceptional Children.

Jann Leppien*

Jann Leppien, Ph.D. is an associate professor and the Endowed Chair in Gifted Education at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington. The Center focuses on providing educators with a specialty endorsement or master’s degree in gifted education, engaging in research, providing professional development, and collaborating with other agencies striving to improve services for advanced students. She has served on the NAGC Board of Directors and is coauthor of The Multiple Menu Model: A Practical Guide for Developing Differentiated Curriculum, The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge High-Ability Students and series editor for content related PCM books.

Jody Hess*

Ms. Jody Hess is Project Director, HiCapPLUS Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Education Program. She directed Highly Capable Programs for Tacoma Schools, including program development, evaluation, professional development, grant management, and reporting. She led Project NET-Nurturing Exceptional Talent classroom-based instructional model of talent development, which increased participation of students living in poverty, students with disabilities, and English learners in Tacoma’s Highly Capable Programs. Ms. Hess is Program Supervisor, Special Programs in Washington State. Ms. Hess has been gifted program manager and teacher, as well as instructor in Specialty Endorsement for Center for Gifted Education, Whitworth University, Spokane, Washington.


 

 

227 Accounting for Creativity: English teachers’ understandings of creative practice across different educational contexts
Poster, Creativity

This poster explores the findings of research about English teachers’ understandings of creativity and creative practice, conducted across different education sectors, including supplementary gifted and talented programs. A narrative inquiry based approach was used to generate the data, as teachers were encouraged to speak about creative experiences, reflect upon their teaching practice, and identify what they considered to be examples of creativity in their students. Teachers discussed their views of creativity and it’s place in education, as well as the effects of assessment and the limitations and opportunities for creativity in different contexts.

Narelle Wood
Monash University
Australia

Narelle Wood is currently working on her PhD specifically focussing on teacher understandings of creativity and creative practises. Having an unusual combination of Science and English methodologies has resulted in some incredible opportunities for Narelle to follow her passion to work creatively, including teaching in Cambodia, leading teacher training workshops, and teaching workshops for gifted and talented primary school students throughout Australia and internationally. Narelle has worked as Head of English and Literacy and as a sessional teacher in the Education Faculty at Monash University. Narelle also consults with schools on curriculum design and implementing different learning and assessment strategies.


 

 

338 ADHD and the Gifted Child: Dual Exceptionality or Paradox?
Parallel Session, 2e

There exists a pervasive belief that behaviours which may be characteristic of ADHD in some children can be explained by other means in gifted children: “He is just bored and acts out” or “He is just lazy.” Although such behaviours in gifted children do not necessarily equate to a diagnosis of ADHD, the possibility should not be automatically discounted. By seeking a deeper understanding of ADHD through current research, examining the sub-types (or presentations), understanding the impact ADHD can have on the child’s life and learning, as well as consulting with professionals, one can determine the factors at play for individual children.

Melinda Gindy
Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented
Australia

Melinda Gindy is a music teacher (B.arts, Grad.dip.ed, Grad.cert.gifted.ed, M.M.T.A) with past experience teaching across both primary and secondary classroom settings. She has also directed and taught in a private music school since 2001. Her recent post graduate studies delivered a free evidence-based resource for music teachers, www.2emusicstudio.com, focussed on meeting the needs of twice-exceptional children. Melinda is the co-founder and president of GFSG Inc., the NSW State gifted association. She represents NSW on the AAEGT, as well as serving as the national associations’ Vice-President. Melinda is on the Local Organising Committee of the 22nd Biennial World Conference.


 

 

329 Alternative Education Options for Gifted and Twice Exceptional Children
Poster, School Alternatives

For many years, pathways have existed for gifted and twice-exceptional children to pursue alternative education options, such as Beach High School (http://beachhigh.education/) in California, USA, and the proliferation of micro-schools catering to 2e children (Rivera 2016). Yet it is only very recently that such options have become more widespread in Australia. This presentation will posit that with the alternative education options, the stark divide between homeschooling and school has been replaced with a broad spectrum of different options. Many of these options, such as online remote learning, have become a real possibility in recent years.

Kathleen Humble
Gifted Homeschoolers Forum
Australia

Kathleen Humble is an Australian writer, mathematician and homeschooling mum to two twice-exceptional children. She writes regularly at ‘Gluten-Free Mum’, AKA Yellow Readis, about profoundly gifted and twice exceptional issues. Kathleen is passionate about alternative education for gifted / twice exceptional students and advocates and supports families with gifted / twice exceptional children through her work with GHF in Australia. She is currently working with GHF Press on publishing about the history and consequences of gifted / twice-exceptional myths (due 2017).


 

 

280 An Analysis of Student-to-Student Discussion Posts in an Online Graduate Gifted Education Class
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

Focusing on the results of a qualitative study about the connections between the levels of thinking reflected by student-to-student posts in an online graduate gifted education course, this session addresses the question: What are the characteristic of student-to-student online posts? Edward DeBono’s Six Thinking Hats were used to classify the student posts. Posts made by the students to each other were less likely to be characterized by White Hat Thinking than posting to the instructor’s discussion prompt. The main types of thinking represented by the student posts were Yellow Hat Thinking, Red Hat Thinking with Green Hat Thinking ranking third.

Joyce Miller
Texas A&M University-Commerce
United States

Dr. Joyce E. Kyle Miller is a professor at Texas A&M University-Commerce in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Miller developed the graduate Gifted Education program and teaches the online courses. In addition, Dr. Miller is a Board Member and Board Secretary for the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented. College Tours,Career Forums, ACT and SAT Practice Tests are some of the services Dr. Miller organizes for gifted students in Garland, Texas and surrounding communities. Research emphases include gifted curriculum and instruction, cultural diversity, technology, and online instruction.


 

 

313 An Exploratory Study About the Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children
Poster, Social/Emotional

The purpose of the current study was to explore the social and emotional development of gifted children. To accomplish this purpose, the study explored theoretically the concept of and the variables related to gifted children’s social and emotional development. Based on the previous research and theoretical considerations, the study suggested the educational tasks for improving gifted students’ social and emotional development: Improving their autonomy, making and sustaining successfully their interpersonal relationships (the quality of relationships to parents, teachers, and friends), harmonizing their achievement adjustment with their process adjustment, and facilitating their self-esteem.

Ehun-Shik Moon
Kangwon National University
South Korea

I am teaching educational psychology and Curriculum to preservice kindergarten teachers in Kangwon National Uninversity, korea. My main research areas are gifted education, self-determined theory, and psychological well-being.


 

 

373 An innovative pedagogic model that integrates scientific enrichment with intra-inter personal dimension to promote fulfillment of the potential of gifted students
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Scholars have realized for a long time that giftedness by itself is no guarantee for success and fulfillment of early personal potential in adulthood. The main question is how school education may contribute to gifted youngsters to transform their early potential into exceptional achievements in the future. The Weizmann Institute Alpha program is based on Gagné (1993) which emphasizes the integration of intrapersonal and environmental catalysts into learning processes with the aim to drive talent development. We added the interpersonal dimension (collaborating, communicating, expressing idea) which will in turn influence the intrapersonal dimension, especially self-esteem, self-confidence, and increase motivation.

Dr. Orni Meerbaum-Salant
The Davidson Institute of Science Education, The Weizmann Institute of science
Israel

Orni Meerbaum Salant received her Ph.D. degree in Science Teaching from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. She is currently the director of gifted and high talented programs in the Davidson Institute of Science Education in the Weizmann Institute of Science. She is also a member of three program committees of computer science education: WiPSCE, CTE and ICER. Her primary research interests are mentoring high school software projects and declarative knowledge formalization in Scratch programming, students’ conceptualization of computer science, their problem solving approaches and abstraction skills, and gifted and high talented students.

Dr. bruria haberman
Holon Institute of technology of Israel and Davidson institute of science
Israel

Bruria Haberman received her Ph.D. degree in Science Teaching from the Weizmann Institute of Science. She is currently a senior lecturer in the Department of Computer Science in the Holon Institute of Technology. She is also a member of the computer science team in the Davidson Institute of Science Education in the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she initiated the CS, Academia & Industry program for talented high school students, and the Beaver Contest on Informatics. Her primary research interests are declarative knowledge formalization in locic programming, students’ conceptualization of computer science, their problem solving approaches and abstarction skills.

Sarah Pollack*

Education: 2007-2013: Ph.D, Department of Education in Hebrew University, Jerusalem 1998-2001: M.A in the department of Science Teaching, Weizmann institute

1994-1997: B.Sc. in Computer Science, Tel Aviv University


 

 

213 Another Theory of Relativity: Giftedness as Conditionality
Parallel Session, G&T

Emerging thoughts about giftedness see it: (1.) as a socially constructed entity that constantly evolves with our society, (2.) as an inclusive non-normative guiding framework that seeks out each individual’s unique giftedness and talents, and (3.) as a recursive person-in-situation realization that depends on the complexity of a system and the dynamics between an individual and his/her environment. These thoughts are quite different from the either-or reductionist model that sees giftedness as a static condition. This presentation will provide pedagogy and a definition that corresponds to the systemic, dynamic view of giftedness.

Owen Lo
University of British Columbia
Canada

Dr. Lo is currently working at the University of British Columbia in the capacity of assistant professor. His research interests with regards to gifted education include, but not limited to, inclusive education, teacher development, policy studies, historical review, and affective education.

Kuei-Fang Tsai*

Dr. Tsai is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education (with expertise in gifted education) at National Pingtung University of Education in Taiwan.

Chen-Ming Chen*

Dr. Chen is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education (with expertise in gifted education and psychometrics) at National Chiayi University of Education in Taiwan.


 

 

173 Architecture workshop for high talented children: Experience and method
Parallel Session, G&T

The presenter will share the experience of working with highly talented children in the Architecture Workshop. The Architecture Workshop encourages playfulness, creativity, imagination, fun, spontaneity, empathy, and the development of personal relationships. The lived space is more than the physical space. A place, a square, a street, a building, trees, light, people, etc., give a frame and articulate structure. Architecture Workshops insist on the creation of own and shared spaces, where vision, smell, and touch generate other dimensions.

Ana Gallego
PHD architect
Spain

I am an architect since 2003. I am currently teaching architecture for high talented children for the Santiago de Compostela USC University initiative programm and I have been doing it since 2012. I am PhD in architecture since 2015 with cum laude mention and I am a member of the people-environment research group of the University of A Coruña. My principle researching interests are Landscape and Vernacular Architecture, Green public space in cities, and Architecture education for Children. I atended several ostgraduate courses at University of Technology in Helsinki, Finland and at the Architecture University of Barcelona, Spain.


 

 

180 Balancing the gap between the acceleration policy and the instructional practices for the accelerated gifted and talented students in Saudi Arabian schools
Parallel Session, Programming

The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ perceptions of the acceleration policy and their experiences while teaching accelerated gifted and talented students in the regular classroom in Saudi Arabian schools. Participants were 15 classroom teachers from different schools. Qualitative data were gathered from semi-structured interviews. The overall findings demonstrate teachers’ capacities to undertake critical reflection on the acceleration policy and on their actual instructional practices for the accelerated gifted and talented students. Two major themes are highlighted in this presentation: (1) elements of an acceleration policy; and (2) the synergistic interaction between teacher competence and teacher confidence.

Faisal Alamiri
The University of Jeddah
Saudi Arabia

Dr. Faisal Alamiri, has extended specialty in gifted education including Bachelor, Master, and Ph.D, assistant professor in giftedness and creativity, and Chair of Special Education Department at the Faculty of Education, The University of Jeddah. He is a member of the strategic committee for developing the policies, initiatives, and academic programs at the University of Jeddah. He is a member of the executive committee of The Asia-Pacific Federation on Giftedness (APFG). He teaches gifted education and creativity courses at postgraduate level. His research interest focuses on gifted education policies, curriculum and pedagogy, and creativity.


 

 

186 Being with Like-Minds: A Mixed Methods Study of Gifted Children’s Perspectives
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

What does it mean to be like-minded? And what opportunities do gifted children have to engage with like-minded peers? This study used surveys and interviews to explore these questions with primary and intermediate students engaged in MindPlus, a one day a week programme of the New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education. A focus group of alumni explored and elaborated upon these findings, helping us understand the student experience and its implications. We will share the study design, findings, and implications for practice and research in this session.

Tracy Riley
Massey University
New Zealand

Associate Professor Tracy Riley works in the Institute of Education, and teaches gifted education at post graduate level, and supervises Masters and PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a lifetime member of giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education, in recognition for her service as the founding Chairperson and a New Zealand Delegate to the World Council.

Deborah Walker
New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education
New Zealand

Deb is a New Zealand educator who has held various roles over the years in mainstream and specialised settings in NZ, Canada and the UK. She is currently the CEO of the NZCGE. She is passionate about leading positive change and, as a result of this, has played an integral part in the merger of the two organisations. She is avidly and actively committed to strength-based education and sustainability for the programme. Deb has a Masters of Education degree, with a focus on gifted, through Massey University and has completed a Graduate Diploma in Not-For-Profit Management Business Management from Unitec.


 

 

139 Belonging: Young gifted children starting school
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Teachers know, a young child needs to feel they belong at school before they can engage in new learning. Yet there is little information about how a young gifted child establishes a feeling of belonging (attachment) and what behaviours identify this process. A year-long qualitative case study, exploring influences on young gifted children entering a new learning environment, provided rich data about everyday adjustment by these children, including the influence of attachment behaviours. It is important teachers are aware of this aspect of transition and how it can affect a gifted child’s engagement in the learning program.

Anne Grant
Deakin University, Australia
Australia

Dr Anne Grant Anne has taught in the early childhood field for many years, with children who have a range of abilities from those identified as gifted through to children with severe developmental delay. She lectures at university level in gifted and early childhood education, at both undergraduate and post graduate level. Anne co-authored the DEECD online Resource “Making a Difference for Young Gifted and Talented Children” and is also involved in writing on the educational needs of young gifted children.


 

 

104 Beyond Imagining: A case study in building comprehensive gifted services that embrace diversity
Poster, Programming

Negligible funding requires that schools integrate the needs of diverse learners into every aspect and initiative of school. Learn how one district enfranchised underrepresented populations by incorporating a continuum of diversified gifted services (all without state funding). The presenter provides a roadmap for duplicating her efforts by answering the questions: How can schools: 1) Make your gifted population reflect the school’s demographics? 2) Provide teacher training in understanding affective and academic needs of diverse gifted students? 3) Monitor how various subpopulations make academic progress? 4) Ensure teachers have the training necessary to differentiate instruction, accelerate curriculum, and provide enrichment opportunities?

Dina Brulles
Paradise Valley Unified School District
United States

Dina Brulles, Ph.D., is the Director of Gifted Education at Paradise Valley Unified School District in Arizona also the Gifted Program Coordinator at Arizona State University. The gifted programs Dina oversees incorporate innovative uses of technology, enfranchise underrepresented populations and provide extensive professional development opportunities. Dina serves on the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Board of Directors as the school district representative. Dr. Brulles co-authored the books, Differentiated Lessons for All Learners, The Cluster Grouping Handbook: How To Challenge Gifted Students and Improve Achievement For All, Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classrooms, and Helping All Gifted Children Learn.


 

 

32 Bright to brilliant: Coaching for high ability children and their families
Parallel Session, Guidance

The worldwide body for coaches—the International Coach Federation—defines coaching as partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximise their personal potential. Bringing coaching out of the boardroom and into the playroom (and classroom) is certainly new. Applied to high ability children and their families, coaching allows potential and capacity to be realised earlier. Presented with new and rigorous research from the fields of Positive Psychology, the use of higher-order questioning, and the efficacy of strengths-based assessments, this comparatively new field is explored from theory through to practice.

Alan D. Thompson
Life Architect
Australia

Alan is widely regarded as one of the world’s foremost gifted coaches. He specialises in working with families, and is an expert on high performance. Alan is the National Gifted Children’s Coordinator for Australian Mensa, and sits on the Gifted Youth Committee for Mensa International. He is an Associate Certified Coach with the International Coach Federation. He is also a Certified Genius Coach. Alan was the principal consultant to GE General Electric’s Decoding Genius series. Alan has published several works, including the recent book BRIGHT: Seeing superstars, listening to their worlds, and moving out of the way. More at: LifeArchitect.com.au


 

 

207 Building a new Gifted and Talented program in Saudi Arabia
Parallel Session, G&T

This session looks at a new program in an International Baccalaureate School in Saudi Arabia, how to establish a new program, and considerations in an international context.

Robyn Collins
The King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Saudi Arabia

Robyn Collins has had over 30 years experience in education in Australia and internationally. She has worked in school reform, mentoring principals and establishing gifted education programs.


 

 

71 Bullying among gifted students
Parallel Session, Programming

The purpose of this study is to examine traditional and cyberbullying among 177 Turkish gifted students attending science and art centers. Additionally, Information Communication Technology (ICT) usage of gifted students were The revised Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire was used to measure bullying and victimization experiences of the gifted students. The revised Cyber Bullying Inventory II was utilized to measure cyber bullying and victimization experiences of the gifted students.

Halil Aslan
Science and Art Center
Turkey

I was born in Adana, Turkey. I graduated from department of counseling at Aegean University with second rank (2005) as BA. I graduated from Middle East Technical University, which is one the best university in Turkey, at department of educational science as MA (2016). I am my PHD students at METU right now. My research interest are counseling with gifted students and their families, counseling issues of gifted students, bullying among gifted students.

Ozgur Erdur-Baker
MİDDLE EAST TECHNİCAL UNİVERSITY
Turkey

she was professor at department of educational science at middle east technical university. her PHD work has been carried out at University of Texas Austin, Counseling Psychology, 2002. her research interests are Outcome and process research in counseling, gender and culture sensitive counseling, peer bullying (traditional and cyber bullying), trauma, grief and disaster psychology.


 

 

182 But I’m a Second-Grader! Benefits and Challenges of Gifted Acceleration
Symposium, G&T

Acceleration has long been championed by stakeholders in the education of gifted children. Many of the benefits of acceleration, however, are dependent upon the proper implementation of acceleration strategies. This symposium will include a variety of perspectives on acceleration, structured by and viewed through the lens of one gifted student’s personal experience. Practicing gifted educators from Australia and the United States will provide professional perspectives about his story, and a leading authority on gifted education will provide context and links to the research literature. Implications and recommendations for practice will be discussed.

Marshall Haning
University of Florida
United States

Marshall Haning is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Florida, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in choral music education, the history, philosophy, and psychology of music education, and quantitative research methods. Dr. Haning’s research interests include music curricula, music teacher preparation, and the role of performance in the music education paradigm. He has had articles published in the Journal of Music Teacher Education and Contributions to Music Education, and is a frequent presenter at state, national, and international research conferences.

Rachael Haning
Riverside Elementary School
United States

Rachael Grech Haning is a 10-year veteran teacher who has spent 5 years teaching exclusively gifted students. She holds a bachelor’s degree in gifted education from Kent State University, where she studied with Dr. James Delisle. Ms. Haning’s teaching career spans 2 states, and includes Menlo Park Academy, which is the only publicly funded charter school for gifted students in the state of Ohio. She currently teaches gifted education to 4th and 5th grade students in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. When not teaching, she enjoys reading, travelling, and baking.

Emily Edwards
St. Andrews Cathedral School
Australia

Emily Edwards is a passionate educator, mother of three, and lifelong learner who currently serves as Deputy Head of Junior School, Pastoral Care Coordinator, and Gifted and Talented Coordinator at St. Andrew’s Cathedral School in Sydney, NSW. She has over 20 years of classroom experience, holds a Master’s degree in Gifted Education from UNSW and has conducted workshops on gifted education, twice-exceptional students, acceleration, and behaviour management, among other topics. Mrs. Edwards is also an Art and Drama teacher, a member of the Museum of Contemporary Arts Teachers Advisory Council, and a member of the Learning Spaces Committee.


 

 

169 Can I Handle This Highly-Intelligent but Maladjusted Gifted Student? International Comparison of Gifted Stereotyping
Parallel Session, G&T

Teachers’ conceptions of giftedness influence which students they identify as gifted, while these conceptions depend on teachers’ cultural background. We assess and compare pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students in Germany and Australia. Pre-service teachers read short descriptions (i.e., vignettes) of a student, who varied in ability level (gifted/average) and sex (girl/boy), and indicated their attitudes towards the student (dimensions: intellectual ability, social-emotional ability, maladjustment). Furthermore, they rated their own motivation in teaching the student (dimensions: enthusiasm and self-efficacy). Our results indicate an association between pre-service teachers’ attitudes and motivational variables which could affect how they behave towards these students.

Svenja Matheis
University of Koblenz-Landau
Germany

Svenja Matheis is a PhD student in psychology at the Graduate School Teaching & Learning Processes (UpGrade) at Koblenz-Landau University, Germany. The Graduate School is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Projects at the Graduate School intend to analyse the quality of pedagogical interaction in teaching and learning as a function of teachers’ or students’ personal characteristics. The topic of Svenja’s project is giftedness in a school context with a main focus on assessing, comparing and explaining pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards gifted students. Contact and further information: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Svenja_Matheis

Franzis Preckel*

Franzis Preckel is full professor of Giftedness Research and Education at the University of Trier since 2006. She received her diploma in psychology 1998 and her doctorate 2002 from the Westfaelische-Wilhelms-University, Muenster. From 2003-2006 she was assistant professor and head of the Counceling Center for the Gifted and Talented at Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich. Her main research interests are intelligence, giftedness, factors influencing talent development, and psychological assessment. She published in more than 200 papers, chapters, books, and conference presentations including. highly ranked refereed journals (AERJ, Intelligence, JPSP). She is on the editorial board of Diagnostica and Gifted and Talented International.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Leonie Kronborg is a Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education in the Faculty of Education, Monash University, Australia. Her research interests have focused on evaluation of curriculum for gifted and talented students, talent development of females, in particular, eminent Australian women, young gifted and talented children and their education, identification of gifted and talented children, professional development for teachers of the gifted and talented, curriculum for the gifted and talented, creativity, talent development, gifted females and gifted children experiencing learning disabilities. Additionally, she coordinates a Gifted Educational Advisory Service for parents and teachers of gifted children.


 

 

132 Can we legislate for gifted education?
Parallel Session, G&T

Across the globe, countries are considering how to ensure they meet the 17 sustainable development goals developed by the United Nations that are to be achieved by 2030. If countries are to meet the call for inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning for all by 2030, then examining legislation and policy for gifted education alongside the implementation of such policies becomes a crucial component in this process. This study will consider how policy/legislation impact and support gifted learners, then look to identify how policy/legislation can be better informed by research and theory within gifted education.

Kai Zhang
University of Glasgow
United Kingdom

Kai Zhang received a BA in Law from the East China University of Political Science and Law and MSc in educational studies from the University of Glasgow. In this year, he got scholarship Co-sponsored by the University of Glasgow and Chinese Government and started his PhD study in gifted and talented education. Before coming to the UK, he worked as a legal counsellor and educational researcher for a Chinese Institution mainly in the in the field of educational legislation and policies. The legal and educational background particularly support his research in gifted education.


 

 

33 ChallenGE Project: Applying design-thinking and design-based research to improve outcomes for gifted students
Parallel Session, Programming

Applying a design-thinking model to gifted education enables teachers/leaders to develop tailored programs for gifted students in their specific context. Nearly one third of schools in the Association of Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA) have elected to join AISSA’s ChallenGE Project, in partnership with Flinders University, inspired by the question “how might we improve outcomes for our highly able students?” This paper will present the design-thinking model that has been adapted and developed for the ChallenGE Project, and outline the parallel research project, using design-based methodology, that will monitor and evaluate the efficacy and impact of this intervention.

Janet Farrall
Association of Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA)
Australia

Janet works as a Senior Educational Consultant at The Association of Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA). She has extensive experience in the field of Gifted Education and is the ChallenGE Project lead. Janet conducts workshops on the General Capabilities of Critical and Creative Thinking and Ethical Understanding in the Australian Curriculum, in order to build teacher capacity to meet the needs of all learners, including the gifted. She also works with school leaders to provide assistance with identifying gifted students and differentiating the curriculum to meet their needs.

Alice Duffield
Association of Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA)
Australia

Alice has extensive experience in special education, both as a teacher and educational consultant. Her particular interests include supporting teachers to effectively cater for students with diverse needs in the areas of curriculum development and improving outcomes for gifted students. Alice currently works for the AISSA as a Senior Education Consultant and as the Coordinator of Special Education Services. She sits on the Ministerial Advisory Committee for Children and Students with Disabilities.

Desiree Gilbert
Association of Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA)
Australia

Desiree works as a Consultant at AISSA. She has extensive experience in Numeracy and Mathematics. Desiree provides advice and support to schools in designing a range of professional learning opportunities to build teacher capacity. Her focus is on curriculum development and meeting the needs of all students, including the gifted. Desiree has published two books supporting practical classroom strategies in literacy and numeracy and is currently engaged in Doctoral research in the area of pedagogical change.

Lesley Henderson
Flinders University
Australia

Lesley coordinates the Gifted Education specialization at Flinders University and is the Assistant Dean, Teaching and Learning in the School of Education. She is the SA Director on the Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented (AAEGT), and the AAEGT representative on the Australian Alliance of Associations in Education (AAAE).


 

 

187 Change Management for Gifted Programming
Parallel Session, Leadership

Leading change in gifted education from the position of middle leadership can be a challenging undertaking. Despite this, it is possible to lead significant, transformational change. This session will apply John Kotter’s change management research to gifted education. This story of change management explores the process required for a paradigm shift in a large P-12 College, impacting the philosophy, vision, policy, strategy, programming, identification, and provisions for high potential learners. Key lessons from this experience will be shared to inform and inspire gifted education leaders, addressing strategies to grow influence and apply sound change management processes applicable to numerous educational settings.

Rachel Lam
Overnewton Anglican Community College
Australia

Rachel Lam is the Head of Talent and Potential at Overnewton Anglican Community College, a P-12 duel campus co-educational school. Rachel has been in this newly developed role since the beginning of 2016 and is implementing a large-scale change initiative across the College’s six sub-schools in terms of the philosophy, provisions and the management of programs for high potential learners. Previously, she has been a College leader as ‘Canowindra’ Head of Teaching and Learning, Middle School Humanities and Gifted Education Coordinator in various sub schools. Rachel is currently studying her Masters in Educational Management at the University of Melbourne.


 

 

246 Clarity and fuzziness in the curriculum: Innovating curricula for high ability learners
Parallel Session, Programming

This presentation explores cases studies about how select secondary schools in Singapore go about dealing with curriculum innovation and implementation, to offer challenging learning experiences for high ability learners. The findings point to both clarity and fuzziness in the dominant discourses at both the school and individual teacher levels about what the curriculum is expected to offer. The fuzziness in the innovation process was also further affected by the teachers’ differing conceptions of the characteristics and needs of high ability learners. Explicating the different discourses contributes greatly to the further development of educational programmes for high ability learners.

Letchmi Devi Ponnusamy
National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Letchmi is currently a Lecturer with the Early Childhood and Special Needs Academic Group at the National Institute of Education (Singapore). She teaches Masters and degree level courses in instructional differentiation, critical and creative thinking, and curriculum development for high ability learners. She previously served as a secondary school science teacher and an Assistant Department Head for a school-based gifted programme. Her research interests include instructional differentiation, concept-based curriculum development and investigating teacher agency during curriculum innovation. She has written and reviewed book chapters and journal articles related to curriculum implementation and other issues in gifted education.

Ruilin Elizabeth Koh*

Elizabeth Koh, is Assistant Dean, Research Translation at the Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore. Her particular research interest involves 21st century competency of collaboration in technology mediated environments. She has conducted quasi-experiments and case studies during her doctoral studies in Information Systems at the National University of Singapore. She is currently the principal investigator and co-PI of several OER ERFP projects. She is also the Associate Editor of Learning: Research and Practice. She has published in peer-reviewed journals such as Computers & Education, IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, and The Asia-Pacific Educational Researcher.


 

 

339 Classical Chinese Children Primer: A gem in nurturing giftedness
Parallel Session, Programming

Previously in China, early childhood education was known as “enlightenment” with the focus on educating the child as a whole. In today’s China, there is a revival of using these materials to teach children. This presentation will introduce three Chinese children’s primer and discuss how these materials can be valuable resources in nurturing children’s potential, especially for those who are more advanced in language development.

Caroline Kwok
MegaBrain Institute
Hong Kong

Caroline Kwok, corporate consultant, for over 30 years studied the human brain as it relates to potential development. In the last 10 years have approached this topic from ancient Chinese sources, and combining with today’s understanding of the human brain, has designed programs and consultant projects. Caroline also co-chaired the 1995 WCGTC in Hong Kong.


 

 

377 Cluster Grouping at OLGC: Meeting the needs of gifted learners in a mainstream setting
Parallel Session, Programming

The cluster-grouping model was introduced to a mainstream Catholic primary school in a 2012 pilot project designed to address the needs of identified gifted learners. The program was successively expanded through the Diverse Learners team and the school currently (2017) has cluster groups in Years 1-6. The cluster grouping strategy was selected due to strong research evidence reporting to “deliver a full-time cost-effective programme for gifted and talented students” (Biddock, 2009). This model represents best practice in a mainstream setting and has relevance for school educators interested in meeting the needs of high-achieving gifted students.

Janet Agostino
Our Lady of Good Counsel School
Australia

Janet Agostino is an educator with over three decades of teaching experience across a range of settings, including special schools and mainstream primary and high schools. Ms Agostino holds a Bachelor of Education (Macquarie University), Graduate Diploma in Primary/Infants teaching (UNE), Graduate Diploma in Special Education (UTS), and a Master of Gifted Education from UNSW as well as a Fellowship in Classical Guitar performance. Ms Agostino currently leads the ‘Diverse Learners’ team at Our Lady of Good Counsel School . She also directs the UNSW Guitar Ensemble in the School of Arts and Media.


 

 

288 Compassionate Empathy and Emotional Fragility: Supporting the Sensitive Gifted Child
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

For many sensitive gifted youngsters, their capacity to tune in to the feelings of others can be both a blessing and a curse. Acutely aware, these perceptive children have a capacity for care that exceeds their years. Yet, their intense concern can also threaten their emotional well-being as they may feel overwhelmed by the emotional intensity of those around them and may experience stress, anxiety, and inner turmoil. The purpose of this presentation is to compare the constructs of cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and compassionate empathy, providing caring adults with successful tools for supporting and nurturing the emotionally gifted child.

Michele Kane
Northeastern Illinois University
United States

Michele Kane, Ed.D. is a Professor of Counselor and Special Education at Northeastern Illinois University where she coordinates the Master of Arts in Gifted Education Program. Michele currently serves on the Parent Editorial and Content Advisory Board for the National Association for Gifted Children, is past-president of the Illinois Association for Gifted Children, and is a contributing author to six edited books and co-author of Planting Seeds of Mindfulness. Inspired by her experience raising six gifted children, a major focus of Michele’s work is related to social and emotional needs of gifted, parenting gifted children, and spirituality and giftedness.


 

 

172 Conditions Gifted Students and Their Peers Prefer When Working Alone and With Others on a Challenging Project
Parallel Session, G&T

Canadian students (n=325) in Grades 6-8 with low, moderate, high, and gifted reasoning ability completed a survey assessing their preferences for individual and collaborative project-work under different conditions. Gifted students, like their peers, did not have a preference for learning alone or with others. They preferred both, under different conditions. The popularity of reliable co-workers, avoiding conflict, protecting their grade, competition, and working alone on Math projects increased with ability. The conditions most important to students’ preferences for individual and collaborative project-work were heterogeneous within and across all ability groups.

Lannie Kanevsky
Simon Fraser University
Canada

Lannie Kanevsky, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada). Her research interests include individual and ability-related differences in the conditions students’ prefer when working individually and collaboratively. She believes individual students’ strengths and preferences should be integrated in the design of challenging learning experiences for them.


 

 

285 Contributions of Critical Thinking to Motivation
Parallel Session, Misc

Critical thinking and motivation have been considered as two important factors contributing to learning. The aim of this descriptive research is to find out the contribution of critical thinking to motivation on 30 fifth grade gifted students. The instruments used, were Cornell Critical Thinking Test Level X and Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire (SRQ-A). In the analysis of findings, arithmetic average, standard deviations, and the correlations between variables were calculated. Afterwards, the stepwise regression analyses were conducted to find out whether or not the Cornell Critical Thinking Test Level X components are good predictors of Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire components. Results were discussed.

Birsel Nemlioglu
Maltepe University
Turkey

Dr. Sevgi Birsel NEMLIOGLU got her MA degree (Educational Psychology, Ankara university) in 1981 and PhD degree in 2011 (Educational Psychology, Ankara university). As an Assis. Prof. she has been working at Maltepe University since 2013.

Umit Davasiıgil
Maltepe University
Turkey

Prof. Dr. Umit Davasligil is the graduate of an American College in Istanbul, which was accredited as a Junior College. She got her license, and PhD degrees in Istanbul University. She is the founder of the Division of Gifted Education for the first time in Turkey in 2002, which initiated a licensed four-year program, a Masters’ program in 2003, and a PhD program in 2006. Her research interests are in creativity and thinking skills in gifted students and early identification of mathematically precocious children. Since 2010, she has been the head of the Department of Special Education of Maltepe University.


 

 

58 Counseling Parents of Gifted Children: A Brazilian Experience
Parallel Session, Guidance

This presentation aims to describe a counseling service for parents of gifted children implemented in a Brazilian university. The main purpose of this service is to provide parents an opportunity to explore concerns and difficulties they face in raising a gifted child, to receive information about giftedness, and to discuss strategies to be applied in the family context to enhance children talent development. The activities implemented and the dynamic of the meetings are described. The outcomes reported by the participants of this service are also presented. We will discuss problems faced by these families and the importance of guiding them.

Denise Fleith
University of Brasilia
Brazil

Denise de Souza Fleith, Ph.D., is a psychologist and an associate professor at the Institute of Psychology, University of Brasilia, Brazil. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Connecticut in gifted and talented education. Dr. Fleith is the vice-president of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children. She is a consultant for the Ministry of Education, a researcher at the National Council of Scientific and Technological Development in Brazil, and a member of editorial boards of Brazilian and international journals. She founded, with other scholars, the Brazilian Council for Giftedness.

Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende
University of Brasilia
Brazil

Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende is a psychologist and a Ph.D. student at the Processes of Human Development and Health Program, Institute of Psychology, University of Brasilia, Brazil. Her research interests include creativity and innovation, digital technology in education, talent development and giftedness, and positive psychology.


 

 

324 Creative Characteristics and Strategies for Developing Creative Potential in Teachers’ Perception
Parallel Session, Creativity

This research aimed to describe how teachers perceive the creative characteristics in themselves, other people and their students and how they establish strategies to develop creativity in the classroom. The participants were 75 teachers of basic education. The results revealed that there are differences in the teachers’ perception related to gender, age and teaching time. Personality traits, creative thinking skills, and academic and artistic skills were most recognized by teachers, while the strategies and activities adopted were associated with the expression of ideas and the production of texts and drawings. The need for investment in teacher training was evidenced.

Jane Farias Chgaas Ferreira
University of Brazilia
Brazil

I’m PhD in Human Development Processes, professor from the Department of Educational and Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Brazilia.


 

 

270 Creative Engineering and Design in Action: Designing and Evaluating Learning Activities Connecting Engineering and Creativity
Parallel Session, Creativity

This presentation will focus on activities connecting creativity and engineering and students’ perceptions of the activities. A design-based research framework guided this inquiry. Middle and high-school students enrolled in a summer program for gifted and talented students participated in engineering courses and completed surveys on their experiences. Curriculum materials and student artifacts were evaluated for inclusion of creativity indicators. Results indicate that the activities and student artifacts addressed several creativity indicators; however, few of the students mentioned creativity development as one of the benefits of participation. Implications for gifted programs emphasizing creativity will be discussed.

Nielsen Pereira
Purdue University
United States

Assistant Professor of Gifted, Creative, and Talented Studies at Purdue University. His research interests include the design and assessment of learning in varied gifted and talented education contexts, understanding gifted and talented student experiences in talent development programs, and conceptual and measurement issues in the identification of gifted and talented populations. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Gifted and Talented International and on the editorial board member for the Journal of Advanced Academics and Gifted Child Quarterly. He taught English as a second language for 12 years in public schools and language institutes in Brazil.

Mehdi Ghahremani*

Mehdi Ghahremani is a doctoral student and graduate research assistant at Purdue University. His research interests include physics education, creative and critical thinking, and conceptions of giftedness.

Shawn Jones*

Assistant Professor of engineering and a Fulton Exemplar Faculty member in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches context-centered electrical engineering and embedded systems design courses, and studies the use of context in both K-12 and undergraduate engineering design education. He is PI on several NSF-funded projects related to design, including an NSF Early CAREER Award entitled “CAREER: Engineering Design Across Navajo Culture, Community, and Society.” He has also been part of the teaching team for NSF’s Innovation Corps for Learning, and was named one of ASEE PRISM’s “20 Faculty Under 40” in 2014.


 

 

221 Creative Thinking in a Regular Classroom: Only for some
Parallel Session, Creativity

This presentation will look at the the teaching of highly creative students who have become disengaged with regular classroom cultures and the cultural mechanisms that restrict opportunities for these students to display what they know. Current education provision favours academically minded students: this approach disadvantages practically minded students especially if these students are highly creative. This presentation will identify the characteristics of learning cultures that support highly creative students.

Dave Camilleri
The University of Melbourne
Australia

David Camilleri is a PhD student at The University of Melbourne’s Graduate Schools of Education. He is a practicing secondary school teacher, university educator, and has over ten years of experience working with adolescents in a variety of contexts. He has completed a Post Graduate Diploma of Education (Humanities & E.A.L.), a Master of Teaching in Thinking, Creativity, and Knowledge, Master of Education in Relationship Skills, and a Master of Arts in Philosophy. David’s research and teaching interests include philosophy, intelligence, creativity, cognitive psychology, learning theories, neuropsychology, and knowledge enhancement.


 

 

284 Creativity as Described by Young, Ekphrastic Poetry Contest Winners
Parallel Session, Creativity

“There is no time for creativity. We have too much content to cover” are words often heard in educational settings. However, the eight young creators who participated in my study have strong opposing beliefs about creativity in schools. This session will give a brief background to how this study came about, will present the findings of this qualitative, descriptive case study, and will conclude with the implications of the findings. Hopefully, their experiences with creativity will illuminate the value of creativity in the lives of young learners and give insight into how creativity impacts their learning and their well-being.

Martha Champa
University of Toledo
United States

Dr. Martha Champa is an educator fascinated by the learning experiences of her students. Through the years, she has taught young people in all grades, from grade 1 through graduate school. Currently, she prepares teachers in literacy instruction at the University of Toledo. To keep herself grounded in day-to-day practice, she also teaches gifted middle school students at Washington Local Schools in Toledo, Ohio. She has been observing the effect of teaching content while incorporating creativity. These observations led her to the topic of her doctoral dissertation: creativity from the perspective of young creators.


 

 

82 Cross Cultural Instrumentation for Gifted Education Research and Programming: Purdue’s Repository
Symposium, Misc

In this session we showcase a recent website available through our center that contains a collection of instruments that researchers can download and use in their own research and that practitioners can use in their identification, programming, and evaluation efforts. A brief overview of these instruments, their psychometric properties, and the populations and cultures with which they have been studied will be presented together with complete references of development of and research with these instruments and a demonstration of the website where they are available. We will share TOF, MCA, SPOCQ, HOPE Scale (not downloadable), CPS—Revised, among others.

Marcia Gentry
Purdue University
United States

professor of Educational Studies, directs the Gifted Education Research Institute at Purdue University. She actively participates in NAGC and AERA, frequently contributes to the literature, has national and international partnerships, and regularly serves as a speaker and consultant. Marcia received multiple grants in support of her work with low-SES, Native American, and underrepresented gifted youth. Her research interests include student attitudes toward school; using cluster-grouping and differentiation to meet the needs of gifted youth while helping all students achieve at high levels; non-traditional settings for talent development; and the development and recognition of talent among underserved populations.

Nielsen Pereira
College of Education, Department of Educational Studies
United States

Assistant Professor of Gifted, Creative, and Talented Education at Purdue University. His research interests include design and assessment of learning in varied gifted and talented education contexts; understanding gifted and talented student experiences in talent development programs in and out of school; identification and talent development of English Language Learners; and conceptual, contextual, and measurement issues in the identification of gifted and talented populations.

Rachael Kenney
Purdue University
United States

is an Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Purdue University with a joint appointment in the Department of Mathematics and Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research focuses on learners’ interactions with the language of mathematics and teachers’ uses of informal assessment for differentiation and learning. Her publications attend to learners from a variety of contexts, including ELLs, students who struggle in mathematics, and pre-service teachers. Dr. Kenney has worked on two grants supported by the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program and led professional development workshops in gifted education.

C. Matthew Fugate
University of Houston, Downtown
United States

Assistant Professor, University of Houston, Downtown (Ph.D. Purdue University, 2014; Master’s UConn) Matthew worked as an elementary teacher, gifted and magnet coordinator for Houston Independent School District. Matthew’s research focuses on twice exceptionality. He examined the relationship between working memory and creativity among gifted ADHD students; coping mechanisms of twice-exceptional girls in secondary school concerning academics and interpersonal relationships; and he is a team member working to increase research, identification, and service of gifted Native Americans. He has presented to parents and teachers across the United States on topics including creativity, 2E, underserved populations, and Total School Cluster Grouping.

Yukiko Maeda
Purdue University
United States

Associate Professor of Research Design and Methodology. Her research promotes understanding, establishing and disseminating best practices in the use of data in educational research. She is expertise in meta-analysis and multilevel modeling. Her recent research contributions include understanding data use at school settings for decision making and identifying and presenting remedies for methodological issues for data analysis.


 

 

327 Cultivating Imagination with Elegant Problems
Parallel Session, Creativity

When mathematicians, scientists, artists, and leaders refer to creative contributions in their field, they have often described the best solution as “elegant.” This observation led to the realization that posed problems need to be elegant as well. What makes a problem elegant? One part of a six-part answer is “worthiness.” Problems, challenges, or assignments that demonstrate worthiness are meaningful for the discipline, the field, as well as the person. Developing Elegant Problems is a problem-based approach to curriculum design that engages the imagination and encourages creative thinking from the teacher as well as the students.

Sandra I Kay

United States

With a Doctorate and Master of Education in Special Education from Teachers College, Columbia University, Sandra Kay’s research interests focus on developing talent/expertise and on the problem-finding aspects of creative thought, visual thinking, and other habits of mind that engage the imagination and promote self-directed inquiry in children and adults.

As a founding faculty member of the Center for Teaching Critical Thinking and Creativity (CTCTC) at San Diego State University, she developed courses on creative thinking and is spearheading the production of a not-for-profit educational documentary on developing creative viewing skills of audience members entitled “Engaging the Imagination: Wally’s Way.”


 

 

252 Culture for Knowing Giftedness among Children: Towards a Research Praxis
Parallel Session, G&T

This study attempts to explore how culture is necessary in children’s giftedness researches. Culture is unveiled firstly as a theoretical concept of giftedness with epistemological grounding, distinct meanings, and application and secondly as anunderpinning of giftedness. Children’s culture and development mutually constitute each other. Achievement is intrinsic to culture and is a cultural process. Children inhabit an environment constructed through centuries of human endeavor. They come to participate in culturally defined ways of thinking, creating, and performing. Diversity, relativism, and inclusion are key approaches to having insight into giftedness in cultural context.

Zahirul Islam
Jahangirnagar University
Bangladesh

Zahirul Islam is a researcher about giftedness. Currently, he is Ph D Researcher at the Department of Anthropology, Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh. He obtained his M. Phil on early childhood. He is WCGTC delegate in Bangladesh, working as Scientist in Early Concern, and worked with UNDP, Plan, UNICEF, GIZ, Save the Children, Sesame Workshop, SOS Children’s Village. He has several international publications.


 

 

18 Defensible Identification: We Can’t Lead Differentiation if We Don’t Know Who We Have!
Parallel Session, Identification

In a recent grant funded project, the presenter found a viable way to develop and implement a “defensible” identification system that tells educational planner specific information that places students accurately into appropriately differentiated services and ensures that traditionally under-served populations with high potential are recognized and supported as well. The system developed as well as the support services provided will be shared with audience participants.

Karen Rogers
University of St. Thomas
United States

Karen Rogers is excited to be back in Australia after her 3-year sojourn here from 2005-2008 as Director of Research for GERRIC (UNSW). She is Professor Emerita at University of St. Thomas, but has continued receiving government research grants to investigate what works for underserved and twice exceptional learners. She has written/ co-written 7 books, published over 200 articles, and conducted 98 program evaluations and field based studies. She currently sits on Advisory Boards of the US Department of Defense Overseas Schools, Grayson Gifted School, William & Mary Gifted Education Center, and the Minnesota Department of Education.


 

 

34 Demystifying Gifted: Race, Representation, & Restructuring
Parallel Session, Diversity

This study challenges the current construction of gifted education programs in the United States as being inculcated with racism, classism, and gender bias. Through a long history of inequality, a discourse has emerged creating barriers for marginalized gifted populations. Using a critical discourse-historical analysis approach and Foucauldian notions of power, the study helps to unravel the hegemonic practices that influenced the current state of gifted education programs. This research hopes to uncover barriers for marginalized gifted students so that issues may be reported and be restructured for a more just, equitable, and verdant education future for marginalized gifted students.

Lee Sapp
Tennessee Technological University
United States

Mr. Sapp is a former middle school social studies and literature teacher. Currently, he is a PhD student, research assistant, and secondary English education instructor in the College of Education (Curriculum & Instruction) at Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville, TN. His research focuses on at-risk and marginalized gifted education student populations as well as combating deficit-thinking in educational practices.


 

 

359 Depth and Complexity in the Curriculum for Gifted Students
Parallel Session, Programming

According to research, the curriculum that is preferred and most suited to gifted children allows them the deep levels of exploration when investigating a topic. This was demonstrated by data collected from the students participating in the Days of Excellence programs. The unique nature of these offerings is investigated, in an effort to understand the complex nature of the relationship between the achievement of depth and breadth in the students’ learning and the unique structure of the programs.

Mirella Olivier
BRAINways Education
Australia

Dr. Mirella Olivier is a teacher currently completing her PhD in Gifted Education. She is also the Coordinator of BRAINways EDUCATION (organisation offering a wide range of programs for gifted children), and a mother of two highly gifted children. Mirella’s first degree is in Medicine, and she also completed her Masters of Health Sciences, with focus on Sports Medicine, specifically on elite athletes.


 

 

319 Design-based research practises for the implementation of gifted education provisions in Australian schools
Poster, G&T

Australian education does not have a strong focus on gifted education. There are few token policies, and little is mandated. This poster will demonstrate the research process of a South Australian teacher, aiming to implement a Gifted Education program in their school context. This project was started to ensure that the school context, needs, and community are catered to effectively in the planning for a gifted program. This project will demonstrate the design-based research methodology used to discover the needs of the students in their community, the research gathered from this process, and “where to next.”

Danielle Cioffi
Cedar College
Australia

Danielle Cioffi is currently studying a Masters of Education, specialising in Gifted Education, at Flinders University, South Australia. She currently teaches full-time at an independent R-12 school in Adelaide, where she is also the Year 11 Co-ordinator, and Gifted Education Co-ordinator.


 

 

231 Designing and Assessment of Standards-Based Professional Development in Gifted Education
Parallel Session, Programming

Successful professional development is sustained, facilitates transfer of learning to practice, and provides educators with an opportunity to collaborate and reflect. In this session participants will be presented with a summary of recent standards-based professional development activities in the field of gifted education and learn how to use the Logic Model for planning professional development activities that make a difference.

Debbie Troxclair
Lamar University
United States

Dr. Troxclair has been an educator for 28 years in the PK-12 schools and at the university level in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Texas. She is an active member in several professional association in the field of gifted education, and has published and presented on a variety of topics at local, state, national, and international conferences.


 

 

44 Developing a Growth Mindset Culture amongst Academically Gifted and Highly Able Secondary Students
Parallel Session, Programming

This presentation will outline how a co-educational, academically selective entry secondary school in Victoria has changed the nature of assessment, reporting, awards, recognition, and praise to support highly able and gifted students to focus on learning, challenge, collaboration, and growth, rather than emphasising the fear-engendering focus on achievement. We identify a predominance of ‘fixed mindset’ traits (Dweck), in our student and family population and have worked hard to create a culture that supports the development of ‘growth mindset’ characteristics so that we can maximise their learning potential and support their wellbeing.

Sue Harrap
Nossal High School
Australia

I have held various roles in education. Originally a Biology/Science and Maths teacher, I began my career in Swaziland. I have taught and been an assistant/campus principal in both rural and urban settings, including K-12 and senior secondary, and worked closely with primary and tertiary colleagues. I started at Nossal High School, one of Victoria’s four selective entry government schools, in 2012. I have graduate qualifications in Education, Adolescent Welfare and Assessment, and a Masters in School Leadership. My recent work has been on the development of curriculum and pedagogy that facilitates a focus on progress, reflection and collaboration.


 

 

93 Developing a manuscript: Publishing in Gifted and Talented International
Parallel Session, G&T

What does a researcher, a PhD student, or early career academic need to consider if they want to convert their research into a publication for Gifted and Talented International (GTI), which is the journal of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children. In this session, the editors will individually share their ideas and insights on how they go about developing a manuscript for publication. They will discuss a range of questions that researchers who want their work published need to consider. What do the GTI guidelines advise?

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.

C. June Maker
University of Arizona
United States

C. June Maker, PhD, professor in the department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies, University of Arizona, prepares professors in special education and education of the gifted. She is an associate editor for Gifted and Talented International and the International Journal of Research in Education, and an Editorial Board member for other international journals. In 2015, she received the International Research Award from WCGTC and Doctor of Letters Degree from Western Kentucky University. Her research is on performance-based assessments and creativity development. She is a frequent keynote speaker. The website for her project, DISCOVER, is www.discover.arizona.edu, and her email is junemaker@hotmail.com.

Nielsen Pereira
Purdue University
United States

Nielsen Pereira is an Assistant Professor of Gifted, Creative, and Talented Studies at Purdue University. His research interests include the design and assessment of learning in varied gifted and talented education contexts, understanding gifted and talented student experiences in talent development programs, and conceptual and measurement issues in the identification of gifted and talented populations. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Gifted and Talented International and on the editorial board member for the Journal of Advanced Academics and Gifted Child Quarterly. He taught English as a second language for 12 years in public schools and language institutes in Brazil.

Ann Robinson*

Ann Robinson, PhD, professor in the School of Education, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, is the Founding Director of the Jodie Mahony Center for Gifted Education. She is an associate editor for Gifted and Talented International and former editor of Gifted Child Quarterly. She also serves as an Alternate Delegate to the WCGTC. Her research is on evidence-based practices in gifted education and on biography as a qualitative method and as a curricular intervention for talent development. She currently collaborates on international research projects with colleagues in Australia, Canada, and Germany. The website for the Mahony Center is http://ualr.edu/gifted/

Barbara Kerr*

Barbara Kerr is Distinguished Professor of Counseling Psychology at the University of Kansas and Director of the Counseling Laboratory for the Exploration of Optimal States, which provides both face to face and online services to creative people. Her research concerns the development of talent across domains, with a particular emphasis on gender issues and creativity. She is a licensed psychologist and Fellow of the American Psychological Association.She is lead author of the Smart Girls series of books and of Smart Boys, as well as six other books and over a hundred articles on giftedness, creativity, and talent.


 

 

19 Developing a system-wide approach to gifted education
Parallel Session, Leadership

This paper traces the development of one school system’s work in developing a system-wide approach to gifted education. Grounded in local data and evidence, research, and local contextual needs, we developed a series of recommendations to address a lack of attention to gifted education in any strategic way across our schools. This presentation describes the process of developing our system response to gifted education.

Craig Wattam
Catholic Schools Office Maitland-Newcastle
Australia

Craig has chaired the Gifted Education Working Party in the diocese of Maitland-Newcastle, which has been charged with the responsibility of developing and implementing a system-wide approach to gifted education. He has held senior roles in education in a number of dioceses in NSW. As Assistant Director of Schools and now principal of an independent Catholic College in Sydney, Craig is interested in ensuring that gifted learners are nurtured, catered for and engaged in their education.

Sally Brock
Catholic Schools Office Maitland-Newcastle
Australia

Sally Brock is the Education Officer Gifted Education K-12 for the Maitland-Newcastle diocese and a member of the diocese’s Gifted Education Committee. She has a particular interest in the development of a system-wide approach to gifted education. Sally is an experienced primary school educator, who has been responsible for the development and delivery of curriculum support to schools across the diocese. She has been instrumental in the delivery of professional development for staff to facilitate improvement in student academic performance.

Christine Chapple

Australia

Christine’s career in Education spans over 35 years. Christine was a secondary HSIE teacher and Studies Coordinator HSIE. In 2015 Christine took up the position of Education Officer (Secondary Curriculum) with the Maitland–Newcastle diocese. In this position she played an active role on the Diocesan Gifted and Talented Education Working Party with its prime task being the development and implementation of a strategic, system-wide approach to supporting gifted education in the diocese. She is continuing this work as a member of the Diocesan Gifted Education committee.


 

 

192 Developing an Online Learning Environment that Effectively Caters for Academically Gifted and Highly Able Secondary Students
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

This session will outline how a selective entry secondary school in Victoria has established an Online Learning Environment that: A) provides students with an effective differentiated learning experience B) develops learner independence and readiness for tertiary studies through the use of “Digital Delivery Day” events C) gives teaching staff the opportunity to further develop their online subject spaces through student feedback facilitated through an “Exemplary Online Course” rubric

Stuart Fankhauser
Nossal High School
Australia

I have been a variety of roles in my 20-year teaching career, however I have always gravitated towards the coordination and development of online learning. My primary specialist teaching area is in Physics, although I have often taught senior Information Technology and Mathematics. I completed my Masters in Education through research looking at the efficacy of teaching highly abstract Physics concepts to junior secondary students using computer based simulations. I co-authored three Mathematics Text books with Heinemann Education early in my career. I started at Nossal High School, one of Victoria’s four selective entry government schools in 2011.


 

 

195 Developing creative and critical problem solving skills in lower primary classrooms: a structured approach
Poster, Programming

In lower primary classrooms, there is a need for a well-developed, structured sequence of lessons that ‘ignite the spark’ of young bright minds. Equipping our students with the tools to be adaptable in our fast, changing world is a challenge for educators globally. The sequence of learning experiences in the Primary Programs option offered by the non-profit Future Problem Solving Program in Australia provides teachers with a sequentially developed structure to achieve this goal. Applying the FPS 6-step problem solving process to a broad range of genres and scenarios, develops students’ thinking skills, and ultimately, their Adaptability Quotient.

Nicola Desoe
Future Problem Solving Program Australia
Australia

Ms Nicola Desoe has a Diploma of Teaching (Primary) from the Brisbane College of Advanced Education, a Bachelor of Education from the University of South Australia and a Certificate of Gifted Education from the University of New South Wales. She has taught in rural, regional and urban Primary Classrooms for over 20 years, including 10 years as Co-ordinator of Gifted Programming. She has developed and taught gifted programs at four schools. Her particular area of interest is Future Problem Solving where she now serves as the Primary Programs Co-ordinator on the National Committee and on the International Topics Committee.


 

 

239 Developing Gifted Potential Through the Promotion of Autonomous Learning: A case study in a selective entry secondary school for the performing arts
Parallel Session, G&T

The music students in a selective entry performing arts secondary school form a diverse group. Although selection is based on musical ability, the level of proficiency varies from that of untrained giftedness to highly developed talent. Similarly, the level of individual motivation varies considerably as well. When a chamber music program is revamped to provide far greater autonomy of learning to the students, the results are staggering. By allowing students to choose whether they participate, with whom they play, which repertoire they will study, and when they will perform, they suddenly begin to take responsibility for their own learning.

Julie Haskell
Victorian College of the Arts Secondary School
Australia

Melbourne-born pianist Julie Haskell is a highly sought after chamber musician. Her performance experience is vast and has included countless piano recitals, live broadcasts, concerto performances and work as an orchestral pianist in Europe and Australia. Julie is well established as one of Melbourne’s leading piano teachers of young talented pianists. She taught for many years at the University of Melbourne and examines for the Australian Music Examination Board. Her doctoral thesis was in the area of music performance however her interest now lies in her work with gifted music students at the Victorian College of the Arts Secondary School.


 

 

128 Developing Leadership Identity: Universal Needs Necessary for Cultural Connections
Parallel Session, Diversity

The significance of identifying traditionally marginalized students as gifted learners is a matter of life quality and economic concern for rural communities. This state-wide grant project builds on the capacity of developing leadership identity. Developing leadership identity is connected to the categories of influence, group influences, and developing self with others. Through individual and collective demands of on-going reflection, analysis of values, beliefs, and attitudes—broad student, parent, and community views of leadership are reveled. A conceptual model illustrating the grounded theory of developing leadership identity and its influence on the identification of underrepresented gifted students is presented.

Justine Lopez
University of Denver
United States

Justine López, MA, is a doctoral candidate at the University of Denver. She is currently a member of the Right4Rural Research Team/Javits Grant, examining the impact of school/district leaders on the identification of underrepresented gifted students in rural areas. Teaching experience includes affiliate faculty at Regis University’s Dual Language Program; Department of Marketing, The Colorado Women’s College, Multicultural Voices of Discovery at the University of Denver; and Graphic Arts Communications instructor at the Community College of Denver. Her leadership perspectives align with 15+ years as a business owner, educating, leading, building, implementing, and guiding non-profit and for-profit business ventures.

Norma Hafenstein
University of Denver
United States

Dr. Hafenstein’s award-winning professional career spans numerous positions in leadership and scholarship. She is a Full Clinical Professor in the Teaching and Learning Sciences Department, founded the Ricks Center for Gifted Children, a PS-8 school on the campus, in 1984, and founded the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education in 1997. She presents extensively on giftedness at national and international conferences. Dr. Hafenstein has presented at the International Dabrowski Congress, Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted Annual Conference (SENG), World Council on Gifted and Talented Children Biennial World Conference (WCGTC), and the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA).

Kristina Hesbol
University of Denver
United States

Kristina A. Hesbol is Assistant Professor in the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Department at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. She has taught preK-graduate school, has served as a principal of three multi-lingual, multi-cultural schools, coordinated school improvement for a diverse school district, and served as a district Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Hesbol earned her Ph.D. at Loyola University (Chicago), and currently serves as a member of the Right4Rural Research Team, examining the impact of school and district leaders on the identification of culturally and linguistically diverse rural students.


 

 

91 Developing Musical Talent Into Elite Performance: A Historical and Educational Perspective
Parallel Session, G&T

This presentation will explore the topic of talent development and elite performance within the context of music education. It will examine key literature related to the areas of musical giftedness and talent development, identification, and the role of educational institutions and educators in the identification and cultivation of students who show potential for musical talent. This presentation will then discuss limitations in the literature, with particular reference to the Australian context, and outline ways in which musical talent development can be further studied in an effort to improve the educational equity of all musically gifted and talented students.

Rachel White
St Vincent’s Primary School
Australia

Rachel White is a Music and Drama teacher from Sydney, Australia. She has a Master of Music (Music Education) from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where she completed a thesis examining how teachers in New South Wales taught music listening to secondary students in Year 11 and 12. She is a casual academic and tertiary mentor with the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, and plays with several musical and theatrical ensembles around Sydney. Rachel is particularly interested in musical pedagogy, educational theory, and educational practices in talent development.


 

 

159 Developing National Programming for Advancing the Gifted and Talented in Israel
Parallel Session, G&T

During the past three years, the Maimonides Fund has been developing national programming for advancing the gifted and talented in Israel. Its rationale lies in the unique potential of the gifted and talented to impact fields of national priority, and their capacity to contribute significantly to advancing scientific and technological breakthroughs on a global scale. There are currently more than 900 high school students participating in our programs, all of which incorporate three core operational components: (1) co-funding between private philanthropy and Government, (2) nationwide implementation through institutions of higher education, and (3) individual support, social activities, and informal educational programming.

Eli Fried
Center for the Advancement of the Gifted and Talented, Maimonides Fund
Israel

Eli Fried is the Director General of the Future Scientists Center for Advancing the Gifted and Talented, operated by the Maimonides Fund. For the past three years, Eli has been creating and operating national gifted education programs in Israel. Prior to this, he served as advisor to the Director General of the Ministry of Education. With degrees in law and economics, Eli moved to Israel from Australia some 15 years ago, at which time he became involved in the fields of policy and education, working at Tel Aviv University’s School of Government and Policy and with numerous private philanthropies.


 

 

171 Development and Validation of Self-concept Inventory for Preschooler (SCI-K)
Parallel Session, Identification

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Self-concept Inventory (SCI-K) for preschoolers. Four domains (cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral) and seven sub-variables (linguistic, logical-mathematical, personality-emotional, relationship with friends and parents, physical ability, and appearance) were selected and developed. Research to determine validity will be described.

Kyunghwa Lee
Soongsil University
South Korea

Professor of Soongsil University and dean of Graduate school of Education, director of institute of SIGT. And a member of WCGTC, pre-president of Korea Association for Gifted Education.

Jinyoung Koh*

Vice direcor of SIGT(Sejong Institute of Gifted and Talented Education)


 

 

196 Development and Validation of Self-Directed Learning Ability Test
Parallel Session, Identification

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the ‘Self-directed Learning Ability Test.’ Based on previous studies, three domains (cognitive, motivational, behavioral) and variables were selected. The cognitive domain includes cognition, meta-cognition, and problem-solving. The motivational domain composed of intrinsic and future-oriented motivation and self-efficacy. The behavioral domain composed of seeking assistance, physical environmental management, and time management. The self-directed learning ability test that could be taken by elementary school students to adult learners. The procedure included preliminary surveys (N=160) and a main survey (N=400) with 45 items. The collected data were analyzed through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis for validation.

Suyeon Kim
Soongsil University
South Korea

She is a doctoral student of Soongsil University, and elementary school teacher. She majored in gifted education.

Hyesung Park
Soongsil University
South Korea

She is a doctoral student of Soongsil University, and high school teacher. She majored in gifted education.

Kyunghwa Lee
Soongsil University
South Korea

She is a professor of Soongsil University and take a role as a dean of Graduate School of Education, director of institue of Gifed Education, Sejong Institute of Gifted and Talented Education. Also She was a president of Korea Association for Gifted Education.


 

 

137 Difference in Bullying and Victimization Between Academically Gifted and Normal Group: Multi-group Analysis of Cross-Sectional Latent Means and Longitudinal Stability
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This presentation will examine if there is any difference in bullying and victimization between the academically gifted and normal groups. For cross-sectional differences, multi-group analysis of latent means was used. For longitudinal differences, multi-group auto-regression models were used. With Korean secondary students (gifted=164, normal=3,484) for 3 waves (Grades 7-9), we found no differences except for the longitudinal stability of victimization. The victimization of gifted at 7th grade were found to be more crucial in predicting subsequent victimizations, especially at 9th grade, than the normal group. This result implies the need for early intervention to prevent chronic victimization of the gifted.

Byeong-Ho Choi
Seoul National University
South Korea

-B.A., Department of Law, Korean National Police University, Yongin, South Korea – Research Interests: Bullying in schools, Juvenile delinquency, Peer Influences, Social development, Peer Relations.

Seon-Young Lee
Seoul National University
South Korea

-Ph.D., The University of Georgia, Department of Educational Psychology, Gifted and Creative Education Program, Athens, GA, USA -M.A., Seoul National University, Department of Education, Seoul, South Korea -B.A., Yonsei University, Department of Psychology, Seoul, South Korea – Seon-Young Lee, Ph.D., is an associate professor of the Department of Education at Seoul National University in Seoul, South Korea. Previously, she was a faculty member of Yonsei University in South Korea and a research assistant professor at Northwestern University’s Center for Talent Development.


 

 

55 Differentiated Curriculum using conceptual frameworks, inquiry-based learning and the Australian Curriculum
Parallel Session, Programming

Attendees of this workshop will be provided with insights about a bespoke Train the Trainer model that supports teachers in the development of a sound understanding of evidence-based best practice in gifted and talented education that aligns with current research and the Australian curriculum. Attendees will gain insights into the collaborative development of tiered teaching and learning activities and formative assessment using Bloom’s Taxonomy. A case study will showcase how students have engaged with a conceptual framework and the Williams Model to enhance critical and creative thinking and drive inquiry.

Kath Morwitch
The Association of Independent Schools of the ACT
Australia

Following 30 years as an educator and leader in a range of ACT schools, Kath is currently the Senior Manager of Curriculum and Professional Learning at the Association of Independent Schools of the ACT. In this role Kath provides advice to 18 member schools on issues related to the Australian Curriculum and quality teaching and learning. She has developed and manages a suite of professional learning opportunities for teachers across member schools and the broader ACT education community that contribute to the development, implementation and evaluation of local and national education reform and innovation initiatives.

Alex Galland
Canberra Girls Grammar School
Australia

Alex is currently the Head of Learning and Innovation at Canberra Girls Grammar School (Junior School). In this role, she works closely with teaching teams planning the written, taught and assessed curriculum, ensuring rigour and differentiation within an International Baccalaureate PYP (Primary Years Programme) framework. Alex presents regularly at national and international conferences, and is an International Baccalaureate Workshop Leader and School Visitor, as well as a Google for Education Certified Trainer. A committed driver of change, Alex received an ACEL Educational Leadership Award in 2015.

Lisa Cockerill
Canberra Girls Grammar School
Australia

Lisa is the Head of Academic Engagement at Canberra Girls Grammar School (Junior School). She and her team work closely with teachers, school assistants, parents and outside agencies to identify, address, maintain and evaluate student engagement programs. She does this within the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program (PYP), ensuring both the academic and wellbeing needs of students are being met.


 

 

121 Differentiated Group Work on heightening Continuing Motivation for High Ability Ecoliteracy Learners
Parallel Session, Advocacy

Year 2 Integrated Programme students at a Singapore Secondary School attend an Ecoliteracy module to foster greater passion, appreciate environmental conservation and sustainable living through advocacy. They were administered a Continuing Motivation (CM) survey before the module started. The Motivation Teaching Model (Dornyei, 2009) teaches students the facts of the Colony Collapse Disorder. With guidance, students form groups and brainstorm solutions to save the dwindling bee population. Each class had a differentiated group activity to tailor learning and better motivate students to brainstorm for solutions. The difference between the pre-survey and post-survey CM score (after the group work) was calculated.

Chee Yong Travis Tan
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School
Singapore

Travis is a 7 year old biology and chemistry teacher with the Ministry of Education and has taught in mainstream middle schools in Singapore. He has a deep interest in mentoring students for their research and learning new pedagogies to better engage his high ability learners. He has presented a paper in the 21st World Gifted Conference 2015.

Huining Joyce Zhuang
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School
Singapore

Joyce has taught biology in middle school for more than 7 years and is a great advocate of ecoliteracy. She heads the environmental committee in her school and works with numerous staff to champion the importance of ecological balance and doing her part to make a difference to the world. Passionate in her dealing with students, Joyce is an efficient Year Head who handles the pastoral care of all her cohort students. She is patient and a has a big heart for students who crossed her path.


 

 

113 Diversified Model of Identifying Gifted Students: An Exploratory Study in India Classrooms
Parallel Session, G&T

This presentation reviews the detailed description and findings of a national level project, funded by the Office of Principal Scientific Advisor to the Government of India, that aims to develop indigenous tools and methods to identify children who have high academic potentials and develop pathways to nurture the potentials into academic excellence. The presentation explains the steps of standardizing the process of identification that has been tried out on a sample of approximately 56,000 students from grade V-IX. It further brings out the “Diversified Model of Identification of Gifted Students” and battery of identification instruments developed during the study.

Jyoti Sharma
University of Delhi
India

Jyoti Sharma ( Ph.D) is an Associate Professor at Cluster Innovation Centre, University of Delhi. She is teaching M.Sc ( Mathematics Education) program in the university. She is actively involved in research and innovation in the field of Mathematics Pedagogy and Education of Gifted Students. She is currently Principal Investigator and Project Coordinator of a government funded national level project on developing indigenous methods to identify high potential children in the country. She is also involved in developing innovative strategies to mentor highly gifted students.


 

 

381 Do ability grouping and acceleration damage self-esteem? How ability grouping turns little fish into big fish
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This study examined shifts in self-esteem in three groups of Australian students enrolled in their first year of secondary school, students in comprehensive (mixed ability) schools, students in selective high schools (fulltime ability grouping) and students in selective high schools who were also collapsing the first two grades into one, a synthesis of ability grouping and acceleration. Interestingly this last group was the only group in the study that did not experience a significant dip in self-esteem.

Miraca Gross
University of New South Wales
Australia

Professor Miraca Gross is Emeritus Professor of Gifted Education in UNSW’s School of Education as well as Director of GERRIC. She is recognised nationally and internationally as a leading authority on the education of gifted and talented students.

She began her career as a teacher and has 22 years’ experience as a classroom teacher and school administrator in State education systems in Scotland and Australia. For 12 years, she was a specialist teacher of gifted and talented children in several different classroom settings, including the regular classroom, cluster grouped classes, pullout programs, and full-time classes.


 

 

183 Do short term programs have a place in providing for gifted children?
Symposium, Social/Emotional

This symposium will provide details about a range of short term enrichment/extension programs offered in 5 states/territories around Australia during the past 5 – 10 years, including weekend camps, regular monthly support groups, and term long one-day programs. In all cases, one of the main goals of the program is to support the social and emotional development and psychological well-being of those attending. The presentation details selection criteria and nature of the group and will provide both qualitative and quantitative data. This data has been collected with standardised tools, questionnaires, and anecdotal data from parents and participants.

Helen Dudeney
AUSTRALIAN GIFTED SUPPORT CENTRE
Australia

Helen is a private educational consultant who has been actively involved in working with gifted children, their parents and teachers since 1990. During this time she has designed and run enrichment and social skills workshops and camps for 3 –16 year old gifted children and their families. She has lectured in Gifted Education in NSW & WA. Her consultancy specialises not only in gifted children, but also twice exceptional students including those who are visual spatial learners. She has a Diploma in Counselling, Certificate of Gifted Education (UNSW), and a Masters of Adult Education (UTS).

Lyndal Reid
AUSTRALIAN GIFTED SUPPORT CENTRE
Australia

Lyndal is a private educational consultant who has been actively working with gifted and twice-exceptional children, their families and schools since 2008. During this time she has assisted in designing and running programs in schools; running social skills workshops and camps; designing and running support/social groups for both older and younger children and families; and developing and running the One Day Enrichment Program in ACT and Perth. She has a Certificate IV in Business and a Diploma of Counselling and is the parent of 4 twice-exceptional children.

Carolyn Giles
BORN TO SOAR
Australia

Carolyn Giles an experienced and innovative educator, founded Born to Soar in 2013, providing educational learning opportunities for gifted students through Centres for Gifted and Talented (One Day Schools) located in Melbourne, virtual classrooms reaching gifted students across Australia and Asia and professional learning for teachers in gifted education. Currently holding positions as Talent Development Coordinator at Carey Baptist Grammar School; the Vice-President of the Victorian Association for Gifted and Talented Children and the Victorian head of Future Problem Solving Australia; she is a parent of gifted children and passionately advocates for gifted families and the teachers who support them.

Adrienne Alexander
EXTENSION EDUCATION ONE DAY SCHOOL FOR GIFTED CHILDREN
Australia

Adrienne is a fully trained primary teacher, with 19 years’ teaching experience in primary and secondary schools in New Zealand and Australia. Adrienne has worked closely with the Otago Association for Gifted Children, running holiday camps including the Prometheus Computer Camps and the Kingswood Medieval Camp. She has facilitated children’s workshops for Sunshine Coast Gifted Children and Mensa. She is completing her Master’s in Gifted Education while also working as a private teacher for exceptionally and profoundly gifted children. Adrienne also works as a voluntary education officer for the Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology teaching archaeology to school students.

Anne Grant
BORN TO SOAR
Australia

Anne has taught in the early childhood field for many years. She has worked with children who have a range of abilities from those identified as gifted through to children with severe developmental delay. She lectures at university level in gifted and early childhood education, at both undergraduate and post graduate level. Anne co-authored the DEECD online Resource “Making a Difference for Young Gifted and Talented Children” and is currently involved in writing on the educational needs of young gifted children.


 

 

105 Doctoral Level Education: Impact and Influences
Parallel Session, Leadership

Does doctoral level education influence our field of gifted education? What are the impacts on gifted students, the classroom, schools, and districts? How do research based contributions influence our work? Doctoral level education is examined for impact and influence through an analysis of doctoral level training including doctoral students’ change in perceived competency levels of gifted expertise, progression of identifying and solving complex persistent problems of practice, and impact projects designed and implemented in the field. A conceptual shift beyond student-service data is proposed. Replication recommendations are offered and implications for policy reform are discussed.

Norma Hafenstein
University of Denver
United States

Dr. Hafenstein is the Daniel L. Ritchie Endowed Chair in Gifted Education at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. Her career spans numerous positions in leadership and scholarship. She is Full Clinical Professor in the Teaching and Learning Sciences Department, founded Ricks Center for Gifted Children, a PS-8 school, in 1984, and founded the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education in 1997. Dr. Hafenstein is recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented and the Outstanding Service to the University Award from the University of Denver. She presents extensively on giftedness.

Julia Watson-Barnett
University of Denver/ Colorado Department of Education
United States

Julia Watson, PhD, serves as the Gifted Education Regional Consultant for 19 school districts in NW Colorado and as a researcher and professor at the University of Denver. She has been an educator for 40 years, as a teacher (K-college), administrator, staff development, teacher-coach, and district facilitator. She has worked in Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, Arkansas, Nebraska, and 13 years in Hawaii. Her areas of expertise include Curriculum, Assessment, Leadership, and Gifted/Talented. She was nominated as Outstanding Educator of the Year, for Outstanding Dissertation (1997) and has been inducted into the Colorado Academy of Educators for Gifted, Talented, & Creative.

Justine Lopez
University of Denver
United States

Justine López, MA, is a doctoral candidate at the University of Denver. She is currently a member of the Right4Rural Research Team/Javits Grant, examining the impact of school/district leaders on the identification of underrepresented gifted students in rural areas. Her teaching experneince includes affiliate faculty at Regis University’s Dual Language Program; Department of Marketing, The Colorado Women’s College, Multicultural Voices of Discovery at the University of Denver; and Graphic Arts instructor at the Community College of Denver. Her leadership perspectives align with her 15+ years as a business owner, educating, leading, building, implementing, and guiding non-profit and for-profit business ventures.

Kristina Hesbol
University of Denver
United States

Kristina A. Hesbol is Assistant Professor in the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Department at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. She has taught preK-graduate school, has served as a principal of three multi-lingual, multi-cultural schools, coordinated school improvement for a diverse school district, and served as a district Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Hesbol earned her Ph.D. at Loyola University (Chicago), and currently serves as a member of the Right4Rural Research Team, examining the impact of school and district leaders on the identification of culturally and linguistically diverse rural students.


 

 

15 Early Childhood Educator Attitudes towards Giftedness and Early Entry
Parallel Session, Programming

This research is a follow-up to a 1990 study and explores the changes, if any, in NSW based Australian early childhood educators’ knowledge and attitudes to gifted pre-schoolers. The earlier study focused on labelling, programming, and early childhood educator beliefs. These themes have been expanded to include Early Entry to school and to examine whether responses differ according to educator qualification levels. This research also seeks to identify gaps in early childhood service provisions for gifted children where programming is based solely on Australia’s currently approved National Quality Framework. The presentation includes helpful recommendations based on the findings.

Mimi Wellisch
Clever Kids Consultancy
Australia

Mimi Wellisch, PhD, holds degrees in Psychology and Early Childhood. She taught pre-schoolers for over 2 decades and later worked for DoCS, licencing and regulating NSW children’s services. Mimi has a passionate interest in gifted children, and has conducted research about NSW early childhood teacher attitudes towards gifted pre-schoolers and on the connection between IQ and attachment. Mimi is author of books and peer reviewed as well as other journal articles, and has presented at many local and international conferences. Mimi is a registered psychologist and Director of Clever Kids Consultancy, a consultancy for parents of young gifted children.


 

 

303 Early Childhood Inclusion in Care Giving: Exploration into Policy and Practice for Gifted Children
Parallel Session, Parenting

This research is concerned with early childhood inclusion in care giving. Inclusion is an approach to children with diverse abilities ensuring that they can live, play, and learn together. Using a mixed methods approach that combines quantitative and qualitative research techniques, we identify and analyze explicit and implicit policy and practice of inclusion regarding gifted children in Bangladesh. The research attempts to add to existing knowledge in the field of inclusion as well as inform policy and practice.

Mahal Hosne Tilat*

She is involved in teaching as lecturer of sociology at the People’s University of Bangladesh. Completing a fellowship program on development research, she has done several works with children. Her outstanding research experiences are with SOS Children’s Village, Early Concern and ADECS. She has published a number of articles. Her interest are street children, children without parenting care, photography,visual art and visual ethnography,care giving and giftedness. Currently she is doing her M. Phil thesis in the University of Dhaka. Post address is: Department of Sociology & Social Work,The People’s University of Bangladesh, 3/2 Asad Avenue, Mohammadpur, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh

Zahirul Islam
Jahangirnagar University
Bangladesh

Zahirul Islam is a researcher about giftedness. Currently, he is Ph D Researcher at the Department of Anthropology, Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh. He obtained his M. Phil on early childhood. He is WCGTC delegate in Bangladesh, working as Scientist in Early Concern, and worked with UNDP, Plan, UNICEF, GIZ, Save the Children, Sesame Workshop, SOS Children’s Village. He has several international publications.

Hossain Md. Monir*

Mr. Hossain is working as a teacher (Sr. Lecturer) in department of sociology at the People’s University of Bangladesh. He has successfully completed a fellowship program on development research with children. His interest of area includes parenting, disability and poverty, care giving and giftedness. In doing several research works with children his research experiences are with development organizations – national & international. He is pursuing his M. Phil degree from Dhaka University. Post address is: Department of Sociology & Social Work,The People’s University of Bangladesh, 3/2 Asad Avenue, Mohammadpur, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh


 

 

27 Early Entrance Program for Saudi Accelerated Students
Poster, School Alternatives

This study will examine the transferability of the successful practice of an American school for accelerated students to the Saudi context. The US school applies programmes for accelerated students as a form of Early Entrance Program and other special programmes that address the needs of accelerated students in grades 8 – 11. The school will be proposed for Saudi universities that receive government financial allocations.

Jawaher Bin Yousef
University of Southampton
United Kingdom

Jawaher Bin Yousef is a P.h.D student in the Southampton Education School at the University of Southampton. Her research interests focus on gifted education, acceleration, gifted schools, academies, and innovation in education.


 

 

318 Educating Gifted Learners at Home: Perspectives and Lived Experiences
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Parents of gifted children are increasingly expressing concern about the education of high ability students in America’s public schools. Many of these parents are exploring alternative educational options for meeting their gifted children’s unique learning and social/emotional needs. This trend is reflected in the fact that the most rapidly growing segment of the homeschooling population represents those who choose homeschooling for academic reasons. This session discusses the findings of a qualitative study that explored the lived experiences and perspectives of families who homeschool their gifted children. Implications for parents and educators will be shared and discussed.

Charlton Wolfgang
Millersville University
United States

Charlton Wolfgang, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Gifted Education and Coordinator of the M.Ed. in Gifted Education Program at Millersville University in Millersville, Pennsylvania, USA. At Millersville University he teaches graduate and undergraduate gifted education courses, as well as STEM education courses. His research interests include Gifted Education and STEM Education.


 

 

341 Educational alchemy: How project-based learning and an ancient mystery transformed gifted children into a team
Parallel Session, Programming

Designed on a shoestring budget in a small US school for K-6 gifted students, the Antikythera project offered a “perfect storm” of gifted student passions: LEGOs, computers, math, astronomy, engineering, ancient history, and mystery. The reproduction of an ancient Greek analogue computer using LEGO involved every student in the school, and created a sense of community, quantum leaps in teamwork and collaboration, and other social-emotional synergies that no one expected. Project-based learning, recognized as a best practice in gifted education, yielded results far more profound and lasting than the remarkable endproduct.

Allyson O’Rourke-Barrett
The Grayson School
United States

Allyson O’Rourke-Barrett is Director of Project-Based Learning at The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. Her role allows her to merge her love for interdisciplinary instruction with student-centered lessons.  In Grayson’s inaugural year, Ms. O’Rourke-Barrett spearheaded the “Grayson in Space” initiative, which included collaboration with the International Space Station and a whole-school “Mission to Mars” simulation.  Additionally, she served as the faculty advisor for the SuperKNOWvas, Grayson’s Destination Imagination team, whom she led to first place at the state championship.   This year, she can be found trying to solve mysteries or building robots and orreries.

Jill Williford Wurman
The Grayson School
United States

Jill Williford Wurman is Director of Research at The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. At Grayson, she acts as the in-house resource for the most current understanding on gifted education topics relevant to the school community, including academic performance, pedagogy, social-emotional development, longitudinal outcomes, and best practices in gifted education. She has spoken to the American Psychological Association’s national convention regarding summer residential programs for the gifted, and has co-presented on giftedness at MIT and at SENG’s national conference.


 

 

83 Effective Programming for Developing Talents among Underserved Populations
Symposium, G&T

Panelists showcase research-based programming models effective in developing talents among underserved populations and engage in discussion with audience members. Presentations are followed by facilitated interaction among panelists and audience members. Specific models presented include STEAM Labs, Toy Labs, The Scholar Identity Model™, Total School Cluster Grouping, Out-of-school Enrichment Programs, and Online gifted education Staff Development Modules.

Nielsen Pereira
Purdue University
United States

Assistant Professor of Gifted, Creative, and Talented Education at Purdue University. His research interests include the design and assessment of learning in varied gifted and talented education contexts, understanding gifted and talented student experiences in talent development programs, and conceptual and measurement issues in the identification of gifted and talented populations. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Gifted and Talented International and on the editorial board member for the Journal of Advanced Academics and Gifted Child Quarterly. He taught English as a second language for 12 years in public schools and language institutes in Brazil.

Marcia Gentry
Purdue University
United States

professor of Educational Studies, directs the Gifted Education Research Institute at Purdue University. She actively participates in NAGC and AERA, frequently contributes to the literature, has national and international partnerships, and regularly serves as a speaker and consultant. Marcia received multiple grants in support of her work with low-SES, Native American, and underrepresented gifted youth. Her research interests include student attitudes toward school; using cluster-grouping and differentiation to meet the needs of gifted youth while helping all students achieve at high levels; non-traditional settings for talent development; and the development and recognition of talent among underserved populations.

Gilman W. Whiting
Vanderbilt University
United States

Associate Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies and Director of Graduate Studies at Vanderbilt University. His areas of research include: race, sports, and American culture; educational disparity; welfare reform and fatherhood initiatives; special and gifted education. Whiting has authored over forty scholarly articles in journals such as Roeper Review, Journal for Secondary Gifted Education, and The International Journal of Sport and Society, and book chapters. Whiting is the creator of the Scholar Identity Model™; consults with school districts nationally and internationally; and is the founding chair of the Achievement Gap Institute for the George W. Peabody College of Education.

Yukiko Maeda
Purdue University
United States

Associate Professor of Research Design and Methodology. Her research promotes understanding, establishing and disseminating best practices in the use of data in educational research. She is expertise in meta-analysis and multilevel modeling. Her recent research contributions include understanding data use at school settings for decision making and identifying and presenting remedies for methodological issues for data analysis.

Jennifer Richardson
Purdue University
United States

Professor in the Learning Design and Technology (LDT) program at Purdue University. Her research focus on best practices in design for online and distance learning and the Community of Inquiry (CoI). She was recently awarded the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) Fellow award for her leadership in the field and has received the AERA SIG Instructional Technology Leadership Award, the Sloan-C Effective Practices in Online Education Award, and more locally the Excellence in Distance Teaching Award at Purdue University. Richardson is also active in the mentoring of graduate students to design and teach online.


 

 

59 Elements that help or hinder the achievement of academically gifted and talented secondary school boys
Parallel Session, Misc

This presentation explores how society, schools and teachers, family, and students’ own intrapersonal characteristics have impacted the academic achievement of 31 academically gifted and talented New Zealand secondary school boys (American and Australian, Grade 8). The mixed-methods pilot study is particularly pertinent given that the most recent annual report of the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (2016) shows a clear divergence in achievement between males and females in the upper secondary school. Overall, the most significant trends in the study’s findings relate to schools. These, and the other strong trends, will be discussed.

Graeme Miller

New Zealand

Biography: Graeme Miller has a long-time passion for gifted education. He is an experienced educator. Prior to 2006 Graeme was a teacher/principal in eight different primary schools in both the North and South Islands of New Zealand. From 2006 to 2013 Graeme was the Dean of Advanced Learning Programmes at Hamilton Boys’ High School where he oversaw the academic programmes of over a thousand boys. In 2014 and 2015 Graeme was a full time PhD student at the University of Waikato. After two years of day-relief teaching, he is currently Acting Principal of Waipa Christian School (a primary school).


 

 

190 Embedding gifted education in regional pre-service teacher education
Parallel Session, G&T

Giftedness is not a topic that receives much coverage in pre-service teacher education programs within Australia, particularly in regional areas. Very few universities embed core units in their teacher education degrees, and even those offering elective units are sparse. A lack of understanding of giftedness has been related to less positive attitudes, inappropriate provision, and lack of support for gifted students. This paper will present a range of research findings from a longitudinal project in a regional university in Victoria, Australia, related to attempts to increase awareness and understanding of giftedness and gifted education in pre-service teacher education.

Margaret Plunkett
Federation University, Australia
Australia

Associate Professor Margaret Plunkett is the Associate Dean (Learning & Teaching) for the Faculty of Education and Arts at Federation University, Australia. Margaret has developed and taught courses in gifted education for which she has won a number of teaching awards including the Pearson/ATEA Teacher Educator of the Year (2012) and an Office of Learning and Teaching Citation (2014). Her main research interests include professional learning for teachers, engagement of gifted students and curriculum innovation. Margaret is an elected Australian delegate on the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, and Associate Editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

117 Enabling Cultures for Acceleration: Gifted Girls in Single-Sex Secondary Schools in New Zealand
Poster, G&T

Research has demonstrated that there are barriers to the implementation of academic acceleration as an educational intervention and that gifted girls have special needs. The study focused on acceleration and its effectiveness and provisions provided for gifted girls. Perceptions of teachers, parents or caregivers, and students were sought from three case study schools, different in type, socioeconomic decile, and size. Research instruments included online surveys, focus group, and individual interviews. Effectiveness of provision was attributed to the school’s cultures of learning, excellence and challenge, and the culture of care and well-being. Flexibility, consultation and student choice were key factors.

Margaret Crawford

New Zealand

Margaret Crawford completed a Doctorate of Education in 2016 through Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand. Her thesis focused on acceleration and gifted girls in single-sex girls’ schools which offer secondary education (Years 9-13, ages 13-18) in New Zealand. Prior qualifications included Masters of Educational Administration (Hons), Masters of Arts (Hons) in English and a Diploma in Teaching. She was awarded a Woolf Fisher Fellowship for excellence in the teaching of English. As a researcher, secondary teacher and parent of gifted children she has learnt and believes that every student has the right to learn something new each day.


 

 

374 Enabling parents, enabling children
Parallel Session, Advocacy

In 2015, I led advocacy by way of parent guided study groups about giftedness. Seeking to shift parent support meetings towards more productive and sustainable learning opportunities, I set about to embed facilitated guided study groups using six key areas of understanding giftedness to not only provide a pathway for parents to understand their gifted children, but to enable them to have credible conversations with key educational stakeholders. This session will review the data collected, share the model that was implemented, and how parent education contributes to a better understanding of the social, emotional, and educational needs of gifted learners.

Julia Bailey
Darra State School
Australia

Julia Bailey (MEd, BTeach, DipHRM) understands firsthand the frustration many parents feel as they navigate education for their gifted children – she brings an authentic and compassionate approach to this dilemma by encouraging parents to become as educated as possible on the needs of their gifted children. Julia continues to push the boundaries of conventional school processes by seeking to identify gifted learners before they become disengaged to ensure access to their learning is commensurate with their ability. Julia has a special interest in giftedness in children who have experienced trauma and aspires to contribute to this field of research.


 

 

357 Equity and Excellence in Gifted Education: Meeting the needs of underserved learners
Parallel Session, Diversity

Giftedness exists in all populations of students, regardless of cultural, linguistic, or economic differences. Bright students who are economically disadvantaged, from minority backgrounds, or who are learning English as a second language are often overlooked, unidentified, and do not receive appropriate programming and services to help them reach their potential.

April Wells
School District U-46
United States

April Wells is the Coordinator for Gifted in Illinois School District U-46. April serves on the Board of Directors for the Illinois Association for Gifted Children, has presented for the National Association for Gifted Children and the College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education. Interests focus on equity pedagogy, developing gifted continuum of services that allow students to maximize their pursuits. April has a bachelor’s degree in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from DePaul University, a master’s in Teaching and a master’s Administration and Supervision from National Louis University. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated.


 

 

248 Essential Connections: Inspiring and Promoting Creative Teacher Leadership to Transform Gifted Education
Symposium, Leadership

What essential knowledge, skills, connections, and dispositions are needed by teachers of the gifted in a global and digital age of accountability and international comparative studies? Beyond this question is the urgent need to transform gifted education to engage teachers and learners in mutual creative problem-solving to address global challenges. This symposium will examine the role of the teacher and address this complex question in 4 parts: developing creative leadership; teaching and learning using authentic and virtual connections; examining “craft knowledge” and professional workplace learning; and the assessment of intervention strategies to promote creativity in training teachers of the gifted.

Gillian Eriksson
University of Central Florida
United States

Gillian Eriksson, Ph.D. is a Lecturer/Coordinator of Gifted Education, at the University of Central Florida. She was a South African then USA delegate to the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, has presented at 14 World Gifted conferences. She is a consultant editor and widely published in gifted education. She is the PI for Project ELEVATE (Jacob K. Javits Grant). She coordinates study programs to The Netherlands, England, and South Africa. She has received awards for UCF Women of Excellence for Global Achievement (2016); Teaching Excellence; Golden Psi Award of Excellence (APA); Internationalization; Minority Mentorship and a Fulbright scholarship.

Dorothy Sisk
Lamar University
United States

Dr. Dorothy Sisk is the author and co-author of eleven books, including: The Growing Person, Intuition: An Inner Way of Knowing, Leadership Making Things Happen; Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom and Spiritual Intelligence: Developing Higher Consciousness; A Futures Primer; Leadership: A special type of Giftedness; Enhancing the gift of Leadership; Collective Literacy: Using Gifted Strategies to Enrich Learning for Every Student; and Creative Teaching of the Gifted and Making Great Kids Greater. Her articles appear in the major journals of gifted education including: Understanding Our Gifted, Roeper Review, Gifted and Talented International, Gifted Education International, and Tempo.

Margaret Sutherland
University of Glasgow
United Kingdom

Dr. Margaret Sutherland lectures at the University of Glasgow. She is the Director of the Scottish Network for Able Pupils and Deputy Director of the Centre for Research and Development in Adult and Lifelong Learning with 33 years teaching experience. She has written papers, chapters and books in gifted education including, Gifted and Talented in the Early Years. She speaks at conferences and has worked across the UK and in Tanzania; Malawi; Korea; Virginia, USA; Slovenia; The Netherlands; Poland and Denmark. She is an elected member of the general committee of ECHA and an Executive member of the WCGTC.


 

 

5 Ethics of care in the construction of giftedness
Parallel Session, G&T

This presentation draws from the findings of a doctoral study investigating different constructions of giftedness in Aotearoa, New Zealand. The data were collected through a national online survey, interviews, and from a Facebook closed-group discussion. One set of constructions was about care ethics and how sustained relationships can help to meet the needs of gifted children. The study’s participants believe that relationships are an important element of working with gifted children. This presentation aims to start the conversation about care ethics in constructions of giftedness, and how important relationships are in terms of supporting gifted children, families, and teachers.

Melanie Wong
University of Canterbury
New Zealand

Mel is a research coordinator in the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences, Manukau Institute of Technology, New Zealand. She is also a PhD candidate at the College of Education, University of Canterbury. Her research interests include gifted education, inclusive education and sociology in education. Mel serves on the editorial boards and/or reviews for journals. She is currently editing an education book funded by Manukau Institute of Technology. Mel sits on different NGO committees advocating for children, youth and their families.


 

 

283 Every Child can become a Gifted Child
Parallel Session, G&T

Every child is a Gifted Child Learning to know, do, collaborate and be are the four key dimensions of education. We need to shift our focus from identifying and serving Gifted children to CREATING Gifted Children. Play, passion and purpose are three components of education to create Gifted children. Adoption of Montessori which promtes play and freedom to EXPLORE, Emergent Curriculum, and Multiple Intelligences will create miracles. GEAR is a living model of creating Gifted Children.

Srinivasan Muthusamy
GEAR Innovative Intl. School, Bangalore
India

Dr M Srinivasan Left Engineering and took up education. Have established a model of education to make every child a Gifted child. Known all over the world.  National Delegate to World Conference at HongKong.  Founder and Chairman. GEAR Innovative Intl. School, Bangalore  Propounder – School Beyond Walls – School Model, CIPE- Creative Inventive productive Excelment – Education Model, which are being implemented at GEAR.

 40 years of experience with children, researching and training  Masters in Gifted Education, National Research Center on Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut, USA  D. Litt from Dharwad University, India.


 

 

79 Examining Critical Issues in Gifted Education: A Case Study Approach
Parallel Session, G&T

During this session, the presenters will provide an overview of the characteristics of high quality professional development and the components of a case study which connects formal learning with authentic situations. They will introduce problem-based scenarios as a vehicle to initiate exploration of critical issues in the education of gifted and talented learners. The presenters will model the presentation of a case study, with a dilemma that will engage the education professional and encourage detailed analysis and critical reflection. The methodologies presented will include discussion questions, activities, and further investigations intended to extend learning and enhance understanding.

Wendy A Behrens
Minnesota Department of Education
United States

Wendy Behrens is the Gifted and Talented Education Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Education. She presents frequently on the nature and needs of gifted learners, instructional strategies, service design, and policies that support highly able learners. She has co-authored several books and is an invited speaker in the United States, Middle East, Far East, and Europe. She is President of the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted, a CEC-TAG Board Member, delegate to the World Council, and an advisor for the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University and the Grayson School.

Christine L. Weber
University of North Florida
United States

Christine L. Weber, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Childhood Education, Literacy, and TESOL at the University of North Florida, U.S., with a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A&M University. Dr. Weber has been a member of the Editorial Review Board for Gifted Child Today since 1998. Her recent books, with co-authors Cecelia Boswell and Wendy Behrens, include Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners: A Case Studies Approach (2016) and Exploring Critical Issues in Gifted Education: A Case Studies Approach (2014). She also co-authored a book chapter “Gifted students and advanced readers” in Ebooks for Elementary School (2015). ​


 

 

258 Examining Self-Determination in Graduates Who Entered College Early
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Early entrance to college is one of many accelerative options available for highly advanced students. Unlike academic adjustment and performance, social and emotional well-being of students who enter college early may be of great concern for parents and prospective students. Self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) sheds light on the importance of psychological well-being. In this session, the presenters will highlight the findings from a mixed-methods study that examined outcomes of early entrance to college. The presenters will share recommendations about developing a nurturing environment where early entrance students’ self-determination can grow.

Nancy Hertzog
The University of Washington Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars
United States

Dr. Nancy Hertzog is Professor in the area of Educational Psychology at the University of Washington, and the Director of the Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars. She has an extensive background in gifted education and expertise on curriculum differentiation and development. From 1995-2010 she directed University Primary School at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books, several chapters, and has published in the Journal of Curriculum Studies, Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, Roeper Review, Teaching Exceptional Children, Early Childhood Research and Practice, and Young Exceptional Children.

Rachel U. Mun*

Dr. Rachel U. Mun is Assistant Professor at the University of North Texas in Educational Psychology (concentration in Gifted and Talented).  Her research interests are best described as an intersection between gifted education, mental health and immigrant issues.  She has examined social and emotional development, immigration, parental influences, career decision-making and educational access for special populations of gifted learners. Most recently, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Research on Gifted Education (NCRGE) at the University of Connecticut, conducting research on identifying and serving underrepresented gifted learners.

Sakhavat Mammadov*

Sakhavat Mammadov, PhD, is a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Washington Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars. Dr. Mammadov has worked with gifted children and their families for many years in a variety of contexts. His research interests focus on the social-emotional lives of gifted children, personality, motivation, and administrative and policy issues in gifted education. He is the recipient of the 2015 National Association for Gifted Children Doctoral Student Award and the Armand J. & Mary Faust Galfo Education Research Fellowship.


 

 

236 Existential Group Work: Meeting Affective Needs for the Gifted
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Group work can allow gifted students opportunities to share and discover the universality of their affective needs and expressions. Gifted students need guidance in dealing with their emotions, gaining responsibility, and discovering their own direction and purpose in life. Existential philosophy addresses finding purpose. Existential group work can provide an environment that is uniquely suited for the gifted as they can engage in abstract thinking, complexity, and ambiguity while exploring emotions and dealing with life issues. This presentation provides information of how existential group work has been beneficial for the gifted as they meet their affective needs.

Paula Christensen
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
United States

Dr. Paula Christensen is an Associate Professor at Northwestern State University of Louisiana in Natchitoches. She teaches graduate courses at NSU in gifted education, counseling, and student affairs in higher education. She is a National Certified Counselor with a strong background in counseling with gifted children and adults and teaching middle school gifted students. Dr. Christensen has also engaged in research studies regarding the processes of gifted students reaching their potential. Her passion for reading and for gifted students has led to a wonderful blending of studying both.


 

 

336 Experiences in unleashing talent of twice-exceptional students in a homeschooled situation
Parallel Session, 2e

We applied various strategies from an afterschool program for gifted children into a homeschool setting for twice exceptional children. The goal was to create the environment to nurture children’s abilities without allowing the learning difficulties to stunt their development. We will analyze different strategies and give advice about how to develop afterschool programs for homeschooled children. This program creates opportunities to nurture talent. These successful strategies allow students to develop their academic, social, and emotional sides. Students turn into well rounded individuals with the ability to think and make the best choices. Students develop into intrinsic, self-motivated lifelong learners.

Raquel Bronsoler
UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS NIÑOS
Mexico

I started and developed an afterschool program specially tailored to teach children with special abilities. There were very few or non existent programs for gifted children. It was created to contribute to the understanding of the behavioral characteristics of gifted children while nurturing their talents. The workshop programs have enabled gifted children to discover themselves as individuals. To become thinkers and creators who are not afraid to be themselves. Most of our alumni have a taproot gained in our program which has lead them as respectable, successful individuals using their abilities to benefit themselves and society.


 

 

343 Exploring the relationship between intelligence and popularity: The social and academic popularity of gifted elementary students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

One purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between intelligence and sociometric status of young learners in elementary schools. Another purpose was to document the differences in social and academic popularity between gifted students and their peers. Participants included 3,335 elementary students, 643 identified as gifted, in grades two through four in 20 schools in Turkey. The summary of the statistical analysis indicated significant correlation between intelligence and social and academic popularity. Also the summary of the MANOVA analysis indicated significant differences in the social and academic popularity between these gifted and non-gifted students.

Abdulkadir Bahar
University of Wisconsin
United States

Kadir Bahar is an assistant professor of gifted education at UW-Stevens Point. After graduating summa cum laude from Bilkent University with a degree in industrial engineering, he completed his Ph.D. in Special Education with a focus on Gifted Education at the University of Arizona. His research interests include education of gifted students, problem solving, mathematical ability, and talent development. Professor Bahar serves as the director of the Youth in College program, which is a summer enrichment experience for high academic ability students.


 

 

130 Familial Influences on the Career Decision-Making Processes of Gifted EFL High School Students in Vietnam
Parallel Session, Guidance

This presentation will outline a study that examined the factors that influence the career decision-making processes of gifted EFL high school students in Vietnam. Specifically, there will be: (i) a review of the factors that contributed to students’ career decision-making processes, (ii) an illustration of the influence of familial influences on the career decision-making processes, and (iii) a discussion of these familial influences from the perspective of Vietnamese history (i.e., changes to the Vietnamese family through different historical periods from the wars, the return to peace, Vietnam’s opening up to the world during Doi Moi (Renovation), to the present).

Hong Cao
University of New South Wales
Australia

Hong, Cao is a PhD candidate in the School of Education, University of New South Wales. Prior to starting her PhD, she worked at Vietnam National University, Hanoi as both a teacher and a teacher trainer in the field of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Hong commenced her PhD in 2014 in the field of gifted education. Her PhD thesis looks at Career Choice Intentions of Gifted EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students in Vietnamese context. She is scheduled to submit her thesis at the end of 2017.

Jae Jung
University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr Jae Yup Jung is a Senior Lecturer, a GERRIC Senior Research Fellow and a former Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow in the School of Education at UNSW. The focus of his research is on the decision-making of gifted adolescents on topics such as careers, university entrance and friendships, usually incorporating motivational and cultural perspectives. His research has been recognised with awards from the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and Mensa International. He is the editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education and a member of the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly and the Journal of Employment Counselling.

Susen Smith
University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr Susen Smith is Senior Lecturer in Gifted and Special Education and GERRIC Senior Research Fellow at the UNSW, Australia. Her research interests include: Differentiating curriculum and pedagogy for gifted students. She has been a visiting scholar at Columbia University, CUNY, and the Hong Kong Institute of Education, guest editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education, is published and keynoted at Australian and international conferences. Susen has acquired several competitive research grants and received the UNE Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Achievements in Interdisciplinary Research Innovation and the UNSW Excellence in Postgraduate Research Award from the UNSW Arc Postgraduate Council.


 

 

233 Family and school connectedness in the development of creative and critical thinking self-efficacy
Parallel Session, Creativity

This study aimed to examine the relationships between family and school connectedness on students’ creative and critical thinking self-efficacy. Academically talented students (n=1,424) from fourth- to sixth grade in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire. Results suggest that both family and school connectedness are positively associated with creative and critical thinking self-efficacy. Although school connectedness accounts for additional variance in creative and critical thinking self-efficacy after controlling for family connectedness, family and school connectedness only account for 18% of the variance in creative and critical thinking self-efficacy. Implications to researchers and educators will be discussed.

Ricci W. Fong
The Education University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Ricci W. Fong (PhD) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the Education University of Hong Kong. Her current research centers on the influence of perfectionism on Chinese students (including the gifted and talented), students’ psychological strengths and well-being development. Her work has been shared in various academic conferences and publications, as well as in schools and professional bodies, such as the Hong Kong Psychological Society (HKPS), the Gifted School Network, and the Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education (HKAGE).


 

 

141 Feniks: a drop-out center for twice exceptional high school students
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Dropping-out of high school is a serious concern for gifted students, especially for twice-exceptional children. They are so creatively gifted they don’t fit in the regular system. The result is an often depressed drop-out with low self-esteem. For those students, drop-out center ‘Feniks Talent’ was founded in the Netherlands. During this session, the director will share his experiences and lessons learned. We will talk about the possibilities of creating a drop-out center and about how the students spend their days. Ample time will be spent discussing how to apply these lessons in your school and country.

Tijl Koenderink
Take on Talents
Netherlands

Tijl Koenderink is an educational author and entrepreneur from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is driven by his own experiences as a child: tremendously bad school results despite an IQ-test score of over 150. To make life better for the young people who are in school now, Tijl started several companies, trained over 500 public schools, set up over 20 full-time gifted programs and created a drop-out center for gifted teenagers. To practice what he preaches, he started his own public school. Tijl is publishing a book called ‘The 7 challenges of the gifted child’ in the US, mid 2017.

Femke Hovinga
Take on Talents
Netherlands

Femke Hovinga had her goal clear since she was a first grader. She was struggling to be her gifted self in school and decided to make the school environment better. Grown-up and eventually a university graduate, Femke founded Talentissimo, the European Platform for the Extremely and Profoundly gifted. She also is co-founder of Take on Talents, an international effort to support parents of gifted children. Besides that, Femke is involved in several efforts in giftedness in the Netherlands.


 

 

340 Finding Control in Chaos: Understanding Perfectionism, Substance Abuse, and Self-Destructive Behaviour in Gifted Students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

The link between perfectionism and gifted students is well documented. However, there is a relative dearth of literature in relation to substance abuse and self-destructive behaviour in this population. Both perfectionism and addiction are indicative of low self-esteem, yet they are also suggestive of grandiosity. This paper explores this paradox, suggesting that for some gifted students such behaviour can be viewed as a ‘disease of disconnection’ or a ‘developmental disorder’; the emergence of an emotional state that demands a pathological self-soothing mechanism. But why do some gifted students develop such dysfunctional behaviours, and what can we do to help them?

Kate Burton
Alchemy Therapy
Australia

Kate Burton provides counselling and psychotherapy from her rooms at West Perth Medical Centre in Western Australia. She completed her doctorate at Murdoch University, focusing on the intersection between giftedness, creativity, trauma and addiction. Prior to moving to Australia in 2009, Kate worked as an associate lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan and The Open University. Kate is a founding committee member of Western Australia’s State Association for the Gifted, Gifted WA.


 

 

111 Forensics@Kristin: Who Dunnit?
Parallel Session, Leadership

One hundred budding investigators come from all over New Zealand in July for Forensics@Kristin, an intensive, student-led programme that challenges participants to solve complex simulated homicide cases. Gifted students from across the country come to embrace the challenge, and test their problem solving, research, and logic skills at this unique camp. Another team of students is responsible for the logistics of running the camp. Catering to everyone, supervising teams, overseeing the science laboratories and general day-to-day running of the camp. Staff are on hand, but it is the students who lead the camp and take responsibility for its ultimate success.

Raewyn Casey
Kristin School
New Zealand

Raewyn Casey is the GaTE co-ordinator of Kristin Middle School in Auckland New Zealand. She is an experienced teacher who has worked with gifted students for fourteen years. Along with colleagues she has created a variety of different programs that cater specifically for gifted children. The forensic camp been one of the most challenging but most rewarding program she has been involved with.


 

 

349 Fostering Creativity in Teaching Gifted Learners Mathematics in Regular Classroom in High Schools
Parallel Session, Creativity

Teaching for creativity has been a learning goal for teachers across all discipline and levels. In South African schools, mathematically gifted learners can make significant contributions to a community. Still they may be at risk of underachieving, unless teachers can derive methods to foster creativity to engage and challenge their abilities. The current education in South Africa supports inclusive education. This presentation reviews literature and previous research intended to discuss some of the methods that can be considered to improve learners’ creativity.

Dimakatso Agnes Mohokare
Central University of Technology
South Africa

I am currently working at Christian Liphoko Secondary School, teaching mathematics and mathematical literacy from grade 10 -12. My passion is to work with learners and get pleasure in seeing them progressing in life. I am in a possession of Bed (Hons) in both management and professional curriculum studies, and currently doing my Masters Degree at Central University of Technology . I want to use my knowledge to assist learners who are struggling especially in mathematics and show them that anyone can archive in life through hard working and extra efforts and through effective teaching and learning


 

 

287 From Reluctant Writer to Masterful Author: Pedagogy that supports the young gifted child’s writing development
Parallel Session, Programming

How do we harness the power of the young gifted child’s imagination and creativity and empower them to become confident masterful authors? Teachers as researchers tracked outcomes and contributed to the advancement of our understanding of gifted pedagogy. Participants will learn about the 5 pronged approach that we used to effectively teach writing to young gifted children. Using illustrative writing samples, we describe the high impact practices that produced tangible improvement in young children’s literacy learning. We challenge participants to re-examine and move beyond their current thoughts and perspectives of teaching writing to young gifted students.

Michelle Bence
Unversity of Calgary
Canada

Michelle has been teaching in gifted education for the last 17 years with a focus on providing qualitatively differentiated programming for gifted learners. Michelle’s other passion is literacy. She shepherds a joint research study with the University of Calgary investigating best practices in writing instruction for gifted students. Michelle is currently completing her Masters through the University of Calgary, researching the effects of teacher professional development on classroom literacy practice.


 

 

330 Gender, levels of intelligence, academic performance, and perfectionism in Indonesia gifted and non-gifted students
Parallel Session, Diversity

Perfectionism is a characteristic commonly associated with gifted individuals. Much has been learned about perfectionism, but few studies have been conducted in Indonesian gifted and non-gifted students population. The current study examines gender, levels of intelligence, and academic performance as predictors of student’s perfectionism. The participants of the study were 169 students ages 18-20 (33 males,136 females) recruited from The Faculty of Psychology in Indonesia. All participants completed Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale translated into the Indonesian language. Multiple Regression showed that levels of perfectionism was significantly predicted by student’s level of intelligence and gender, but not academic performance.

Fitriani Yustikasari Lubis
University of Indonesia
Indonesia

Fitriani Y. Lubis is a lecturer in the Faculty of Psychology Universitas Padjadjaran in Indonesia. She is currently taking her PhD Program in Universitas Indonesia. In 2007, She joined advisory team for acceleration class for gifted students education program held in West Java. The team ended in 2014, however since then she has done and continued to do several researches related with gifted students. Her dissertation topic is about perfectionism in gifted students.

Lydia Freyani Hawadi*

Lydia Freyani Hawadi is a Professor in Faculty of Psychology University of Indonesia, specializing in giftedness. She actively teaches and guides students who are doing researches in giftedness. In 2000, she initiated acceleration class in Indonesia education program to answer its needs for gifted students curriculum in school. She also one of the founder of Asosiasi Psikologi Sekolah Indonesia (APSI, Association for School Psychologist in Indonesian) aimed to assist the needs of exceptional students, especially gifted students. She has published a number of the books about Giftedness in Indonesia.

Rose Mini Agoes Salim*

Rose Mini Agoes Salim is a lecturer at The Departement of Educational Psychology University of Indonesia and now served as the Head of Applied Psychology Magister Program in Faculty of Psychology University of Indonesia. She is also the founder and owner of Sekolah Taman Kreativitas Anak Indonesia (TKAI). Her research related with Multiple Intelligence and Creativity. She has published 7 series of Multiple Intelligence books and Multiple Intelligence Reference book for parents and teachers. She also has published a book about creativity.

Urip Purwono*

Urip Purwono is a lecturer at the Departement of Clinical Psychology University of Padjadjaran, Indonesia. Graduated from the University of Massachusetts, USA specializing in psychometrics and educational measurement/evaluation. Founder of the Center for Psychometric Study, UNPAD, his methodological research interest includes test theory, test construction, test adaptation, and structural equation modeling. In addition, he also does many works related to cognitive and educational test development to be used in Indonesia’s setting. He is currently the first Vice President of Indonesian Psychological Association (HIMPSI) and the President Elect of the Asean Regional Union of Psychological Society (ARUPS).


 

 

63 Gifted Education in Norway, from Teachers’ perspective
Poster, G&T

This research project is focused on how teachers in Norwegian primary and secondary schools view and accommodate gifted students. The following research questions are explored in this study: How do Norwegian teachers conceptualize and view giftedness? How are gifted students accommodated in Norwegian schools? How many teacher-identified gifted students are there in Norwegian schools? The study uses quantitative survey methods from a representative part of Norwegian elementary and secondary teachers. Gifted education is new in Norway and there is interest in what knowledge teachers have, teachers’ concept of giftedness, and how they view accommodation for gifted students.

Astrid Lenvik
University of Bergen
Norway

Astrid Lenvik has a master degree in Special Needs Education from the University of Oslo. She wrote her master thesis on gifted education and disruptive behavior, with guidance from professor Liv Duesund at University of Oslo, and professor Elliot Turiel at University of California, Berkeley. The field work for her thesis was conducted while she was staying as a visiting student at UCB. Lenvik has work experience from the national service for special needs education in Norway, the educational and psychological service provider for schools in Oslo, as well as schools and pre-schools.

Lise Øen Jones*

Lise Øen Jones is Associate Professor, Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen. Jones delivered her PhD-thesis “Effects of reading skills, spelling skills and accompanying efficacy beliefs on participation in education. A study of Norwegian prisons.” In 2012. She has since written several articles on reading and writing skills, education for prisoners, digital competence and digital learning. Jones is currently working on several research projects in relation to education in prisons, both Norwegian and international.

Elisabeth Hesjedal*

Elisabeth Hesjedal is Associate Professor, Department of Education, University of Bergen. Hesjedal has a particular interest in interprofessional collaboration and inclusive education for children at risk. She delivered her PhD-thesis” Interprofessional collaboration between schools and child welfare center: what can support children at risk”, in 2014. Hesjedal is currently working on research project related to children’s participation and special needs education.


 

 

116 Gifted education in the Australian context: The development of a discipline through the lens of empirical literature
Parallel Session, Misc

Gifted education is a discipline of research that exists in Australia, however, is relatively young in this country. A reflection of how the discipline of gifted education has developed in Australia allows for observations to be made about the past, and how this may influence future research and practice. The analysis of empirical research is one metric that can be used to undertake this observation, while also considering who is publishing, where the research is taking place, and what is being investigated. These metrics over time allow for commentary on the state of gifted education in Australia.

Jennifer Jolly
University of New South Wales
Australia

Jennifer L. Jolly, Ph.D., is a senior lecturer in gifted education at the University of New South Wales. Her research interests include the history of gifted education, motivation and gifted children, and parents of gifted children. Her work has been published in Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal for the Education for the Gifted, High Ability Studies, Roeper Review, and Gifted Child Today. She is the current Association Editor for the National Association for the Gifted Children (NAGC-USA).


 

 

302 Gifted education programming: one size does not fit all – a vision from the coalface
Parallel Session, G&T

Ideally, gifted programs should be visible, planned, and incorporate explicit assessment. They also require a specified philosophy, clear and appropriate goals, professional development for those actively involved, the necessity of being linked to curriculum, and have mechanisms for ongoing formative or summative assessment. Provisions, on the other hand, are usually short-term and fragmented, and in many cases not necessarily connected to the core curriculum. Provisions should not be considered as a valid comprehensive program. Our vision within a P-12 school is that both programmes and provisions have an important role to play in catering well for gifted students’ needs.

Nancy Wines
Lindisdarne Anglican Grammar School
Australia

Nancy Wines has over 16 years’ experience as a Drama and Literature Teacher, as well as having been a TESOL specialist in the UK, Dubai and Australia. Nancy has completed a PGCE, a Certificate of Gifted Education and she is currently finishing a Masters in Gifted Education. Dr Geraldine Townend has over a decade of experience in the field of gifted education, with expertise in the area of twice exceptionality. She is now a research fellow at the Griffith Institute of Educational Research. Her interests focus on supporting gifted and twice-exceptional students to aspire to their potential in education.

Geraldine Townend
Lindisfarne Anglican Grammar
Australia

Nancy Wines has over 16 years’ experience as a Drama and Literature Teacher, as well as having been a TESOL specialist in the UK, Dubai and Australia. Nancy has completed a PGCE, a Certificate of Gifted Education and she is currently finishing a Masters in Gifted Education. Dr Geraldine Townend has over a decade of experience in the field of gifted education, with expertise in the area of twice exceptionality. She is now a research fellow at the Griffith Institute of Educational Research. Her interests focus on supporting gifted and twice-exceptional students to aspire to their potential in education.


 

 

47 Gifted English Language Learners – Success Stories in Secondary Schools
Parallel Session, Diversity

Success stories of gifted ELLs in Australian secondary schools are recounted in this presentation that identifies the experiences and educational needs of this specific group of students and how these needs are being met. While there is consensus that students need proficiency in English to function in the Australian schooling system, my inquiry shows that the needs of students who are gifted must also be acknowledged. Success stories of diverse school offerings, support for English language learning, facilitation of self-directed learning, and quality of teachers and programs are identified as being paramount to meeting the educational needs of these students.

Aranzazu Blackburn
University of New England
Australia

Aranzazu M. Blackburn has been an educator for more than 20 years in Australia, undertaking diverse roles such as multi-age classroom teacher, English as a second language (ESL) teacher, Spanish teacher, assistant principal, PYP and curriculum coordinator, and learning support coordinator. Recently appointed as Director of Additional Learning Needs at Lindisfarne Anglican Grammar School in northern New South Wales, she has also recently successfully completed a PhD at the University of New England, Australia, focusing on gifted and talented English language learners in the secondary years.


 

 

87 Gifted girls speak out: A qualitative study exploring career development experiences of gifted adolescent girls
Parallel Session, Guidance

This presentation provides an overview of a qualitative, cross-sectional study containing three separate data sets (N=18 total participants) exploring the question of how adolescent gifted girls develop their career priorities over time. It examines participant perceptions of influential factors on their career-related values, goals, and decision making processes. Participants from three selective entry gifted education high school programs in South Australia participated. This presentation makes a significant contribution by proposing a career decision making model of gifted adolescent girls. It also establishes a platform for an anticipated longitudinal study. Unique Australian gifted educational contexts framing this study are also outlined.

Rebecca Napier
Flinders University
Australia

Rebecca is a PhD candidate and sessional staff member at Flinders University. Her PhD investigates the career development experiences of gifted adolescent girls. Her educational positions in Australia and Canada have ranged from special education to mainstream teaching to gifted education. Rebecca is currently a gifted education coordinator at two sister schools. Philosophy teaching is one of her current passions in this role. Volunteering with several not-for-profit gifted associations has enriched her experience in the field. Raising two of her own gifted adolescents currently provides her with many interesting adventures. Music and nature are two of her greatest loves.


 

 

156 Gifted Identification in rural and remote areas
Parallel Session, Identification

Australian gifted students in rural and remote areas are commonly under-identified. PISA results for these students are often low. The obstacles facing teachers attempting to identify gifted students in this situation in many countries are significant. Which factors impede rural and remote school systems? How has increased use of IT impacted this problem? How can teachers positively and sustainably improve accurate identification and the education experiences for these children? How can teachers improve whole school awareness of the issue? How can parents assist to better identify and serve these children?

Christine Ireland
AAEGT
Australia

Christine Ireland is president of the Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented, has published a chapter in Let The Tall Poppies Flourish and Giftedness Illuminated by Creativity. Christine has been a Secondary teacher for twenty years, and has been the gifted education coordinator in several secondary and primary schools. Christine has lectured at Melbourne University (Gifted Education units of the Master of Education), and at the Australian Catholic University. She has completed her Master of Education, a post graduate Certificate of Gifted Education, two Harvard Certificates of Education, and is currently completing her Doctorate of Education.


 

 

140 Gifted Students’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of Leaders and Leadership
Parallel Session, Leadership

The purpose of this study was to examine gifted students’ and teachers’ perceptions of leaders and leadership. The conception of leadership, characteristics of leaders, and gifted students’ leadership were identified based on a comprehensive review of literature and two focus group interviews. Focus group data were analyzed using qualitative methods. Gifted students and teachers in South Korea agreed upon the qualities of great leaders and leadership programs. However, they held different opinions on gifted students’ leadership. Discussion on the reasons for this gap and further analysis will be included in the presentation.

Seon-Young Lee
Seoul National University
South Korea

Seon-Young Lee, Ph.D., is an associate professor of the Department of Education at Seoul National University in Seoul, South Korea. Previously, she was a faculty member of the education department at Yonsei University and a research assistant professor at Northwestern University’s Center for Talent Development. Seon-Young has published 80+ research articles, books, and book chapters in the field of gifted and creative education. Her research interests encompass gifted students’ talent development, specialized gifted programs, creativity, peer relationships, and leadership development of gifted and creative students. She received the Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year Award for 2011.

Eunjoo Boo
Seoul National University
South Korea

Eunjoo Boo is a Ph.D. student. Eunjoo studies educational psychology at the Department of Education at Seoul National University.

Yun-kyoung Kim
Seoul National University
South Korea

Yun-kyoung Kim is a Ph.D. student. Yun-kyoung studies educational psychology at the Department of Education at Seoul National University.

Eunsun Kim*

Eunsun Kim is a Ph.D. student. Eunsun studies educational psychology at the Department of Education at Seoul National University.

Taehee Kim*

Taehee Kim is a Masters’ student. Taehee studies educational psychology at the Department of Education at Seoul National University.

Hyunuk Park*

Hyunuk Park is a Masters’ student. Hyunuk studies educational psychology at the Department of Education at Seoul National University.


 

 

256 Global Interdependence is a Reality!
Parallel Session, Creativity

The creative problem solving process is an excellent means of nonviolent conflict resolution. Creative problem solving can be adapted to the needs of the 21st century student as well as to any individual seeking to become a global, ethical leader. During this session, participants will experience the problem solving process by exploring a future scene of global interest set in 2035. Training in this process enables the learner to address problem situations in their own lives as well as assist students as they strive to become ethical leaders around the world.

April Dennis
Future Problem Solving Program International
United States

April Dennis has served as the Program Director of Future Problem Solving Program International (FPSPI) since 2012. With a background in advanced curriculum strategies and highly engaging learning techniques, April enjoys being part of a student-driven organization designed to promote students as leaders.

A graduate of the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor’s in Elementary Education and the University of South Florida with a Masters in Gifted Education, April’s passion is providing challenging curriculum for 21st century students so they are equipped with problem solving and ethical leadership skills for the future.


 

 

272 Global Partnerships to Develop Creative Problem Solving
Symposium, G&T

Members of the panel include university-based researchers, public school teachers, and administrators from four countries who have cooperated to implement an evidence-based teaching/learning model to develop Real Engagement in Active Problem Solving through facilitating students’ solving of real-life problems. The model was developed to serve gifted students, and has been used successfully with students in varied settings. Local community members, teachers, students, researchers, and administrators have cooperated in choosing local, national, and international problems connected to required curriculum standards for their schools. We will share the ways we have implemented, tested, and modified the model in both research and practice.

C. June Maker
University of Arizona
United States

C. June Maker, PhD, professor in the department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies, University of Arizona, prepares professors in special education and education of the gifted. She is an associate editor for Gifted and Talented International and the International Journal of Research in Education, and an Editorial Board member for other international journals. In 2015, she received the International Research Award from WCGTC and Doctor of Letters Degree from Western Kentucky University. Her research is on performance-based assessments and creativity development. She is a frequent keynote speaker. The website for her project, DISCOVER, is www.discover.arizona.edu, and her email is junemaker@hotmail.com.

Myra Wearne
North Sydney Demonstration School
Australia

Myra Wearne is principal of North Sydney Demonstration School, a public school in New South Wales with a long-standing partnership with the Education Faculty of Sydney University. She is considered by colleagues and supervisors as an exemplary leader in providing differentiated curricula and educational programs for all students; she facilitates professional dialogue and cooperative programs between her faculty and faculty members of the university to create an environment that is safe, happy, and academically challenging. Administrators, teachers, and support personnel are committed to developing teaching practices and school structures in line with the best of current educational research.

Tracy Riley
Massey University
New Zealand

Associate Professor Tracy Riley works in the Institute of Education, and teaches gifted education at post graduate level, and supervises Masters and PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a lifetime member of giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education, in recognition for her service as the founding Chairperson and a New Zealand Delegate to the World Council.

Faisal Alamiri
The University of Jeddah
Saudi Arabia

Dr. Faisal Alamiri has an extended specialty in gifted education including Bachelors, Masters, and Ph.D.; assistant professor in giftedness and creativity; and Chair of the Special Education Department in the Faculty of Education, The University of Jeddah. He is a member of the strategic committee for developing policies, initiatives, and academic programs at the University of Jeddah. He is a member of the executive committee of The Asia-Pacific Federation on Giftedness (APFG). He teaches gifted education and creativity courses at the postgraduate level. His research interests are in gifted education policies, curriculum and pedagogy, and creativity.

Melinda Webber
University of Auckland
New Zealand

Dr Melinda Webber has been lecturing and researching at The University of Auckland since 2001. Melinda is currently Associate Dean PBRF. Melinda worked fulltime as a qualitative researcher on the Starpath Project from 2011-2014. She was also a co-principal investigator on Nga Pae o te Maramatanga funded research project called ‘Ka Awatea: A case study of Maori student success’ in her home town of Rotorua.

Katrina Sylva
Dargaville High School
New Zealand

Katrina Sylva is the Gifted and Talented Education Coordinator at Dargaville High School, a low decile rural school in Northland, New Zealand. She is the lead teacher of the REAPS Teacher Led Innovation Fund (TLIF) research project.


 

 

279 Global Perspectives on the Tall Poppy Syndrome
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Dating to ancient Rome and persisting through the centuries, the “Tall Poppy Syndrome” occurs when persons of elevated rank encounter aggression from peers with resentful attitudes toward their high status. In a “zero-sum game,” the rising of one person must achieve a balance by causing another to fall. Similarly, gifted children may experience an “underdog” status when less capable peers resent or envy their giftedness and talents. This session addresses affective needs, survival strategies, and proactive advocacy related to the Tall Poppy Syndrome through global perspectives gained by grown up gifted children, their parents, and seasoned educators of the gifted.

Connie Phelps
Emporia State University
United States

Connie Phelps is Professor and Director of Gifted Education at Emporia State University where she trains gifted facilitators in grades K-12 to meet state and national standards. She directs the Great Plains Center for Gifted Studies and co-edits the Emporia State Research Studies. She serves as Past Chair of the Professional Development Network in NAGC and was an alternate delegate to WCGTC. She leads state and national accreditation reviews; presents at state, national and international conferences; serves on the Future Problem Solving Program International Board of Advisors and coordinates the Inventions component of the International Torrance Creativity Legacy Award.

Bailey Carter
Emporia State University
United States

Bailey Carter plans to pursue graduate studies in Drama Therapy after graduating from Emporia State University with a BA in Theater and minor in psychology. She wrote a script based on a William Allen White Book Award selection, co-stared in a university theater production of 39 Steps and actively participated in the university theater Costume Shop and Zoiks Improv Comedy Troupe. A grown up gifted child, Bailey served as President of the Gifted Club at Topeka West High School and enjoys delving deeply into the many topics that interest her.

Abby Phelps
Emporia State University
United States

Abby Phelps is a graduate student in Library Information and Management at Emporia State University, and she works as a library clerk at Riverside Elementary School in Emporia, Kansas. She received her BA in Theatre Arts and English Literature from Hastings College. A grown up gifted child, she received gifted services from third through twelfth grades. She worked as an au pair in Paris, France, and she enjoys reading classics, discussing films and traveling internationally.


 

 

26 Global Use of Gifted Students’ Drawn Images to Personalize Educational Differentiation
Parallel Session, Identification

We invite gifted students into the process of their own education by asking them to draw actual and ideal school images. Research across cultures has shown that there is a universal language of school preferences. However, when students select an image to depict from all the possible images, it is because it is important to them and thus to us as their teachers. This session will present case studies of how this information has been used to plan individually appropriate talent development experiences for high achieving and culturally diverse students across all grade levels and in all content areas.

Dorothy Armstrong
Grand Valley State University
United States

Dorothy Ciner Armstrong is a professor in the Leadership and Learning Department at Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids MI. She teaches courses in and coordinated master’s programs for talent development for many years. Her research has focused on bringing the voice of gifted students into the process of their own education. She developed the ADAPT system that uses the learning characteristics of gifted students to guide effective and appropriate differentiation. Within ADAPT, teachers use Classroom Cues and Classroom Visions. While teachers and parents make educational decisions, these techniques allow students to be actively involved in their own education. http://classroomvisions.com


 

 

43 GT Carpe Diem: Empowering Self-Advocacy
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Many gifted students wait patiently (or often, impatiently) for their needs to be met while the adults in charge of their education struggle with an unending parade of initiatives, funding issues, and changes in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. But our brightest teens can take the lead in crafting their own unique paths through secondary school when we provide the necessary insights and tools. Through self-advocacy they will find more of what they want and need: meaningful schoolwork, exploration of interests, time with peers, and personalized accommodations. This session presents essential guidelines for empowering gifted students’ self-advocacy.

Deborah Douglas
GT Carpe Diem
United States

Deb Douglas advocates for gifted children in the United States and beyond, empowering our brightest young people to assess their needs, speak up for themselves, take positive risks, and effectively self-advocate. She was a board member of the Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted (WATG) for nine years and President from 2011-13. A former high school teacher and director of gifted education for over 20 years, she now consults throughout the United States, delivering GT Carpe Diem workshops for gifted youth as well as professional development for educators and support for parents.


 

 

245 Holistic assessment and technology: Reaping the benefits
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

The holistic development, judgment and assessment partnership is vital in terms of its influence on the socioemotional and educational welfare of gifted individuals – personally and institutionally. Understanding and knowledge grows. Better quality environments are provided. Specific needs are more mindfully accommodated. Acquiring and managing necessarily rich data can be stressful. However, a variety of technological tools are available which save time while adding value and credibility to assessments. They can simplify data collection, management and exploration; facilitate critical thinking, problem finding and solving; clarify issues; enhance interventions: monitor response to interventions; and improve the efficacy and outcome of communication.

Trevor Tebbs
Castleton University & Chandelier Assessments
United States

Trevor is a veteran educator of 47 years. After settling in Vermont, he attended the University of Connecticut where studies with Renzulli resulted in an advanced degree in Educational Psychology. After building a private practice and working with gifted young people, their parents, teachers, school psychologists and counselors, he has primarily focused on holistic assessment. Life has led Trevor in many interesting psychoeducationally related directions, including being assistant editor of GTI, teaching in the USA, Canada, England, Poland, Switzerland and Ukraine. Presently he is Associate Editor of the International Journal for Talent Development and Creativity (ITJTDC).


 

 

300 Homeschooling your gifted child
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

According to a recent report by the U.S. Department of Education, approximately 1.77 million students are homeschooled. For profoundly gifted (PG) students, homeschooling may provide an excellent alternative to traditional schooling. Homeschooling a PG child can be highly challenging, but ultimately beneficial. Hear from a parent who homeschooled her child from Kindergarten through high school, and from her 17-year old daughter, now a Ph.D. student in Educational Psychology. In this interactive session, presenters will share their perspectives and advice about the pros and cons of homeschooling, dispel myths, and provide a list of resources for participants.

Noel Jett
University of North Texas
United States

Noel Jett is the youngest Ph.D. student at UNT. She teaches an online class for gifted learners. Her research focuses on the social and emotional needs of the profoundly gifted.

Nancy Shastid
Ms.
United States

Having homeschooled her profoundly gifted daughter until she began college at 13, Nancy was a reluctant homeschooler. She learned of the Davidson Institute for Talent Development Young Scholar program when Noel was 8. She then joined the Texas Parents of the Profoundly Gifted, where she now serves on the board.


 

 

244 How far can multiculturalism advance the learning of social studies for the gifted in Singapore?
Poster, Misc

A disturbing study found that many students in Singapore had uncritically adopted the state’s values and ideals about citizenship (Ho, 2010). This finding is troubling and ironic because the curriculum explicitly states that the goal of social studies is to promote independent inquiry and critical thinking. Moreover, the highest level of service-learning is an effective curriculum for gifted students that exposes them to community problems and encourages them to solve those problems creatively (Terry, Bohnenberger, Renzulli, Cramond, & Sisk, 2008). This paper seeks to explore how a multicultural approach towards learning social studies among gifted students can achieve such goals.

See Ping Loh
Singapore Sports School
Singapore

I am a teacher and forever a student. Subjects I’m passionate about are Modern World History, History of Singapore and Social Studies.


 

 

345 How to teach physics and chemistry to gifted children?
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

This presentation will explore teaching Chemistry and Physics to gifted students of lower level in grammar school. The activities suitable and not suitable for teaching Physics and Chemistry to gifted children will be described. The presentation will be focused on approaches which I have found ineffective and subsequently on those which I have found useful. The differences in terms of gaining knowledge between gifted and non-gifted students will be outlined at the end of the presentation as well as the various examination methods usable in gifted students teaching.

Martin Konecny
Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
Czech Republic

Martin Konecny works as a teacher at Mensa grammar school, a school for gifted students in Prague, where he teaches Maths, Physics, Chemistry. He studied Physics with focus on chemical physics, biophysics and subsequently teaching of Chemistry, Physics for Secondary Schools. As a part of his doctoral studies at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, he focuses on teaching physics to gifted students, especially on the use of experiment in Physics. He performs regularly at conferences with presentations about practical teaching, conducts seminars about gifted students, leads future teachers on teaching practices with gifted students.


 

 

325 Human Raising With Relationships In Mind – The Scientific Way
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Most of us want happy, healthy, fulfilling connections. The social dynamic is hugely influential in its ability to impact all areas of life, at all ages. However we weren’t brought up knowing what was required to ‘do relationship.’ Yet, successful relationships have essentially been reverse-engineered. There’s a formula which provides more than 90% accuracy. Utilising more than four decades of multi-dimensional and extensive research you’ll learn: 1) The 7 steps to building a sound relationship 2) To easily differentiate between Masters and Disasters of relationships 3) How to model the traits required to lead by example for the next generation

Katerina Morjanoff

Australia

Katerina Morjanoff was a high school drop-out, teen parent, runaway, and tends to do things in a slightly ‘professionally incorrect’ way. She was also one of the youngest Montessori Association Presidents ever, has featured in books and the media on a variety of topics including her work in the tech startup ecosystem. She represented Australia in ice-skating at age 15 and brings many of the intense lessons learned as an athlete into the educational arena. Her insights into Human Raising have been constantly requested, and she is now willing to appear on stage to share them.


 

 

92 Identification of underachievement in ability grouped settings
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This presentation explores the findings of research investigating potential of using the School Attitude Assessment Survey- Revised (SAAS-R), the Self-Efficacy Scale for children, and the Social Coping Questionnaire as a tool to identify students at risk of underachievement. The study investigated the veracity of this approach using logistic regression analyses techniques and ROC curve analysis. Results indicated that the variables motivation/ self-regulation and social self-efficacy and gender and school type were predictor variables that could identify students at risk of underachievement.

Ruth Phillips
University of Wollongong
Australia

Ruth is an educator with qualifications Education, Psychology and is at the penultimate stage of her doctorate at the University of Wollongong with a focus on gifted underachievement. Ruth is a practicing teacher and has taught gifted students from pre-school to year 12. She is also a consultant who has worked with teachers and parents. She has also presented papers at International and Australian Education Conferences including the AAEGT conference in 2016 and the Wallace Research Symposium on Talent Development and was a co-author on the DEST Gifted Education Professional Development Package, Module 2: Identification of Gifted and Talented Students.


 

 

109 Identifying gifted students in multiple areas and targeting strategies to turn potential into performance
Parallel Session, Identification

This parallel session will look at identifying the learning and social and emotional needs of potential gifted students in six areas (intellectual abilities, creative abilities, personal/social qualities, athletic ability, visual and performing arts, and technological abilities). It will address how to meet their needs using a range of strategies and using Google Apps for Education to track identification, provision, and performance. The resources have been based on Françoys Gagné’s Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent (2012) and look at how to identify potential and target provision to enhance performance.

Brooke Trenwith
Cognition Education Ltd
New Zealand

Brooke joined the Cognition team as part of the GaTE PLD, a Ministry of Education contract designed to support schools build their capability and develop effective, robust and transparent GaTE programmes. In 2016, she was project leader of this contract and a national representative for the NZAGC. A holistic educator, Brooke works with teachers, leaders and families to create programmes that meet the learning, social and emotional needs of students, whilst creating a “rising tide” of achievement to support diverse learners and the minoritised. Her approachable and flexible style encourages engagement in change management and supports honest reflection within PLD.


 

 

77 Identifying the Gifted Learner in a Rural Context
Parallel Session, Advocacy

This presentation will examine the cognitive and affective benefits for parents and educators of the gifted, which was achieved by an inspiring professional learning joint venture, funded by the Victorian Government and delivered by the VAGTC. Rural living challenges examined include peer support, professional learning, and uncertainty about a child’s developmental behaviors. Participants will discuss the cognitive and affective benefits expressed by the seminar participants, via pre and post test results, as a direct outcome of the Gifted and Talented Identification seminars in rural towns in Victoria.

Carmel Meehan
Victorian Association for Gifted and Talented Children Inc.
Australia

Carmel is an Independent Educational Consultant and a former primary school principal with 20 years of leadership experience. Carmel’s interests are in curriculum development that allows gifted and talented students to reach their potential.She joined the VAGTC after completing a Post Graduate Certificate in Gifted Education, she also has a Master of Education, a Graduate Diploma in Religious Education and Counseling and Infant Teacher training.Carmel has been the President of the VAGTC for the past 6 years ,she has presented workshops and seminars at conferences Nationally and Internationally and is a published author.


 

 

278 Identifying the Gifted When Valid & Reliable Measures Don’t Exist and a Shortage of Resources
Parallel Session, Identification

Most of the literature regarding the identification of the gifted and talented is highly centered around using instruments that currently exist. However, most of these instruments have not been examined to determine validity and reliability in most other countries outside of where they were developed. The goal of our parallel session is for the audience to feel that they have left with a variety of strategies about how to use existing resources or efficiently develop new resources to use in their country when there are no valid or reliable measures to identify the gifted.

Leticia Jaquez
Instituto de Talentos y Prodigios (Institute of Talents and Prodigies), INTALPRO, Inc. & Universidad Catolica Nordestana (UCNE)
United States

Leticia Jáquez is one of the founders of the Dominican non-profit organization for the gifted and talented, Instituto de Talentos y Prodigios(INTALPRO), Inc. She is the project director for the grade 5-12 school for the gifted and talented under development in the Dom. Rep, Academia Oportunidad. In 2014, Jaquez participated in the Dominican national committee for educational reform. She recently published a chapter in Gifted Children of Color Around the World. Jaquez’s experience in administration, her dedication to social responsibility, and her identification as a gifted individual has made her an ideal advocate for gifted education in the Dominican Republic.

Roman Jaquez
Instituto de Talentos y Prodigios & Universidad Catolica Nordestana (UCNE)
United States

Roman Jáquez is a PhD candidate in Education at the Fundación Universitaria Iberoamericana (FUNIBER). He graduated as an electro-mechanical engineer from PUCMM in Santiago, Dominican Republic. He also holds a master’s in management from Lesley University. Roman is also one of nine founders of the Lowell Community Charter Public School (LCCPS). He was the chairman of the board of directors for five consecutive years. He is a board member of LCCPS foundation arm, Friends of LCCPS, Inc. Roman believes that randomness should be replaced by a more deterministic educational approach in bringing the Dominican society’s best and brightest to fulfillment.


 

 

307 Impact of the difference in e-feedback patterns within a simulation-based software to teach programming for gifted students
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

This research aimed to measure the impact of the difference in e-feedback patterns within a simulation-based software to teach programming for gifted students. The researcher followed the semi-experimental method and developed the experimental design based on two groups. The tools of the research were the achievement test and performance test, with a related note card. The research concluded the existence of statistical variables of (0.05) between the mean scores of the two groups. The research suggests the importance of the employment of feedback in simulation-based educational software to introduce different levels of aid and guiding for these educational materials.

Seham Alnafea
Ministry of Education
Saudi Arabia

Master Degree in Educational Technology Bachelor Degree in Math

with a 20 years experience in education, 11 of them as high school math teacher and 9 of them as gifted students educator.

also worked as an FLL couch for 4 years and lead her team to win over 10 local awards and 3 international awards.

now working in the Gifted Girls Department in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia as the supervisor of the Gifted School, and the Gifted Girls Center.


 

 

290 Impactful Service: Authentic Professorship in the Gifted Education Community
Poster, Programming

“Impactful Service: Authentic Professorship,” illustrates how college professors serve the gifted community and impact the academic goals of students in Kindergarten through high school. How can college professors with experience and academic preparation in education utilize academic skills and expertise to impact the daily lives of the gifted community in a positive way? This presentation will describe the activities of “Authentic Professorship” that addresses the needs of the gifted community beyond the university, thereby creating “Impactful Service” while maintaining the professorial roles of Teaching, Research, and Service as defined by the university.

Joyce MIller
Texas A&M University-Commerce
United States

Dr. Joyce E. Kyle Miller is a professor at Texas A&M University-Commerce in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Miller developed the graduate Gifted Education program and teaches the online courses. In addition, Dr. Miller is a Board Member and Board Secretary for the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented. College Tours,Career Forums,ACT and SAT Practice Tests are some of the services Dr. Miller organizes for gifted students in Garland, Texas and surrounding communities. Research emphases include gifted curriculum and instruction, cultural diversity, technology, and online instruction.


 

 

367 Improve Students’ Mathematics-Learning Ability
Parallel Session, Programming

A basic course to enhance students’ quality, it will serve as a foundation for further study and research in this discipline. To better teach these young students with a strong thirst for knowledge, we have also arranged varied activities to enrich the class so that research ability can be stressed in the classroom. It is an improvement of class learning to develop their self-study ability and creativity and arouse their desire to learn after class so that they could take the initiative to learn themselves. This presentation aims to talk about how to improve students’ mathematics-learning ability through classroom examples.

Ying Huang
Beijing No. 8 High School
China

My name is Ying Huang, who graduated from the Mathematics Department of Beijing Normal University in 2004 with a master’s degree. I have been working in Beijing No.8 High School since graduation. I have been engaged in teaching for 13 years, during which I served as the head teacher for 10 years. I have been teaching Gifted Children in gifted program of our school for 6 years.


 

 

201 In practice, not just in theory: A developmental approach to supporting social and emotional growth in gifted students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

The New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education’s curriculum for gifted learners includes a specific content strand entitled “Personal Development” aimed at supporting gifted students to gain an understanding of what it means to be gifted, building better intra and interpersonal knowledge. Students develop a greater awareness of who they are and what makes them tick and become empowered to take better control of their social and emotional needs. We see amazing social and emotional outcomes for the students we work with and are happy to share our practice with this international community.

Anna Meuli
New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education
New Zealand

Anna has worked in the field of gifted education for the past 20 years holding roles such as Gifted Education Adviser, Lecturer and GATE Lead Teacher. Currently Anna works for the New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education as the Consultancy Manager. This role includes supporting communities to establish and maintain their own localised Centres for Gifted Education, curriculum development, programme development and teacher professional learning and development. Anna’s main focus and contributions in the field of Gifted Education are on curriculum development for gifted students, effecting school and teacher change, and translating theory into practice.


 

 

166 Insights into practice and research of William-Stern-Association for gifted research and gifted education
Symposium, G&T

This symposium is intended to provide insights into the work of the William-Stern-Association for gifted research and gifted education (WSG). The WSG is a non-profit organization that researches psychological and educational problems concerning gifted children and adolescents. Research about diagnostics and counselling as well as the relation of intelligence, need for cognition, and school grades will be presented and discussed. The aim of this symposium is to establish new contacts as well as exchange views with other organizations and programs that are concerned with gifted research and fostering to enable a sustainable exchange.

Nina Krüger
Universität Hamburg
Germany

2006 Member of the William-Stern-Gesellschaft für Begabungsforschung und Begabtenförderung e.V. 2007 Diplom in Psychology (equivalent: Master of Science) 2008-2014 Research Fellow at the Developmental Psychology, University of Hamburg 2014 Dr. phil. (equivalent: PhD) in Psychology Since 2014 Research Fellow and Lecturer at the University of Hamburg, Institute of Psychology 2016 Starting advanced training in psychotherapy

Sören Fiedler
William-Stern-Gesellschaft für Begabungsforschung und Begabtenförderung e.V.
Germany

2007 Diplom in Psychology (equivalent: Master of Science) 2009 Member of the William-Stern-Gesellschaft für Begabungsforschung und Begabtenförderung e.V. Since 2016 Research Fellow and Lecturer at the Helmut-Schmidt-University, Hamburg 2013 Starting advanced training in psychotherapy

Mara Suhren-Geipel
William-Stern-Gesellschaft für Begabungsforschung und Begabtenförderung e.V.
Germany

wardrobe mistress, Member of the William-Stern-Gesellschaft für Begabungsforschung und Begabtenförderung e.V., 2011 Diplom in Psychology (equivalent: Master of Science)

Mieke Johannsen
Universität Hamburg
Germany

B.Sc. student of Psychology, University of Hamburg, research assistant

Marguerite Peritz
Universität Hamburg
Germany

bank clerk, B.Sc. Psychology, M.Sc. student of Psychology, University of Hamburg, research assistant

Mara Ohligschläger
Universität Hamburg
Germany

B.Sc. Psychology, M.Sc. student of Psychology, University of Hamburg, research assistant


 

 

99 Integrating technology and simulations that transform the gifted curriculum for culturally and internationally relevant learning
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

Explore the impact and use of new technologies in gifted education, using six core principles: Power (empowerment); Person (customizable); Place (virtual, simulated, augmented); Processes (problem-solving); Productivity (innovations); Projections (global networking, robotics). Examine how teachers can generate a culturally and internationally relevant curriculum (CIRC), especially for immigrant and second language learners. Practice how to incorporate new technologies into the creative process that are authentic and appropriately differentiated and strategies for using emerging social media productively. See the demonstration of a simulated classroom where case studies of real immigrant gifted learners from low-income contexts are scripted into avatars for live interactions.

Gillian Eriksson
University of Central Florida
United States

Gillian Eriksson, Ph.D. is a Lecturer/Coordinator of Gifted Education, at the University of Central Florida. She was a South African then USA delegate to the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, has presented at 14 World Gifted conferences. She is a consultant editor and widely published in gifted education. She is the PI for Project ELEVATE (Jacob K. Javits Grant). She coordinates study programs to The Netherlands, England, and South Africa. She has received awards for UCF Women of Excellence for Global Achievement (2016); Teaching Excellence; Golden Psi Award of Excellence (APA); Internationalization; Minority Mentorship and a Fulbright scholarship.


 

 

177 Interactions between high school teachers and a gifted student in a mixed-ability classroom: Teachers’ response styles
Parallel Session, G&T

Gifted students (GS) spend most of their time in mixed-ability classroom settings. Interactions between teachers and students are core occurrences that trigger class events. The teachers’ way of conducting and responding during interactions with students may affect the learning opportunities provided for GS. In a research project focused on teacher narrative of their interactions with GS, the analysis led to characterize five teacher response styles (e.g., The Blocker, The initiator). Each style has its own characteristics (e.g., control participation, create learning opportunities) and has a different effect on the learning opportunities available for GS. This research has important practical implications.

Naama Benny
The Givat Wasington Academic College of Education
Israel

Naama Benny is a teacher researcher at the Givat Wasington Academic College of Education in Israel. She received her Ph.D. in science teaching at The Weizmann Institute of Science. She received her B.Sc. and her M.Sc. in chemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. For more than ten years she has been a teacher and the school principal of a special school for gifted students. During this period, she became acquainted with research and practice in the field of gifted students’ education. Her research focuses on the interactions of science teachers with gifted students in a regular classroom.

Ron Blonder*

Prof. Ron Blonder is a senior researcher in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. She received her B.Sc. (summa cum laude, 1993) and her Ph.D. in chemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is engaged in the professional development of chemistry teachers and in research in Science Education focusing on chemistry and nanotechnology education. Her goal is to promote the modernization of both chemistry contents and chemistry teaching pedagogies by promoting professional development and interactions within the community of chemistry teachers. Her research focuses on chemistry teachers’ knowledge and attitudes.


 

 

51 Investigating active learning in a Biology classroom through an inquiry approach for high ability learners
Poster, G&T

This presentation discusses the use of inquiry-based learning (IBL) as a learner-centered approach to cultivate active thinking and learning in a scientific classroom for high-ability learners. Improvements in students’ interests, scientific synthesis, and processing skills, have been reported in undergraduate students in the areas of science and engineering. However, learning gains in these areas following the implementation of IBL remain poorly understood in learners younger than 18. In this study, IBL is implemented in biology classrooms comprised of gifted female learners aged 15-16 years old. Students’ learning outcomes including knowledge and skills are measured quantitatively using diagnostics tests.

Ai Khim Lim
Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary)
Singapore

I completed my PhD in Biological Sciences (NUS) in 2010, where I worked on the ovary development in fruitflies with Dr Toshie Kai in Temasek Lifesciences Laboratory. I went to join Professor Barbara Knowles and Professor Davor Solter in Institute of Medical Biology from 2010-2013, where I worked on the ovary development in mice. I joined RGS in 2014.

Tien Lee*

Nil


 

 

309 Investigation Of Internet Addiction In Gifted Students According To The Different Variables
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

In this study, it is aimed to view internet addiction of gifted children and the relationship between different (demographic, social-cultural, and economic and ownership of digital products and connecting) variables. The sample of the study consisted of 423 gifted children from different science and art centers. The research data was collected using Günüç’s “Internet Addiction Scale.” At the end of the study different results were obtain about the variables (gender, age, educational status of parents, having natural/step father and mother, type of school, socio-economic status of family, effects of digital products, status of internet connection at home) of the research.

Ahmet Kurnaz
Necmettin Erbakan University
Turkey

He was born in 1973. He worked as primary school teacher for 6 years. He worked as primary school manager for 9 years. He obtains master degree in 2002 and Ph. degree in 2007 associated whit curriculum development area. In 2007, he started to work at Science/Art center for gifted. He started to work as University Member at department of special education in 2010. He has a lot of works, projects, presentations and articles about gifted children, gifted education and teaching thinking skills in gifted and using technology of gifted. He still works as a lecturer at special education department.

Aynur Usta*

She graduate from special education department in 2009. She worked as seven years as special education teacher. She obtain master degree on special education on 2015. She still works as special education teacher.


 

 

100 Is femininity the new ‘f’ word?: An exploration of gender identity and talent development of high achieving females
Parallel Session, G&T

Is femininity the ‘f’ word when it comes to developing the talent of our highly able girls? What role do perceptions of masculinity and femininity have in influencing girls of high potential as they make decisions about career paths and study options? What are the factors that influence one girl to pursue a career in engineering, whilst another of the same high ability ventures into teaching? Emerging themes of identity, mindsets, values, and self-regulation will be explored.

Kate Lafferty
Monash University
Australia

Kate is currently teaching three days in the Compass Centre, an enrichment program for highly able students, at Methodist Ladies College in Melbourne’s east. With almost twenty years of teaching experience, the last seven have been dedicated to establishing and implementing a respected and valued gifted and talented withdrawal program in a Victorian government primary school. Kate is completing her PhD at Monash University, focusing on the talent development of gifted girls, and is passionate about Gifted Education. Kate has presented sessions on Gifted Education to teachers and parents, as well as providing mentoring to both schools and students.


 

 

314 Is it a problem if Australian schools don’t foster mathematical promise? Parent perspectives and implications
Parallel Session, G&T

Concerns have been raised, over the past few years, with the performance of Australian students on international testing such as PISA and TIMSS. In particular, a decreasing proportion of students is reaching the highest levels of performance in numeracy and mathematics. Findings from a recent Australia-wide online survey of parents about fostering the mathematical promise of their children with high potential in mathematics will be discussed to shed light on school programs and impacts. The results have implications for talent development goals and responsibilities at the parent-child levels and for the wider community.

Simone Zmood
Monash University
Australia

Simone Zmood is a PhD Candidate at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. Simone has taught pre-service secondary teachers and is a research assistant at the university, as well as a part-time mathematics mentor for high ability primary and secondary students at a K-12 school. She has been involved with the Encouraging Persistence, Maintaining the Challenge project, and coordinates the Mathematics Education Research Colloquium series in the Faculty of Education. Simone gained two decades of experience in the business world, specialising in corporate strategy and performance management, before returning to the field of education.


 

 

194 Leadership Development in Gifted Adolescents
Parallel Session, Leadership

This presentation will examine the development of leadership potential in gifted adolescents with examples and illustrations from the speaker’s experience of a year teaching in a small boarding school in a remote hill village. In the context of established models of talent development, the presentation will draw on the literature to identify the characteristics of gifted leaders and the processes, influences, and opportunities that influence the development of leadership potential in gifted adolescents.

Lynne Maher
Tasmanian Association for the Gifted Inc
Australia

Lynne has been actively involved with the Tasmanian Association for the Gifted for many years, including six years as president. She is Tasmanian Director and treasurer for the National Association, AAEGT. Lynne is a qualified and experienced teacher with experience teaching, training and facilitating learning with all ages. Her knowledge of gifted education expanded as she advocated for her gifted son. Lynne has conducted local information sessions for educators and parents, professional development for teachers, and presentations at both state and national conferences. Lynne spent 2015 as a voluntary teacher in a village in the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan.


 

 

53 Leading and Teaching for Adolescent Talent Development: One High School’s SEAL Experience from an Insider and Outsider’s Perspective
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

Box Hill High school has the largest Select Entry Accelerated Learning (SEAL) Program in a Victorian state government school. The principal initiated a teaching/research project partnership with Monash University for three consecutive years to provide a Professional Learning unit with assessment for teachers at the school to be exposed to the evidence-based research literature in gifted education and talent development taught at an equivalent Master’s level. The aim of this project was to investigate these experienced teachers’ beliefs and understandings about teaching and nurturing adolescents’ talents. Findings from this research will be shared alongside the principal’s perspective.

Kate Mitchell
Box Hill High School
Australia

Kate Mitchell, [M.Ed(gifted ed), B.Comm., Dip. Ed] has been an educator, Victorian State Government schools for 20+ years, taking on many school leadership roles – curriculum development, student welfare, coordination of the largest Select Entry Acceleration Learning (SEAL) program in a high school. In 2007 she became first female Principal, Box Hill High School. In 2011, she was seconded to position of Acting Regional Network leader to support 30 Primary and Secondary School Principals. In 2013, she was invited to join Victorian Department of Education’s Gifted and Talented Expert Reference Group. She is a strong advocate gifted and talented students.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

74 Leading Differentiated Learning for the Gifted
Parallel Session, Programming

The purpose of the study was to investigate teachers’ attitudes and perceptions of giftedness, and their self-reported teaching practices; compare the perceptions of principals and teachers about differentiated pedagogical practices; and examine the principals’ perceptions about school-wide differentiation. Participants included 867 teachers and 120 principals from government schools in Sydney, Australia. A mixed-method approach was used, including online questionnaires and case studies of principals. Results revealed significant differences between the perceptions of principals and teachers about educating gifted learners; and a need for stronger pedagogical congruence between principals and teachers in educating the gifted, and leadership actions for school-wide differentiation.

Manoj Chandra Handa
Oceans of Excellence
Australia

Dr. Manoj Chandra Handa currently serves as Principal Education Officer at the NSW Department of Education, Sydney. In 2012, Manoj was recognised as one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People” in Sydney by “the (Sydney) magazine” published by The Sydney Morning Herald. He completed his PhD thesis, “Leading Differentiated Learning for the Gifted”, in 2016 at Macquarie University, Sydney. He was recognised for “Excellence in Higher Degree Research” by the Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University. Manoj was recently selected for “The Smart Teacher Research Award 2016” by The Teachers’ Guild of New South Wales for his doctoral research.


 

 

46 Learning through Geographical Field Inquiry for High-Ability Learners
Parallel Session, Programming

Research supports the use of inquiry as an instructional approach for students of high ability (VanTassel-Baska, J., 2003). The infusion of fieldwork into the Geographical Inquiry approach helps High Ability Learners to understand advance and complex concepts better. In the Geography curriculum in an all-girls secondary school, deliberately planned fieldwork during and outside school curriculum time encourage critical inquiry, concept-based learning, as well as develop citizenship values. This presentation highlights how fieldwork is effective in creating a learning environment that is critical in achieving the key learning outcomes. Post-trip reflections have revealed that students’ learning has improved.

Roslinda Chan
Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary)
Singapore

Roslinda Chan is a Geography teacher, who also served as the Level Coordinator in overseeing curriculum planning and review for the level in the Humanities Department. She has been teaching for over 10 years in secondary schools in Singapore and for 8 years in the Gifted and Talented programme.


 

 

144 Learnings from a national community supporting professionals working with gifted and talented students in Aotearoa, New Zealand
Symposium, Advocacy

Since its inception in 2009 giftEDnz, the Professional Association for Gifted Education in Aotearoa, New Zealand has rapidly become a major network base and source of support for professionals working with gifted and talented students of all ages. Within this symposium, elected board members from giftEDnz will share the strategies they employ to support professionals from all curricular sectors in their work with gifted and talented children, including a Speakers’ Bureau, biennial conferences, and Special Interest Groups. There will be a Q & A session, in which attendees can ask questions about these initiatives and the challenges we have faced.

Louise Tapper
giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education (New Zealand)
New Zealand

Louise has been an advocate and educator in gifted and talented education for almost two decades as a teacher, parent educator, writer, lecturer in gifted education and experiences of parenting gifted children, and founder and current Chair of giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education. Louise completed her doctorate looking at the experiences of school for gifted and talented adolescents in Aotearoa New Zealand in 2014. She works currently as an independent education researcher and a contracted researcher for The Collaborative for Research and Training in Youth Health and Development, in community-based youth related projects in New Zealand

Nadine Ballam
giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education (New Zealand)
New Zealand

Nadine Ballam is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, and a primary trained teacher. She has recently completed her PhD, which investigated the lived experiences of gifted and talented young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Nadine is on the board of giftEDnz, The Professional Association for Gifted Education. She is also an Associate Editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.

Jo Dean
giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education (New Zealand)
New Zealand

Jo Dean is currently in a Senior Tutor position at The Institute of Education, Massey University in New Zealand. She is an early childhood trained teacher and regularly works alongside teachers, young children with gifted characteristics and their parents. Jo is currently undertaking her PhD, which is investigating ‘how young children and teachers co-create meaning when art installations serve as a catalyst for aesthetic exploration’. Jo is on the board of giftEDnz, The Professional Association for Gifted Education.

Andrea Delaune
giftEDnz: The Professional Association for Gifted Education (New Zealand)
New Zealand

Andrea Delaune is a passionate early childhood teacher who has worked in many aspects of early childhood education, from teacher to centre manager. As an educational researcher in Early Childhood Education Andrea has recently completed a Master’s Degree in Education entitled Gifted education for infants and toddlers in Aotearoa New Zealand: An insight into exemplary practice, and is currently working towards a PhD in early childhood education. Andrea is a proud wife, and mother of two young children who inspire her to be a better educator and person every day. Andrea is currently the elected Secretary of giftEDnz.


 

 

68 Like a Thousand Lizards on a Flatbed Truck: Integrating chaos and curricula for Gifted Learners
Parallel Session, Programming

Creating any program that allows students creative freedom while maintaining rigid scope and sequence is challenging, but trying to find that balance in a program while also managing 150 gifted and twice exceptional 12-14 year-olds (and their parents) may sound impossible. However, with the right strategies, this is easier than you may think! This presentation will offer a step-by-step process for creating a middle level gifted center program that functions as an optimal integrated system, one where students, teachers, and parents thrive!

Constance (Connie) Brown
Jefferson County Public Schools
United States

Connie Brown has been teaching for the last 29 years. In her career, she has taught grades 7-12 in theatre, communication, and English language arts in three different states. The last 9 years have been spent at the North Arvada Center for Gifted and Talented in Jefferson County, Colorado


 

 

42 Long-term effects of grade skipping – spanning 70 years
Parallel Session, G&T

In 2012, adults born between 1917-1987 were asked about their experiences with grade skipping. There were few problems concerning achievement, though a third of the children were bored again after skipping. Slightly more boys than girls had social problems. This could be improved by being good at sports. A few more boys than girls profited socially from skipping. With very few exceptions they passed the German equivalent of the A-levels and advanced in their studies. In the end, 90% of the women and almost 80% of the men would skip again if circumstances were the same.

Annette Heinbokel
German Association for the Gifted Child – DGhK
Germany

As a teacher, Annette Heinbokel has been an advocate of gifted education since the mid-70s. She has been a German delegate to the WCGTC since 1977 (with short interruptions). She was the driving force behind the founding of the German Association for the Gifted Child in 1978 and has served on its executive committee twice. Her PhD on grade skipping influenced the change of law in her state and influenced the attitude towards acceleration in Germany. She has conducted several studies on grade skipping, the latest (Skipping a grade – or I would have become fipsy) being published in 2016.


 

 

81 Making Gifted Education More Inclusive
Symposium, Diversity

In this session panelists address issues surrounding identifying, serving, and retaining diverse students from underrepresented groups, including those who come from Black, Latino, or Native cultures; who speak English as a second language; who come from low-income families; and/or who have been diagnosed as twice exceptional. The facilitator will draw parallels and note differences among the panelists and facilitate discussion with audience members. Using the panelists’ work as a foundation, the environment of this symposium will be one in which what is known will serve to generate new research plans, innovative ideas for practice, and experimentation likely to enhance inclusion.

Gilman W. Whiting
Vanderbilt
United States

Associate Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies and Director of Graduate Studies at Vanderbilt University. His areas of research include: race, sports, and American culture; educational disparity; welfare reform and fatherhood initiatives; special and gifted education. Whiting has authored over forty scholarly articles in journals such as Roeper Review, Journal for Secondary Gifted Education, and The International Journal of Sport and Society, and book chapters. Whiting is the creator of the Scholar Identity Model™; consults with school districts nationally and internationally; and is the founding chair of the Achievement Gap Institute for the George W. Peabody College of Education.

Marcia Gentry
Purdue University
United States

professor of Educational Studies, directs the Gifted Education Research Institute at Purdue University. She actively participates in NAGC and AERA, frequently contributes to the literature, has national and international partnerships, and regularly serves as a speaker and consultant. Marcia received multiple grants in support of her work with low-SES, Native American, and underrepresented gifted youth. Her research interests include student attitudes toward school; using cluster-grouping and differentiation to meet the needs of gifted youth while helping all students achieve at high levels; non-traditional settings for talent development; and the development and recognition of talent among underserved populations.

Nielsen Pereira
Purdue University
United States

Assistant Professor of Gifted, Creative, and Talented Studies at Purdue University. His research interests include the design and assessment of learning in varied gifted and talented education contexts, understanding gifted and talented student experiences in talent development programs, and conceptual and measurement issues in the identification of gifted and talented populations. He currently serves as Associate Editor for Gifted and Talented International and on the editorial board member for the Journal of Advanced Academics and Gifted Child Quarterly. He taught English as a second language for 12 years in public schools and language institutes in Brazil.

C. Matthew Fugate
University of Houston Downtown
United States

Assistant Professor, University of Houston, Downtown (Ph.D. Purdue University, 2014; Master’s UConn) Matthew worked as an elementary teacher, gifted and magnet coordinator for Houston Independent School District. Matthew’s research focuses on twice exceptionality. He examined the relationship between working memory and creativity among gifted ADHD students; coping mechanisms of twice-exceptional girls in secondary school concerning academics and interpersonal relationships; and he is a team member working to increase research, identification, and service of gifted Native Americans. He has presented to parents and teachers across the United States on topics including creativity, 2E, underserved populations, and Total School Cluster Grouping.

F. Richard Olenchak
Purdue University
United States

Professor and Head of Educational Studies at Purdue University, was Associate Provost at the University of Houston, and Special Education Chair and Teacher Education Director at the University of Alabama. He has been President of the: National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC); International Future Problem Solving Program (FPSP); and Association for the Education of Gifted Underachieving Students (AEGUS). Publications include the second edition of Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults, the first edition of which was 2005’s USA Psychology Book of the Year. His interest in underserved students serves as a platform for all of his work.


 

 

102 Making It Work: Supporting and Measuring Growth in a Gifted Cluster Grouping Model
Parallel Session, G&T

In many countries cluster-grouping has become a prevalent model for serving gifted students. Schools experiencing success with the model have methods in place for measuring and documenting growth. Learn how to prepare for program evaluation in your cluster-grouping model by creating systems that track student achievement, determine necessary training, and monitor student populations identified and served. Participants learn to use school data to effectively plan advanced C&I, identify criteria for documenting student performance, provide requisite teacher training, and make effective student placements. Achievement studies for all students in schools that cluster group gifted students will be shared.

Dina Brulles
Arizona State University
United States

Dina Brulles, Ph.D., is the Director of Gifted Education at Paradise Valley Unified School District in Arizona also the Gifted Program Coordinator at Arizona State University. The gifted programs Dina oversees incorporate innovative uses of technology, enfranchise underrepresented populations and provide extensive professional development opportunities. Dina serves on the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Board of Directors as the school district representative. Dr. Brulles co-authored the books, Differentiated Lessons for All Learners, The Cluster Grouping Handbook: How To Challenge Gifted Students and Improve Achievement For All, Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classrooms, and Helping All Gifted Children Learn.


 

 

295 Mapping common ground: Relationships between giftedness, introversion, and heightened sensitivities
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Prior research suggests a disproportionate level of introversion and heightened sensitivities among the gifted population. Curiously, one main variable found to contribute to introversion is heightened sensitivity of the central nervous system. The current study hypothesised that a positive relationship between giftedness and introversion could be explained by these heightened sensitivities. 674 participants completed a personality scale and the Highly Sensitive Person Scale. Structural equation modelling showed a positive relationship between giftedness and introversion, once controlling for openness-to-experience. This relationship was mediated by two sensitivity sub-factors. Implications for working with gifted individuals and areas for further research will be discussed.

Jodie Valpied
The University of Melbourne
Australia

Jodie Valpied is a researcher in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne. She currently works in the Department of General Practice at the University, and is nearing completion of her PhD through the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences. Formerly a teacher, Jodie specialises in introversion, heightened sensitivities and research on sensitive topics. She has experience in both quantitative and qualitative research, and enjoys applying statistical knowledge to complex issues in practical ways. In her spare time, Jodie can be found in the garden or walking her highly sensitive Italian Greyhound along the river.


 

 

232 Mapping gifted knowing and thinking in the classroom: A prelude to effective differentiated pedagogy
Parallel Session, G&T

This study reports the use of concept mapping to identify gifted knowing and thinking in the classroom. A cohort of 150 fifth graders was exposed to concepts from topics in science and history. They used concept mapping to generate possible relationships between the concepts. Semantic analysis was used to identify the quality and complexity of the relationships. The gifted students generated more valid propositions, more hierarchical links between concepts, and displayed fluid analogistic thinking. The domain of giftedness influenced the outcomes. The study shows how concept mapping can assist teachers to identify gifted learners, compile learning profiles and differentiate teaching.

John Munro
Australian Catholic University
Australia

Dr Munro is Professor of Educational Psychology and Exceptional Learning in the Faculty of Arts and Education, Australian Catholic University. He is a qualified primary and secondary teacher and a psychologist. His teaching and research interests are in gifted education, literacy and math learning and learning difficulties, instructional leadership, school improvement and learning internationally. He has written state and national curricula in Australia. He has produced a range of teacher resources and professional learning materials for the state and independent school systems. He has provided consultancy to several international education projects including the Aga Khan Academies and the International Baccalaureate.

Joseph Santoro
Australian Catholic University
Australia

Dr Santoro is a student advisor in the Student Support Unit at the Australian Catholic University. He previously worked in primary schools assisting students with special needs and as a data analyst and consultant.


 

 

200 Meeting young children’s emotional needs through transitions
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

There are many misconceptions around children’s emotional sensitivities in new situations. Often young gifted children are seen as capable and confident learners in an early childhood context, however, moving from a secure setting into a new unknown setting can be very daunting. Changes through major transitions can create high anxiety levels if supportive strategies are not put in place. Equitable transition processes ensure children with diverse learning abilities develop a sense of confidence, trust, and belonging in a new setting. Positive strategies to support anxious gifted children through transition will be identified through a New Zealand context.

Jo Dean
Massey University
New Zealand

Jo Dean is currently in a Senior Tutor position at The Institute of Education, Massey University in New Zealand. She is an early childhood trained teacher and regularly works alongside teachers, young children with gifted characteristics and their parents. Jo is currently undertaking her PhD, which is investigating ‘How young children and teachers co-create meaning when art installations serve as a catalyst for aesthetic exploration’. Jo is on the board of giftEDnz, The Professional Association for Gifted Education in Aotearoa New Zealand.


 

 

209 Mentoring for gifted secondary students: A unique school/university partnership
Parallel Session, Programming

Research and experience show that secondary schools do not always meet gifted adolescent students’ intellectual, creative, and affective needs. An extension Mentoring program which fosters high-level challenge under expert guidance allows gifted students to follow academic and creative passions alongside like-minded peers. This presentation will explore the unique partnership between a leading Australian independent girls’ school, universities, and art galleries to implement an academically accelerated research program for gifted adolescents (14-17 years), allied with the school’s ‘activity-reflection’ Student Portfolio. Developmental models underpinning the innovative program include: Gagné’s DMGT 2.0, the Actiotope Model and the International Baccalaureate Learner Profile.

Susan Knopfelmacher
Presbyterian Ladies’ College, Melbourne
Australia

Susan Knopfelmacher has worked for over thirty years in leading positions at University, State and Independent schools. Currently, she is Head of Gifted Education and Extension Programs at Presbyterian Ladies’ College, Melbourne, where she mentors engaged, passionate learners who represent Victoria and Australia in leading symposia, competitions and Olympiads. Susan runs a unique partnership with leading universities to provide academic research mentoring for high ability students and has presented numerous papers and workshops, nationally and internationally, on gifted teaching, learning, leadership and curriculum design. Susan is currently in her fourth term as an elected Australian Delegate to the WCGTC.


 

 

383 Methods for increasing twice exceptional self-efficacy: ways to enhance “I can do it!”
Parallel Session, 2e

Self-efficacy the academic concept of self pertains to one’s abilities to successfully complete a task or goal (Bandura 1997). Research into self-efficacy has previously investigated efficacy of gifted and non-gifted individuals but rarely twice-exceptional children and adolescents. The goal of this presentation is to utilise the four sources of self-efficacy (past experience, verbal persuasion, vicarious reinforcement, and physiological reactions) to create and share efficacy builders, activities known to raise self-efficacy in twice exceptional learners.

Claire Spicer
Deakin University
Australia

Dr Claire Spicer is an academic who specialises in working with gifted individuals. She has worked with gifted people throughout their lifespan and researches in the field of twice exceptionality; social and emotional facets of giftedness and self-efficacy.


 

 

356 Middle School Students in Full-Time Gifted Programming
Poster, School Alternatives

This presentation is an informational account of a 20-year program created to identify and serve the full-time educational needs of highly gifted middle school students within a center-city high school. The presenter will lead participants in a group discussion about student success and achievement within gifted programs including accelerated curriculum, student experiences, technology, and community partnerships.

Lenae Lazzelle
Springfield Public Schools
United States

Dr. Lenae Lazzelle is the Director of the Phelps Center for Gifted Education, Springfield Public Schools. The Center is home to 900 K-8 students in three separate gifted programs. Dr. Lazzelle serves on the Missouri Gifted Advisory Council, Gifted Association Missouri-President, NAGC-State Affiliate, and Drury University’s Pre-College, VicePresident. Dr. Lazzelle has been recognized with the GAM Friend of Gifted Award and most recently the NAGC Coordinator of the Year. Published work include: Student Perceptions of Engagement in Part-time and Full-time Gifted Programs, Improving Achievement in Minority and Poverty Gifted Populations, and Meeting the Needs of Highly Gifted Students.


 

 

346 Mind the Gap: Youngsters Growing Up in the Digital Age
Parallel Session, Ed Tech

Do young learners really just “pick up” technology or is something else going on? Mobile technology has changed the home environment of young learners affecting family relationships. What do young children know about technology and how do they know it? This parallel session shares and sheds light on emerging research focused on technology and family relationships.

Laura Hayward
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
United States

Laura Hayward is a third year doctoral student in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Her specialty is Educational Technology. Her research focus is educational technology in the prekindergarten- grade 3 (USA) learning environment. She is an experienced, certified teacher of academically students in both United States (Texas and Louisiana) and abroad. She currently teaches in Texas.


 

 

123 Mindfulness and Development: Exploring the Role of Mindfulness in Supporting Students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Meditation has existed for thousands of years as a means of stilling the mind and exploring the inner world. This practice is becoming more popular in Western culture as scientists are documenting the physiological changes that take place in the body during mindfulness (Greenberg, & Harris, 2012). Educators are using this information to help students discover the practice of mindfulness in an effort to reduce anxiety and cultivate internal resources (Zelazo & Lyons, 2012).

Laurie Croft
University of Iowa
United States

Laurie Croft is a clinical associate professor at the University of Iowa and is the associate director for professional development at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. Croft has made presentations at various state, national, and international conferences, and to parent groups, teachers, and school boards. She coordinates a comprehensive program of online classes that comprise an endorsement in gifted education, and she serves as the College of Education honors advisor. She is currently a US delegate to the WCGTC.


 

 

45 Mindsets and the development of talented dance students
Parallel Session, G&T

Of the many students who attend dance classes, there are a few who show high levels of ability that could be developed so that a talented child becomes a highly accomplished adult dancer. The way students view their abilities influences their motivation to dance and their development as dancers. Mindsets make an important contribution to motivation and achievement. This paper outlines the way fixed and growth mindsets can inhibit or enhance a talented dance student’s development. There is a description of the Talent Development Mega-Model that incorporates mindsets. Growth mindset is discussed with reference to the ballerina Darcey Bussell.

Penny Van Deur
Flinders University
Australia

Dr Penny Van Deur, Lecturer in Teacher Education in the School of Education at Flinders University holds a PhD and MA in educational psychology, as well as a Master of Gifted Education. Currently her research and teaching involve issues surrounding self-directed learning, the development of inquiry in schools, school-wide support for inquiry, the International Baccalaureate and inquiry, gifted education and the education of students with learning difficulties and working with Middle School students. Her publications include chapters in four books, six research journal articles, one research report, commissioned research by the IBO, as well as more than twenty conference presentations.


 

 

355 Mirrors
Poster, Identification

The mirrors reflect the identification of the tendencies, interests, capabilities, objectives, and patterns of learning for the student to provide special services according to their highest strength points. A set of substantive tools will be used, which have their psychometric properties taken into account in the local environment such as multiple intelligences measurement, the evaluation of behavioral attributes measurement, and the methods of expression measurement. It also includes unofficial measurements which consists of a group of assignments that depend on the specialized observation of timely performance levels which allows to make decisions about the comprehensive differentiation file of the student.

Mohammad Awadh Rawas
Ministry of Education
Saudi Arabia

head of the department of gifted and talented in Makka, Saudi Arabia. has many publications in Arabic journals presented hundreds of workshops in the field member in many associations in the field


 

 

277 Multi-Genre Projects: Rigor and Creativity in the Classroom
Poster, Programming

Have you ever wondered how to enhance the instruction of your content in such a way that students are challenged, engaged, enthusiastic, and proud to share their learning? Multi-genre projects allow learners to expand their knowledge and communicate to others in a variety of genres. Over the last 10 years, we have incorporated multi-genre projects into our instruction to deepen learning, encourage independence, and allow the creativity and voice of learners to shine. Our poster presentation will highlight related research, offer suggestions for guidelines for engaging learners in multi-genre projects, and showcase examples from kindergartners through graduate students.

Susanna Hapgood
University of Toledo
United States

Dr. Susanna Hapgood is an Associate Professor at the University of Toledo’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. There she teaches undergraduate and graduate classes on literacy teaching and learning. Her research interests include the design of texts and experiences that foster young children’s content area literacy, particularly scientific literacy. A qualitative researcher, she has over 20 years experience in science education in classrooms and informal settings. She has published articles Educational Leadership, Elementary School Journal and the Journal of the Learning Sciences.

Martha Champa
Martha Champa
United States

  Dr. Martha Champa is an educator fascinated by the learning experiences of her students. Through the years, she has taught young people in all grades, from grade 1 through graduate school. Currently, she prepares teachers in literacy instruction at the University of Toledo. To keep herself grounded in day-to-day practice, she also teaches gifted middle school students at Washington Local Schools in Toledo, Ohio. She has been observing the effect of teaching content while incorporating creativity. These observations led her to the topic of her doctoral dissertation: creativity from the perspective of young creators.


 

 

118 Multiple Identification Model for the Gifted Children in India
Parallel Session, G&T

Addressing the socio-political untenability of a gifted education programme, the NIAS model attempts to demystify the concept and challenges the resistance to the idea of giftedness in India. Using Renzulli’s (1985) model the NIAS identification protocol uses teacher nominations, followed by administration of general intelligence and creativity tests for mainstream schools. However, cultural psychology and activity theory suggest that community specific activities are authentic indicators of giftedness. Therefore, identification of gifted children among these communities use community-relevant profiling and portfolio documentation as valid methods for rural/tribal children in India.

Anitha Kurup
National Institute of Advanced Studies
India

Anitha Kurup is Dean and Professor,National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, and anchors the education programme (http://www.nias.res.in/aboutnias-peoplefaculty-bkanitha.php). Currently, she anchors the National Programme on Gifted Education- an initiative of the Office of the Principal Scientific Advisor to Government of India. As part of the National programme on gifted education, Dr. Kurup has developed and standardised tools for identification of the gifted children (3-18 years) across rural and urban population in India. She has initiated work for developing a national platform of mentors for the gifted children. For more about the programme, visit PRODIGY at www.prodigy.net.in.

Shalini Dixit*

Dr. Shalini Dixit: is an Assistant Professor at NIAS. She has her PhD from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She has had a broad exposure to all the foundational areas of psychology and has specialized in Cultural and Cognitive Processes and critical aspects of Educational Psychology and Cultural Processes. Apart from teaching in University of Delhi, she has earlier worked with tribal children in Southern Rajasthan with Save the Children and has done ethnographic study in her doctoral work with the Santali Tribal Community in Jharkhand, India.

Ajay Chandra*

Ajay Chandra is working as a Research Associate at the National Institute of Advanced studies (NIAS) Bangalore.​ ​He has been working in the field of Gifted Education over the past five years.​ ​ As part of the research work, he has engaged himself in conducting classroom observations, conducting teacher training workshops,​ conducting workshops for children,​ data analysis and also involved in field studies. His areas of interests are cognitive psychology, cross cultural psychology, Psychometry and education. ​He has also worked as a visiting lecturer, where he taught psychology for bachelor’s students. ​


 

 

205 Narrative inquiry into practitioners’ perspectives of gifted education in South Australia
Parallel Session, Leadership

This presentation will report about doctoral research conducted using narrative inquiry to explore and interpret the experiences of three practitioners who have been instrumental to the development of gifted education in South Australia. The results are significant in the telling of the practitioners’ stories, and in the construction of an interpretation of the past and a vision for the future of gifted education in South Australia. The stories will be presented as ‘thinking-tools’ (Moen, 2006) to provoke the audience to reflect on and engage in professional learning and practices that specifically focus on improved outcomes for gifted and talented students.

Lesley Henderson
Flinders University
Australia

Lesley coordinates the Gifted Education specialization at Flinders University and is the Assistant Dean, Teaching and Learning in the School of Education. She is the SA Director on the Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented (AAEGT), and the AAEGT representative on the Australian Alliance of Associations in Education (AAAE).


 

 

114 Navigating a Post-Truth World: The Affective Impact of Introducing Literary Theory To Gifted Students
Parallel Session, Programming

This research study examines the impact of introducing literary theory to a group of gifted students in Singapore aged fifteen to sixteen. Using data from student interviews, surveys, class responses, and assignments, this study evaluates how the inclusion of literary theory in the curriculum helps to meet the affective needs of these students via the adoption of a critical pedagogy framework.

James Koh
Raffles Institution
Singapore

James Koh has been an educator for close to seventeen years. He is currently the Dean of the Raffles Teacher Academy in Raffles Institution, where he looks after the following areas: professional development and accreditation, teaching innovation and research, education technology, and standards & assessment.


 

 

22 Out on a limb!
Parallel Session, Creativity

Taking creativity into the classroom is taking teaching and learning ‘out on a limb.’ How can creativity enhance policy and hence curriculum practices in today’s educational frontier! The presenters will use a Compare and Contrast tool to review the increasingly important place of creativity in curriculum around the world and interrogate how it is impacting on 2017 curriculum.

Susan Nikakis
Catholic Education Melbourne

Dr Susan Nikakis MELBOURNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA is the Senior Gifted Education Officer at Catholic Education Melbourne She embraced her current role in 2009 and is responsible for leading gifted and talented education programs for teachers throughout Victoria.

She has been Sessional Lecturer in the Master of Education Courses at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education with the University of Melbourne and is now lecturing sessionally at the Australian catholic University St Patrick’s Campus Melbourne.

Susan is the editor and author of Let the Tall Poppies Flourish, Expert Educators and her third book is entitled Giftedness illuminated by Creativity.

Geraldine Nicholas
Victorian Association for Gifted and Talented Children

Geraldine Nicholas is an educational consultant who has had a range of experiences as an educator of both adults and children.

Geraldine has worked as a class teacher in secondary classrooms within the Science field from junior to senior levels and has a passion for providing enriching experiences for the gifted and talented student. Geraldine currently works with teachers and students to ensure that the field of creative thinking and the use of associated thinking tools and strategies enhances the learning experience. Geraldine completed her Masters of Education at the University of Melbourne in 2013.


 

 

97 Parenting Gifted Children 101: An Introduction to Gifted Kids and Their Needs
Parallel Session, Parenting

This session shares an introductory mini-course for parents who want to better understand and help their gifted child. Educators are encouraged to replicate the course in their schools. Topics include myths, the hows and whys of advocacy, strategies for partnering with schools, and more. The course explores ways for parents to help their child at home and maximize their child’s educational experience with strategies that are based on research, but easy to implement. Insights from dozens of parents and educators of gifted children will be shared. Participants will leave with information and resources to better educate and partner with parents.

Tracy Inman
Western Kentucky University
United States

Dr. Tracy Ford Inman, associate director of The Center for Gifted Studies at Western Kentucky University, is a parent of gifted young men, teaches gifted children, and trains teachers of the gifted. In addition to writing articles and chapters, Tracy has co-authored three books with Julia Roberts. They received the Legacy Book Award for Strategies for Differentiating Instruction: Best Practices for the Classroom. Tracy was co-editor of Legacy Award-winning Parenting Gifted Children: The Authoritative Guide from the National Association for Gifted Children. Her latest co-authored book is Parenting Gifted Children 101: An Introduction to Gifted Kids and Their Needs.


 

 

39 Parents of Twice Exceptional Children: A Panel Presentation for Teachers and Parents
Symposium, 2e

Twice-exceptional students are individuals whose families and teachers typically struggle to provide for their social and academic wellbeing. This symposium draws on the experiences of four parents of twice-exceptional children to demonstrate how they are negotiating school and home experiences through supporting the child’s disability while allowing expression of their giftedness. These parents have dealt with a range of very formidable issues, including: the use of prescribed medicines, obtaining disability adjustments for external examinations, managing family life, and fostering self-esteem in children who are often facing significant challenges.

Gabrielle Oslington
Macquarie University
Australia

Dr Oslington is Gifted and Talented Coordinator at an independent school in Sydney. She has responsibility for the students whose academic ability places their needs beyond the normal differentiation provided by the classroom teacher, and works with children across their primary schooling. Her students have exceptional successes in inter-school competitions, particularly in Mathematics. Dr Oslington has a particular interest in the needs of twice exceptional children, and has post-graduate training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. To complement her teaching, Dr Oslington is currently enrolled at Macquarie University working on a doctoral dissertation on mathematical reasoning in young gifted mathematicians.

Michelle Meltzer

Belinda Cooley

Belinda is a senior health worker with over 20 years’ experience Belinda is a specialist in the areas of children, young people and mental health. Belinda has worked as a guest lecturer at the University of New South Wales and the University of Sydney. Belinda holds a Bachelor of Social Work and is a qualified primary school teacher. Belinda has had two practice papers published, one focusing on children and domestic violence, the other paper focuses on supervising students who have a disability. Belinda is also the parent of a daughter, aged 13 years, identified as gifted with dyslexia.

Louise Dutton


 

 

181 Partnerships with parents of young gifted children: Early childhood teachers’ perspectives in NSW, Australia
Parallel Session, Misc

Despite a policy of partnership with parents and research evidence of reliable parent identification of giftedness, we know little about early childhood teachers’ experiences with parents of young gifted children. A survey of 80 teachers in New South Wales preschool and childcare settings showed reasonable alignment with recommended practice, based more on experience of gifted children than their minimal training in gifted education. Most teachers felt confident interacting with parents amid reported agreements and disagreements about children’s abilities and appropriate responses. Uncertainty about early entry, formal assessment, identification, and provision suggests that professional development is needed.

Kerry Hodge
Macquarie University
Australia

Dr Kerry Hodge has conducted research into giftedness in early childhood and its implications for children, their teachers and parents. She has lectured at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in gifted education at Macquarie University where she is an honorary associate. Kerry currently is Director of Research and Development at a Sydney non-profit organisation that delivers research-based education and support services to children aged 0-5 with special learning needs, their parents and teachers. Kerry was awarded the 2009 Nancy Fairfax Churchill Fellowship to investigate programs for gifted preschoolers and teacher training in early gifted education in North America and the UK.


 

 

103 Pathways to Professional Proficiency in Gifted Education: A Process and Product
Parallel Session, Advocacy

Do you need to increase the capacity of educators to meet the needs of gifted students? A recent partnership between the Colorado Education Department and universities in Colorado has resulted in a defined series of pathways for gifted endorsement and licensure in Colorado. Join us to learn about the process implemented by the Colorado Consortium of Educators of Gifted Teacher Education (CCGETE) as well as gain information about the standards for the three pathways of “Core,” “Specialist,” and “Administrator” licensure. This session will provide information about an inclusive process that brings stakeholders to the table for collaboration and commitment.

Julia Watson
University of Denver, Colorado Dept of Education
United States

Julia Watson, PhD, currently serves as the Gifted Education Regional Consultant (GERC) for 19 school districts and works as a researcher and professor at the University of Denver. She has been an educator for 40 years, as a teacher (K-college), an administrator, staff developer, teacher-coach, and district facilitator. She has worked in Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, Arkansas, Nebraska, and for 13 years in Hawaii. Areas of expertise include Curriculum, Assessment, Leadership, and Gifted/Talented. She was nominated as Outstanding Educator of the Year, for Outstanding Dissertation (1997) and was inducted into the Colorado Academy of Educators for Gifted, Talented, & Creative.

Norma Hafenstein
University of Denver
United States

Dr. Hafenstein’s award-winning professional career spans numerous positions in leadership and scholarship. She is a Full Clinical Professor in the Teaching and Learning Sciences Department, founded the Ricks Center for Gifted Children, a PS-8 school on the campus, in 1984, and founded the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education in 1997. She presents extensively on giftedness at national and international conferences. Dr. Hafenstein has presented at the International Dabrowski Congress, Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted Annual Conference (SENG), World Council on Gifted and Talented Children Biennial World Conference (WCGTC), and the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA).


 

 

296 Peer perceptions of academically high-performing adolescents in regular classrooms: A country-comparative analysis of gender and academic achievement level
Poster, Social/Emotional

This comparative international study investigated how students in mixed-ability seventh-grade classrooms in six countries (Australia, UK, Spain, Peru, South Korea, and Vietnam) perceived a fictitious academically able peer. Using a hypothetical figure in each country group, empirical research data was gathered through quantitative methods. Gender issues were explored through the gender of the perceiver and the gender of the high performer. The fictitious high-performing students’ intellectual ability, positive social traits, and popularity were detected differently among the countries in the gender of the perceiver. Only the popularity of the high-performing boy and girl was differently expected among the country groups.

Hyerim Oh
Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg
Germany

04.2015-:Involved in Project Emirates Gifted Identification Kit for the United Arab

2013-: Academic researcher, Educational Psychology and Excellence Research, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

1 Oct 12 – : PhD work, University of Erlangen Nuremberg (Germany), Educational psychology and excellence research

2009 – 2011: Master of arts studies in abilities and development of competences, Leipzig (Germany) Education

2007-2008: Korean Teacher, secondary school in Global Vision Christian School

2003-2007: Bechelor of Art, Inha University, Incheon (South Korea), Education (major), Korean and Korean literature for teachers


 

 

211 Peer Perceptions of Talented Students in Korea
Poster, Social/Emotional

The purpose of this study is to investigate the peer perceptions of talented students. We asked students to describe their thoughts about the talented students. We distinguished talented students into academically high-achieving, gifted, and creative students. A total of 319 middle school students participated in this study. Factor analysis showed that there were seven peer perceived characteristics of academically high achieving, six characteristics of gifted, and six characteristics of creative students. The results showed that Korean students distinguished academically high achieving, gifted, and creative students differently. Overall, peers perceived talented students positively.

Myung-Seop Kim*

Doctoral Student

Seon-Young Lee
Seoul National University
South Korea

Associate Professor

Keunchan Baek
Seoul National University
South Korea

Doctoral Student

Jongho Shin*

Professor


 

 

148 Performance in working memory and attentional networks in gifted children
Parallel Session, G&T

The aim of this study is to explore the working memory capacity (WMC) and its determinants in intellectually gifted children (IGC) and intellectually average children (IAC). The relationship between the WMC and intelligence seems to be explained by attentional abilities. Thus, we used a composite and adaptive complex span task to assess the WMC. In addition, we assessed the attentional abilities with the Attention Network Test (ANT). Our results show that IGC have a higher WMC than IAC. We discuss this WMC difference between both groups, in light of the attentional networks evaluated by the ANT.

Alexandre Aubry
CRP-CPO [Research Center in Psychology : Cognition, Psychism, Organizations] (EA 7273)
France

Psychologist and a PhD student at the University of Picardie Jules Verne, France. His doctorate thesis is funded by the Regional Council of Picardie (RCP) and European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and consists in studying the cognitive functioning and the scholastic adaptation of the intellectually gifted children. His thesis is in the part of the project « HPISCOL. Enfants et adolescents à haut potentiel : Identification et scolarisation ». His research interests are focused on cognitive functioning of the gifted students, specifically on their working memory capacity.

Béatrice Bourdin*

She is an associate professor at the University of Picardie Jules Verne, France. She is the codirector of the Research Center in Psychology: Cognition, Psyche, Organizations (CRP-CPO, EA 7273). His main fields of research are the cognitive development in typically and atypically children, specifically the gifted children. She is coordinating a project funded by the Regional Council of Picardie (CRP) and European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) called HPISCOL about the cognitive functioning of the gifted students and their scholastic adaptation.


 

 

317 Personal best goal setting and self-regulation for engagement of gifted children in an enrichment programme
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Developing social and emotional competencies includes building personal goal setting and self-regulation skills. This presentation will address the question: What are parents’ perspectives of their gifted children’s PB goal setting and self-regulation for engagement in an enrichment programme? Little is known about benefits or concerns regarding community enrichment programmes or about influences of these programmes on the social and emotional development of intellectually gifted students. This presentation reports initial findings from a quantitative survey regarding parental perspectives of influences on children’s participation in a university enrichment programme. Key early findings and implications for practice and research will be provided.

Susen Smith

Australia

Dr Susen Smith is Senior Lecturer in Gifted and Special Education and GERRIC Senior Research Fellow at UNSW, Australia. Susen’s research interests include: Differentiating curriculum and pedagogy for gifted students, and she developed the Model of Dynamic Differentiation (MoDD) for supporting students with multi-exceptionalities and gifted underachievers and socio-emotional learning needs. She’s been visiting scholar at Columbia University, CUNY, and the Hong Kong Institute of Education, guest editor of the AJGE, is published and has keynoted internationally. Susen is recipient of UNE Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Achievements in Interdisciplinary Research Innovation and UNSW Excellence in Postgraduate Research Award.

Ben North

Australia

Dr Ben North is a NSW Department of Education consultant in gifted education. He has a PhD and Master of Education in Gifted Education, was Head Teacher at Engadine High School, and is a recipient of a NSW Director-General’s Teaching Award in Excellence in Teaching and Service to Public Education, and the Sydney Region Teaching Excellence Award. His PhD is titled Under Pressure: Senior secondary student responses to academic pressure in high stakes assessment contexts. He is a GERRIC guest lecturer in gifted education courses at UNSW, Australia. He is also a sought after guest speaker and media consultant.

Andrew Martin*

Andrew Martin is Professor of Educational Psychology in the School of Education at the University of New South Wales Australia specializing in motivation, engagement, achievement, and quantitative research methods. He is also Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford, Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, and President of the International Association of Applied Psychology’s Division 5 Educational, Instructional, and School Psychology.


 

 

191 Philosophy for children: Our story of Philosophy withdrawal gifted groups influencing whole school curriculum change
Parallel Session, Programming

As educators of gifted students, ensuring our pedagogy is focused on teaching students how to question in order to create new answers can be challenging. Philosophical inquiry can equip students to become confident lifelong learners able to interact constructively, open-mindedly, and respectfully. This multimodal presentation illustrates the journey of a South Australian school in a low socioeconomic area that is implementing a dual stream Philosophy program addressing the needs of highly able learners in withdrawal groups and whole class settings. It focuses on student voice and provides an overall snapshot of our journey to date.

Craig Davidson
Southern Vales Christian College
Australia

Craig Davidson is a Philosophy, English, and Physical Education teacher specialising in gifted education enrichment and extension programs. He teaches at the Middle/Secondary level at Southern Vales Christian College in South Australia. Some of the programs he helps facilitate along with the Philosophy program are Tournament of Minds and debating. The challenge to support and celebrate the accomplishments of gifted students in similar ways to skilled athletes inspires his continued investment in gifted education. Craig’s ongoing professional development in gifted education intentionally focuses his mainstream pedagogy on differentiation and building communities of inquiry.

Rebecca Napier
Southern Vales Christian College
Australia

Rebecca is a PhD candidate and sessional staff member at Flinders University. Her PhD investigates the career development experiences of gifted adolescent girls. Her educational positions in Australia and Canada have ranged from special education to mainstream teaching to gifted education. Rebecca is currently a gifted education coordinator at two sister schools. Philosophy teaching is one of her current passions in this role. Volunteering with several not-for-profit gifted associations has enriched her experience in the field. Raising two of her own gifted adolescents currently provides her with many interesting adventures. Music and nature are two of her greatest loves.


 

 

184 Planning and delivering learning for verbally gifted students in secondary school
Parallel Session, Programming

Challenge: valuing the uniqueness of the verbally gifted child; recognising and nurturing their talent; propelling them towards attaining eminence. This challenge meant developing a model where the child became the centre of a circle of learning. The wise, independent, motivated, learner who had a voice that was central to their learning, and where the child had a realisation of academic self-efficacy. Initiating practice that acknowledged the relationship between verbal giftedness, intrinsic motivation and acknowledging personal epistemology was pivotal in striving for optimal growth from the child’s educational experience. Participants will use their mobile phones to be part of the experience.

Shane Kamsner
Carey Baptist Grammar School
Australia

Shane Kamsner is Head of Student Development at Carey Baptist Grammar School. He is a teacher and psychologist whose interest in the area of Gifted and Talented education has been focused on teaching best practice and the role of differentiation in support of highly students. Shane developed Carey’s model of curriculum focused delivery for highly able students and is a strong proponent of personalised learning. Shane has also been a sessional lecturer at the University of Melbourne and the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne in the area of The Psychology of Exceptional Learners.

Carolyn Giles
Carey Baptist Grammar School
Australia

Carolyn Giles an experienced and innovative educator, founded Born to Soar in 2013, providing educational learning opportunities for gifted students through Centres for Gifted and Talented (One Day Schools) located in Melbourne, virtual classrooms reaching gifted students across Australia and Asia and professional learning for teachers in gifted education. Currently holding positions as Talent Development Coordinator at Carey Baptist Grammar School; the Vice-President of the Victorian Association for Gifted and Talented Children and the Victorian head of Future Problem Solving Australia; she is a parent of gifted children and passionately advocates for gifted families and the teachers who support them.


 

 

131 Predictors of STEM career intentions for gifted international exchange students with Australian educational experiences
Parallel Session, Guidance

This mixed methods study investigated the predictors of STEM career intentions for gifted Brazilian undergraduate students with educational experiences in Australia. In the first phase, interviews were undertaken with 22 gifted Brazilian exchange students studying in STEM fields. Thereafter, the emerging themes were assessed using a survey completed by 374 gifted Brazilian exchange students. The findings indicated that intellectual stimulation predicted STEM career intentions for participants who had recently arrived in Australia, while intellectual stimulation, employment prospects, and income predicted STEM career intentions for participants who had studied in Australia for more than three months.

Peta K. Hay
The University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr Peta K. Hay is a lecturer at The University of New South Wales, teaching postgraduate and undergraduate gifted education. Her PhD examined the moral reasoning and empathy in gifted children, and Peta continues to be interested in the socio-emotional aspects of giftedness. Peta is part of UNSW’s miniCOGE team, who provide schools with professional learning on effective gifted and talented education.

Jae Yup Jung
The University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr. Jae Yup Jung is a Senior Lecturer, a GERRIC Senior Research Fellow and a former Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow in the School of Education at UNSW. The focus of his research is on the decision-making of gifted adolescents on topics such as careers, university entrance and friendships, usually incorporating cultural and motivational perspectives. His research has been recognised with awards from the American Educational Research Association and Mensa International. He is the editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education and a member of the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly and the Journal of Employment Counselling.

Tay T.R. Koo*

Tay Koo has an academic background in geography and economics with emphasis on aviation management. He studies tourism as an important channel through which greater understanding of the societal and spatial impact of commercial aviation can be gained. His primary research interest involves measuring and explaining the spatial (in)equality of visitor dispersal and its co-evolution with air transport network. Tay’s primary publications are in the area of transport geography, air transport management, tourism management and tourism economics.


 

 

255 Problem Solvers Today – Leaders Tomorrow!
Symposium, Creativity

The 21st Century requires powerful and effective global leaders – and these leaders must possess effective problem solving skills. Gifted students do not automatically develop into leaders or problem solvers, rather students must be provided appropriate tools that lead to acquired behaviors needed for this enormous task/responsibility. The Partnership for 21st Century Learning identified the 4-C’s: Collaboration, Communication, Creativity, and Critical Thinking – all of which are addressed within Creative Problem Solving (CPS). Teachers must be well informed in CPS to provide the essential skills required to form future leaders who will make a positive difference globally.

April Dennis
FPSPI, Inc.
United States

April Dennis has served as the Program Director of Future Problem Solving Program International (FPSPI) since 2012. With a background in advanced curriculum strategies and highly engaging learning techniques, April enjoys being part of a student-driven organization designed to promote students as leaders.

A graduate of the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor’s in Elementary Education and the University of South Florida with a Masters in Gifted Education, April’s passion is providing challenging curriculum for 21st century students so they are equipped with problem solving and ethical leadership skills for the future.

Niranjan Casinader
Future Problem Solving Program Australia
Australia

Dr Niranjan Casinader is Senior Lecturer in Education at Monash University, with a special focus on the cultural dimensions of education, especially relating to curriculum, pedagogy, globalisation, teacher capacity and the teaching of Humanities. One of Niranjan’s continuing interests is the integration of thinking skills into classroom curriculum, and he has published extensively on the connections between culture and the practice of thinking skills across national boundaries. Currently, he also serves as National Director of Future Problem Solving Program in Australia, and was on the International Board of Trustees from 2007-2015.

Nicola Desoe
Future Problem Solving Program Australia
Australia

Ms Nicola Desoe has a Diploma of Teaching (Primary) from the Brisbane College of Advanced Education, a Bachelor of Education from the University of South Australia and a Certificate of Gifted Education from the University of New South Wales. She has taught in rural, regional and urban Primary Classrooms for over 20 years, including 10 years as Co-ordinator of Gifted Programming. She has developed and taught gifted programs at four schools. Her particular area of interest is Future Problem Solving where she now serves as the Primary Programs Co-ordinator on the National Committee and on the International Topics Committee.


 

 

242 Problem-Based Learning: An Apprenticeship in Expert Thinking
Parallel Session, Programming

Discussion of Problem-Based Learning has focused on ill-structured problems. However, the heart of the model is the transformation of the student from child to apprentice. The problem creates a landscape for a cognitive apprenticeship that transports students into an expert-like mindset. Through example and discussion, this presentation will focus on the power of Problem-Based Learning to create apprenticeships. Research and experience will demonstrate how the story-like narrative of PBL transmits content and transforms learners, with particular emphasis on the alignment among between PBL, the characteristics of gifted students, and the aims of gifted education.

Shelagh Gallagher

United States

Dr. Shelagh A. Gallagher has worked with gifted students, their teachers and parents from Charlotte to Kazakhstan. She has devoted much of her career to developing and testing Problem-Based Learning curriculum for gifted students. Seven of these units have won the NAGC Curriculum Division Award for Outstanding Curriculum. Dr. Gallagher has also has conducted research and published articles on topics including personality attributes and giftedness, developmental and academic needs of gifted adolescents, questioning strategies for gifted students, and twice exceptional students. She recently won the 2016 Person of SIGnificance award from the National Society of Gifted Students.


 

 

251 Professional Development and Acceleration: Changing Attitudes and Practices
Poster, Social/Emotional

Acceleration, in its various forms, has had a robust history of research support as a programmatic option for gifted students. There is no guarantee, however, that educators have been exposed to the practice of acceleration. Professional development (PD) is one option for educators who want to better understand the importance of acceleration. The most important features of PD are the examination of educator attitudes around its practice, and internalization of the knowledge and skills that facilitate acceleration. This poster session will present strategies for identifying and addressing beliefs towards gifted students and acceleration and components of individualized professional learning plans.

Susannah Wood*
University of Iowa
United States

Susannah M. Wood is currently an associate professor at the University of Iowa where she teaches both doctoral students and students who are pursuing their master’s in school counseling with an emphasis in gifted education in partnership with Belin and Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talented Development. Her research interests encompass preparing school counselors for their practice with a focus on serving the gifted population in collaboration with other educators and professionals.

Laurie Croft
University of Iowa
United States

Laurie Croft is a clinical associate professor at the University of Iowa and is the associate director for professional development at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. Croft has made presentations at various state, national, and international conferences, and to parent groups, teachers, and school boards. She coordinates a comprehensive program of online classes that comprise an endorsement in gifted education, and she serves as the College of Education honors advisor. She is currently a US delegate to the WCGTC.


 

 

266 Professional Learning in Gifted Education: Models, Research, and Practice
Symposium, G&T

Recognized as the most important school-based factor for student learning, teacher quality is essential for gifted students. Teacher training programs around the world, however, rarely include “giftedness” or “gifted education.” While effective professional training comprises the “critical component of improving the quality of education” (Jones & Dexter, 2014, p. 368), teacher training targeting the nature and needs of gifted learners—and how to meet those needs—often has been optional or unavailable. This symposium presents exemplary models and research-based practices with applications for professional learning that meet the cognitive and affective needs of diverse gifted students.

Laurie Croft
University of Iowa
United States

Laurie Croft is a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Iowa and Associate Director for Professional Development at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. Croft has made numerous presentations at state, national, and international conferences; parent groups, teachers, and school boards. She coordinates a comprehensive program of online classes that comprise an endorsement in Gifted Education, and she serves as the College of Education Honors Advisor. Laurie is currently a United States delegate to the WCGTC.

Connie Phelps
Emporia State University
United States

Connie Phelps is Professor and Director of Gifted Education at Emporia State University where she trains gifted facilitators in grades K-12 to meet state and national standards. She directs the Great Plains Center for Gifted Studies and co-edits the Emporia State Research Studies. She serves as Past Chair of the Professional Development Network in NAGC and was an alternate delegate to WCGTC. She leads state and national accreditation reviews; presents at state, national and international conferences; serves on the Future Problem Solving Program International Board of Advisors and coordinates the Inventions component of the International Torrance Creativity Legacy Award.

Wendy Behrens
Minnesota Department of Education
United States

Wendy Behrens is the Gifted and Talented Education Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Education. She presents frequently on the nature and needs of gifted learners, instructional strategies, service design, and policies that support highly able learners. She has co-authored several books and is an invited speaker in the United States, Middle East, Far East, and Europe. She is President of the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted, a CEC-TAG Board Member, delegate to the World Council, and an advisor for the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University and the Grayson School.

Kimberley Chandler
College of William and Mary
United States

Kimberley Chandler is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Curriculum Director at the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William and Mary. She has served in various roles in gifted education and now provides professional development training for teachers and administrators. Kimberley has edited and contributed numerous curriculum materials from the Center for Gifted Education. She co-authored the book Effective Curriculum for Underserved Gifted Students and co-edited Effective Program Models for Gifted Students From Underserved Populations. Kimberley is the Network Representative on the NAGC Board of Directors and editor of the CEC-TAG newsletter, The Update.

Christine Weber
University of North Florida
United States

Christine L. Weber is an Associate Professor of Childhood Education, Literacy, and TESOL at the University of North Florida, with a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A & M University. Dr. Weber has been a member of the Editorial Review Board for Gifted Child Today since 1998. Her recent books with co-authors Cecelia Boswell and Wendy Behrens include Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners: A Case Studies Approach (2016) and Exploring Critical Issues in Gifted Education: A Case Studies Approach (2014). She also co-authored a book chapter “Gifted Students and Advanced Readers” in Ebooks for Elementary School (2015).

Dina Brulles
Arizona State University
United States

Dina Brulles, Ph.D., is the Director of Gifted Education at Paradise Valley Unified School District in Arizona also the Gifted Program Coordinator at Arizona State University. The gifted programs Dina oversees incorporate innovative uses of technology, enfranchise underrepresented populations and provide extensive professional development opportunities. Dina serves on the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Board of Directors as the school district representative. Dr. Brulles co-authored the books, Differentiated Lessons for All Learners, The Cluster Grouping Handbook: How To Challenge Gifted Students and Improve Achievement For All, Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classrooms, and Helping All Gifted Children Learn.


 

 

250 Professional Training: Developing Leaders in Gifted Education
Parallel Session, Leadership

Leadership, essential for serving gifted/talented students, often comes from teachers who understand how to meet their needs. Independent teacher learning has emerged as an option for meaningful understanding. With online materials, educators can pursue greater knowledge. Learning can be organized as a QUEST, a framework encouraging the exploration of A) Questions teachers have; B) Understandings teachers initially have (including unexplored implicit ideas); C) Emotions arising about the topic, from stakeholders; D) Standards guiding the exploration of relevant research; and E) New thoughts developed about the topic and its implementation.

Laurie Croft
University of Iowa
United States

Laurie Croft is a clinical associate professor at the University of Iowa and is the associate director for professional development at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. Croft has made presentations at various state, national, and international conferences, and to parent groups, teachers, and school boards. She coordinates a comprehensive program of online classes that comprise an endorsement in gifted education, and she serves as the College of Education honors adviser. She is currently a US delegate to the WCGTC.

Anna Payne
University of Iowa
United States

Anna Payne is a doctoral student at the University of Iowa in mathematics education, with a focus on gifted students in mathematics. At the university, she supervises mathematics student teachers, as well as working with innovative options for professional learning at the Belin-Blank Center. She has previously worked as a secondary mathematics teacher in middle and high schools in Iowa, working with gifted students at all grade levels. Anna has presented at several conferences at the local and state level on gifted education.


 

 

228 Promoting Cultural Relevance in the Secondary Classroom Through Arts Integration
Parallel Session, Programming

To help gifted adolescents feel more connected to the standards in content-area classes and to inspire greater self-efficacy and success, incorporating songs, artwork, and literature from popular culture is an important strategy. In this session, the presenters will discuss the way in which the music, art, and literature of various contemporary decades can add a depth of understanding about the American people’s experience and show how and why the social changes of each time period occurred. The session will include the introduction of graphic organizers and instructional strategies that promote higher order thinking and interdisciplinary learning through arts integration.

Kimberley Chandler
College of William and Mary
United States

Kimberley Chandler’s professional background includes teaching gifted students in a variety of settings, serving as an administrator of a school district gifted program, and providing professional development training for teachers and administrators. Kimberley has served as the editor and contributing author of numerous curriculum materials from the Center for Gifted Education. She co-authored the book Effective Curriculum for Underserved Gifted Students and is the co-editor of the book Effective Program Models for Gifted Students From Underserved Populations. Kimberley is the Network Representative on the NAGC Board of Directors and is editor of the CEC-TAG newsletter The Update..


 

 

269 Public attitudes towards the gifted: Myth and Reality
Parallel Session, Advocacy

Society’s “love-hate relationship” with giftedness has framed the discussion of gifted education for decades. Until recently, the nature of that relationship has been unclear. In 2015, the Institute for Educational Advancement began an unprecedented survey of public attitudes about giftedness. Together with a national polling organization, and in collaboration with NAGC and the Fordham Foundation, data has been gathered from a stratified random sample of American citizens on several topics, including attitudes towards the term ‘gifted’ and increased public services. The results shed light on lay attitudes, and on how to approach conversations about public policy.

Elizabeth Jones
Institute for Educational Advancement
United States

Ms. Jones has been an educator, researcher and administrator of educational programs for over 20 years. Ms. Jones served as the Associate Director of The Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth and the Director of the Western Region for ten years prior to co-founding the Institute for Educational Advancement, a nonprofit that provides support and services for gifted youth across the country, in 1998.

Dr. Shelagh Gallagher

United States

Dr. Shelagh A. Gallagher has worked with gifted students, their teachers and parents from Charlotte to Kazakhstan. She has conducted research and published articles on topics including personality attributes and giftedness, developmental and academic needs of gifted adolescents, questioning strategies for gifted students, and twice exceptional students. Dr. Gallagher served two terms on the Board of Directors of NAGC. She has received 7 curriculum awards and Article of the Year award from NAGC. She recently received the “Person of SIGnificance” award from the National Society for Gifted Students, and she is a Yunsas Fellow with the Institute for Educational Advancement.


 

 

126 Publishing your work in gifted education: Ask the Journal Editors
Symposium, Misc

What are the editors of the varied journals in gifted education looking for? As a potential author, what can you do to increase the chances that your work will be published? Current or incoming editors of five journals in gifted education will participate in this panel. Each will briefly describe the journal he or she edits and the kind of work each journal publishes. Panelists also will share their advice for authors who wish to have their work published in these peer-reviewed gifted education journals. A question and answer period with the audience will follow the formal presentation.

Jae Yup Jung
The University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr Jae Yup Jung is a Senior Lecturer, a GERRIC Senior Research Fellow and a former Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow in the School of Education at UNSW. The focus of his research is on the decision-making of gifted adolescents on topics such as careers, university entrance and friendships, usually incorporating motivational and cultural perspectives. His research has been recognised with awards from the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and Mensa International. He is the editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education and a member of the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly and the Journal of Employment Counselling.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.

Michael S Matthews
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
United States

Dr. Michael S. Matthews is Director of Academically/Intellectually Gifted graduate programs at UNC Charlotte in North Carolina, USA. He is incoming co-editor of Gifted Child Quarterly and Chair of the Research on Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent SIG of the American Educational Research Association. Dr. Matthews’ scholarship address education policy, science learning, motivation and underachievement, parenting, and related issues in gifted education. He is author or editor of five books, around 35 articles, and over a dozen book chapters. His work has been recognized with the Early Scholar Award (NAGC), the Legacy Book Award (TAGT), and the Pyryt Collaboration Award (AERA).


 

 

11 Radiant Measures: Data, Planning, and Programming across Elementary and Secondary Grades
Parallel Session, Programming

As gifted program designers may attest, there are aspects of magic at play when data, differentiation strategies and practices, student interests, and student readiness align to strengthen teaching practices, enrich the learning environment for students, and enhance the learning potential of students. In a case study conducted with elementary and secondary math and language arts educators, this session explores how gifted program designers craft a program and plan to dynamically support the unique needs of students and considers challenges faced by all educators for gifted and talented learners.

Yvonne de St. Croix

United States

Dr. de St. Croix specializes in the field of gifted and talented education. Her doctoral work was completed in Educational Leadership with an emphasis on transformational leadership. Dr. de St. Croix’s professional focus is to elevate the capabilities of students by supporting data-driven, rigorous, and relevant instruction. In her capacity as a talented and gifted educational leader in Connecticut, she enjoys developing new techniques and strategies to improve instruction and coaching and mentoring classroom teachers in their implementation. By uniting STEM and literacy, she advocates for gifted learners through focusing on experiential learning.


 

 

326 Raising the quality of gifted and talented education through interdisciplinary learning
Parallel Session, Creativity

This study aims to diagnose the current state of interdisciplinary learning in gifted education and proposed ways to raise the quality of gifted education through interdisciplinary learning. Pointing out the problem of ambiguity of interdisciplinary learning and limited use of STEAM education, attempts were made to redefine the notion of interdisciplinary learning. In-depth interview and surveys were conducted at the Science Academy for the Gifted in South Korea to analyze how faculty and students conceptualize interdisciplinary learning and how they implement it in their curriculum. This study also examined universities’ stance on interdisciplinary learning and their evaluation of curriculum of SAG.

Ju Ah Kim
Korean Educational Development Institute
South Korea

She is a research fellow at national research center for gifted and talented education at Korean Educational Research Institute(KEDI) in South Korea. She had been a principal invastigator in the government funded research projects such as “Designing the longditudinal study for the gifed(2017-2041)(2015)”, “Development of curriculum of Science and Arts Academy for the Gifted(2014)”, and “Setting standard for gifted education program in humanities(2014)”. Her main research topics are curriculum and pedagogy for the gifted, integated learning, creativtiy,and longitudinal research.

Mi Kyung Lee
Cheonnam national univerity
South Korea

She is a professor in Cheonnam national university teaching music theory to pre-serviece teachers. She was reserch fellow at national research center for gifted and talented education at Korean Educational Research Institute(KEDI)and conducted reserch project on creativity and gifted education in music. Her main reserch topics are music theory,interdisciplinary learning, creativity, and talent identification in music.

Daniel Suh
POSTEC
South Korea

He is a professor at Creative IT Engineering department of POSTEC. He teaches social innovation, organizational Structure, innovation economics, and entrepreneurial finance. He had conducted reseach project on innovation on selection criteria for freshman of POSTECH. His main reserch topics are innovation, creativity, and identification of the gifted.


 

 

89 Re-envisioning Culturally Proficient Leadership to Expand Student Success for All: Examining the Identification of Underrepresented Minority Gifted Children in Rural Colorado
Parallel Session, Identification

What factors influence the identification of racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse gifted students in rural contexts? This research is being co-constructed by practitioners, university researchers, and the State Department to increase the number of traditionally underrepresented minority gifted children in rural, remote contexts. This boundary-spanning work focuses on increasing the identification of gifted Latino and Native (indigenous) students (Oakes, 2005), along with students who live in poverty, in 17 rural and remote schools. We examine local assumptions and beliefs, as well as the leaders’ cultural proficiency, that act as barriers to the identification of all gifted learners.

Kristina Hesbol
University of Denver
United States

Kristina A. Hesbol is Assistant Professor in the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Department at the Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver. She has taught preK-graduate school, has served as a principal of three multi-lingual, multi-cultural schools, coordinated school improvement for a diverse school district, and served as a district Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Hesbol earned her Ph.D. at Loyola University (Chicago), and currently serves as a member of the Right4Rural Research Team, examining the impact of school and district leaders on the identification of culturally and linguistically diverse rural students.

Norma Hafenstein
University of Denver
United States

Dr. Hafenstein’s award-winning professional career spans numerous positions in leadership and scholarship. She is a Full Clinical Professor in the Teaching and Learning Sciences Department, founded the Ricks Center for Gifted Children, a PS-8 school on the campus, in 1984, and founded the Institute for the Development of Gifted Education in 1997. She presents extensively on giftedness at national and international conferences. Dr. Hafenstein has presented at the International Dabrowski Congress, Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted Annual Conference (SENG), World Council on Gifted and Talented Children Biennial World Conference (WCGTC), and the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA).

Justine Lopez
University of Denver
United States

Justine López, MA, is a doctoral candidate at the University of Denver. She is currently a member of the Right4Rural Research Team/Javits Grant, examining the impact of school/district leaders on the identification of underrepresented gifted students in rural areas. Teaching experience includes affiliate faculty at Regis University’s Dual Language Program; Department of Marketing, The Colorado Women’s College, Multicultural Voices of Discovery at the University of Denver; and Graphic Arts Communications instructor at the Community College of Denver. Her leadership perspectives align with 15+ years as a business owner, educating, leading, building, implementing, and guiding non-profit and for-profit business ventures.

Julia Watson-Barnett
University of Denver/ Colorado Department of Education
United States

Julia Watson, PhD, serves as the Gifted Education Regional Consultant for 19 school districts in NW Colorado and as a researcher and professor at the University of Denver. She has been an educator for 40 years, as a teacher (K-college), administrator, staff development, teacher-coach, and district facilitator. She has worked in Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, Arkansas, Nebraska, and 13 years in Hawaii. Her areas of expertise include Curriculum, Assessment, Leadership, and Gifted/Talented. She was nominated as Outstanding Educator of the Year, for Outstanding Dissertation (1997) and has been inducted into the Colorado Academy of Educators for Gifted, Talented, & Creative.


 

 

337 Re-establishing Perth Modern School as Western Australia’s only fully selective school for academically gifted students
Parallel Session, Misc

Perth Modern is WA’s only fully selective academic school. Students come from across the state and more than 120 primary schools. The first cohort commenced in 2007 and graduated in 2012 as the school transitioned from comprehensive to selective. By considering the needs of the gifted, students can achieve within a supportive environment. Students report Perth Modern provides opportunities to meet like minded peers, curriculum challenge, and opportunities beyond the classroom. The school is regularly the top school for median ATAR and students earn more awards than any other school. This presentation will focus on strategies and processes that led to this outstanding success.

Lois Joll
Department of education WA
Australia

Lois Joll is an educator with experience in senior roles in the public and private systems. At Methodist Ladies’ College, she guided students to achieve outstanding examination results. Later roles included Moderator for the Arts at the Curriculum Council and Director of Secondary Education in the Department of Education, with oversight of gifted education. In that role she proposed and led the repurposing of Perth Modern School from a comprehensive to a selective academic school. As Principal of Perth Modern for six years, Lois has ensured appropriate curriculum, co-curricula opportunities and skilled staff are in place to support student success.

Val Furphy
Department of Education WA
Australia

Val Furphy has been Vice Principal of Perth Modern School for the past 10 years. In that time she has operationalised the vision for repurposing Perth Modern to a fully selective academic school. This role has involved developing a whole school vision and approach to the curriculum and its delivery, selecting staff, ensuring appropriate professional development and ensuring parents understand the vision of the school. In 2014, Val was a recipient of a Churchill Fellowship to study approaches to gifted education in various countries to meet the academic and social and emotional needs of gifted students.


 

 

263 Reading and the Gifted: Developing a Program of Reading with a Global Perspective
Parallel Session, Programming

Many of our gifted/talented students are strong readers, but too often they receive little or no instruction in developing advanced reading skills. In their reading, they are not led into depth and complexity, key elements in reading instruction for the gifted/talented. In this session, research and theory will be transformed into classroom practices to develop an appropriate approach to reading instruction. As time allows, we will re-visit the presenter’s 1989 Sydney World Conference presentation, which focused on the paring of American children’s and young adult literature with Australian literature with new titles.

Robert (Bob) Seney
Mississippi University for Women
United States

Dr. Seney, Professor Emeritus/Gifted Studies, is actively involved in gifted education through consulting, teacher and parent workshops, and presenting at conferences. Called “the Book Guy” because of his work on gifted readers, his presentation, “What’s New in Young Adult Literature,” is a regular session at NAGC. He reads actively to create his annual Lists, shared with teachers, librarians, and parents. Publications on reading include columns for NAGC’s Teaching for High Potential and for 2e Newsletter. University service includes Director of Educational Graduate Programs, primary instructor in the Masters of Gifted Studies program and Director of the Mississippi Governor’s School.


 

 

229 Reading Fiction as Existential Inspiration for the Gifted
Parallel Session, Guidance

Gifted students often think and feel in different ways than other students. Existential philosophy can be one way that can direct gifted individuals to reach their potential. Engaging in reading literature provides rich content and context that can provide inspiration for the gifted. Gifted students have shared how reading novels helps them in making choices, finding purpose, and being responsible for their lives. This presentation provides information about how gifted students gain existential inspiration from reading fiction.

Paula Christensen
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
United States

Dr. Paula Christensen is an Associate Professor at Northwestern State University of Louisiana in Natchitoches. She teaches graduate courses at NSU in gifted education, counseling, and student affairs in higher education. She is a National Certified Counselor with a strong background in counseling with gifted children and adults and teaching middle school gifted students. Dr. Christensen has also engaged in research studies regarding the processes of gifted students reaching their potential. Her passion for reading and for gifted students has led to a wonderful blending of studying both.


 

 

366 Reading-novel Course in Gifted Children Education
Parallel Session, Programming

Students in quality classes are characterized by a high level of intelligence and strong ability to internalize new knowledge. As an English teacher, my job is to respect students’ cognitive status and assist in knowledge-construction. Knowledge acquisition can only have the best effect with interaction between strong motivation and reasonable cognition. Therefore, in terms of English teaching as a second language, reading should play the key role. However, in the current class teaching, it is still a new attempt to carry out reading activities.

Qiong Wang
Beijing No. 8 High School
China

With a master degree in English of Beijing Language and Culture University, she once was a college teacher. In 2007, she began to work in Beijing No. 8 Middle School. In 2012, she was selected to serve in the Gifted Children Education Center and appointed as the leader of the English teaching and researching group.


 

 

198 Realizing Potential: Practical Programming for the Highly Able in the 21st Century
Symposium, G&T

This symposium sets out to demonstrate, through best practice, how a multi-faceted program model for highly able students, based on researched theory and built around the specific needs of its participants, can enhance learning opportunities for students, enabling excellent achievement outcomes. The focuses on development of skills, knowledge, creative ideas, and the benefits of collaboration between like-minded peers will be explored as a varied STEM course is shared. The impacts of questioning, research, and self-discovery will be analysed as students, past and present, share what engaged best with their learning style, providing launching pads for future growth and direction.

Mark Smith
Mentone Grammar School
Australia

Mark Smith holds a M.Ed., Gifted and Talented, Monash University. Over 15 years directing programs for highly able students from Foundation to Year 12 in some of Melbourne’s leading schools, Mark is currently Head of Learning Enhancement (LE) at Mentone Grammar, where he leads a team of 15 LE staff and 25 mentors to assist students for best educational and personal outcomes. Though working with students across the school, a key focus is supporting 60 Year 12 students through Year 12 using a targeted mentoring approach. His outstanding results with these students, heavily endorse the benefits of well-established mentoring programs.

Hayley Lewkowicz

Hayley Lewkowicz began her career in education teaching music at one of Victoria, Australia’s most renowned Select-Entry-Accelerated-Learning state schools. Here she coined an interest in the education of gifted and talented students, and subsequently completed a Masters of Gifted Education at Monash University. Since 2016 Hayley has been working alongside Mark Smith at Mentone Grammar School in Melbourne running the ‘Dare 2 Dream’ Program. Hayley is passionate about all areas in this field, however has a particular interest in philosophy based programs as well as incorporating ICT into dynamic programming options for gifted students.


 

 

322 Roles of Giftedness, Gender, and Age in Overexcitabilities: Highlighting Instrument-sensitive Group Difference in Emotional Overexcitability
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This review aims at identifying roles of giftedness, gender, and age on overexcitabilities (OEs). Included studies are highly consistent in that 1) females score higher in EOE and SOE, 2) TOE is higher in older groups, and MOE probably decreases with development. Moreover, TOE has been identified as the most consistent characteristic differentiating the gifted from their counterparts. While for EOE, the selection of questionnaires (OEQ or OEQ-II) is contributing to the variation of the results, indicating that the simplification from OEQ to OEQ-II may have restricted its application in investigating the group differences between the gifted and non-gifted.

Yifan LYU
City University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Ms. LYU Yifan, Virra is currently a PhD candidate in Department of Applied Social Sciences, City University of Hong Kong. Research interests include cognition-emotion interaction, and emotional recovery profiles of groups of different cognitive ability levels.


 

 

178 Russia: State of Talents
Parallel Session, Advocacy

For the first time in decades, a national review of young talents has been conducted across Russia. It is focused on practical implications for policy-makers, existing and potential providers, and learners and their families. The logic follows a holistic process of nurturing gifted youth from needs identification, through talent development, to a multi-faceted talent application. That is, to a personal, professional, and civic fulfillment in further life, and talent retention. Recent national initiatives are raising new hopes, pushing innovations, and addressing some of the deficiencies across the ecosystem.

Andrey Barkin
Council for Gifted (Russia)
Russia

Graduated from a prime national university at the age of 18, in physics and higher mathematics; hence, understand the opportunities and challenges that gifted youth are facing, from inside. MSc and MBA degree holder; since 2007 focused on education, human capital development, incl. public service / provider / non-profit dimensions. Since 2014 running a national organization to nurture young talents, including applied research on the state of talents.


 

 

133 Scenario Performance: creating new options for demonstrating problem solving for children beyond the square
Parallel Session, Diversity

The options available to educators to develop problem solving skills in students tend to be focused on communication skills around the written word, or are based around ‘Western’ conceptualisations that are specific to certain cultures. However, the use of futuristic story telling performances enables students from cultures where oral storytelling is prized or students who have learning difficulties such as dyslexia, to develop and demonstrate their problem solving skills. This presentation outlines one such option: Scenario Performance, which is part of the global non-profit Future Problem Solving Program.

Christine Casinader
Future Problem Solving Program Australia
Australia

Since becoming involved with Future Problem Solving Australia in 1992, Christine Casinader has held many roles from coaching successful competitive teams to working on the National Committee. As a committee member she was, for many years, the national Director of Coaching. More, recently she has concentrated on developing the Scenorio Performance aspect of the program. This program began in Australia and is currently expanding into the international arena. Christine works as a History and Geography teacher at Presbyterian Ladies’ College in Melbourne, Australia specialising in integrating ‘creative thinking’ into the everyday currriculum.


 

 

214 School library user stereotypes – the students speak out! A mixed method study exploring the role of secondary school libraries in the lives of gifted students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Currently there is limited research available regarding the role that school libraries play in the lives of gifted students. This mixed-methods research provides insights into how secondary school students perceive, stereotype, and treat students considered to be the regular school library users and who often self-identify as academically gifted. The research explores and contrasts the similarities and differences in the perceptions of the regular school library users by those students who self-describe as academically gifted and those who do not identify themselves as gifted. Several potential implications of the reported peer stereotyping are discussed, including well-being and academic achievement.

Mariusz Sterna
Flinders University
Australia

Mariusz Sterna is a doctoral candidate researching the experiences and perceptions of school libraries by gifted students. He is currently working as a senior secondary Mathematics teacher and a School Library Coordinator at a large secondary college in South Australia. For a number of years Mariusz has also worked at Flinders University Central Library. As an educator, Mariusz has a strong interest in working with students from both sides of the ‘ability spectrum’ and particularly gifted students. Mariusz holds a Master of Gifted Education degree and is a member of GTCASA (Gifted and Talented Children’s Association of South Australia).


 

 

352 Self-Handicapping, Achievement Goals, and Self-Efficacy of Gifted Students
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

Some students purposefully display self-handicapping behaviors when they are expecting a low performance for a subsequent academic task. They associate their low performances to the self-handicapping behaviors to avoid a possible perception of lack of ability by their friends. The present study investigates self-efficacy, achievement goal orientation, and self-handicapping behaviors of middle school Turkish gifted students. The results of the study revealed that gifted students are not free from self-handicapping behaviors, and those who have low self-efficacy and focusing on performance goals are more likely to show self-handicapping in their school education. Possible implications of the study were discussed.

Harun Tadik*

Harun Tadik is a doctoral student and research assistant in Gifted and Creative Education program in Educational Psychology Department at University of Georgia. He got his master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction Department at University of Cincinnati, and earned his BA degree in Gifted and Talented Education Program from Istanbul University, Turkey. He is an advisee of Dr. Bonnie Cramond, and his research interests include creativity and social context, assessment of creativity, and social and emotional needs of gifted children.

Abdullah Eker
Necmettin Erbakan University
Turkey

Abdullah Eker is a doctoral student in Special Education Department specializing in Gifted and Talented Education at Necmetting Erbakan University, Turkey. He got his master’s degree in Gifted Education program at Anadolu University, and earned his BA in Gifted and Talented Education from Istanbul University, Turkey. He is interested in identification of gifted children, meta-cognition, and academic achievement of gifted children.


 

 

274 Singular and Plural: Balancing individually differentiated curriculum with cohort and group learning in gifted education
Parallel Session, Programming

An all-gifted school environment with instruction individually tailored to the needs and capabilities of each student is often envisioned as the ideal. However, we also know that students benefit tremendously from learning together, whether in discussion groups or through collaborative work. How can one school — and, indeed, each teacher within that school — balance these competing paradigms so students may benefit from both? In this session, we will share practical techniques that have proven successful in an all-gifted environment, as well as specific examples of how this delicate balance can be managed on a day-to-day basis.

Jill Williford Wurman
The Grayson School
United States

Jill Williford Wurman is Director of Research at The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. At Grayson, she acts as the in-house resource for the most current understanding on gifted education topics relevant to the school community, including academic performance, pedagogy, social-emotional development, longitudinal outcomes, and best practices in gifted education. She has spoken to the American Psychological Association’s national convention regarding summer residential programs for the gifted, and has co-presented on giftedness at MIT and at SENG’s national conference.

Melissa Bilash
The Grayson School
United States

Melissa Bilash founded The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. She serves on NAGC’s Legislative and Special Schools Committees, and with her co-founder Jennifer Nance, co-authored NAGC’s 2016 publication, A Guide to State Policies in Gifted Education (2nd ed.). One of only 78 federally-trained Special Education Advocates, she has testified before Congress and met with Senators, Representatives, and U.S. Dept. of Education staffers regarding best practices in gifted education. Ms. Bilash has been awarded Special Congressional Recognition for her work, and in 2016 was named her state’s inaugural “Innovator Award” winner at their annual conference.


 

 

163 Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted Children and the Sixth Language of Love
Parallel Session, G&T

Gifted Children are complex, highly sensitive individuals who often face daunting challenges in adjusting to life. Research indicates that it is uncomfortable and sometimes painful to be statistically different from your age peers. Gifted children can develop excellent coping strategies which can be to their advantage but often disadvantage them. This presentation looks at the social and emotional needs of gifted children. The focus is on effective communication with gifted children. The gift of giving and receiving knowledge is the sixth language of love and it is important in establishing and maintaining a meaningful connection with our gifted children.

Lynn Berresford

New Zealand

Lynn is a director of the Indigo Assessment and Counselling Centre in Auckland NZ. She has over 30 years experience of working with children, teenagers and adults with exceptional needs. She is a dedicated and skilled advocate for Giftedness. She has given many presentations and workshops and written many articles for educators and parents. She is an advisor for the New Zealand Association for Gifted Children.


 

 

328 Socio-emotional issues among gifted and talented students: Implication to guidance and counseling services
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This study aimed to identify socio-emotional issues among gifted students. One hundred ninety four students from PERMATApintar National Gifted Centre, Malaysia were randomly selected to respond to Socio-emotional Issues Instrument. Descriptive analyses are used to determine the mean score of the variables. Results showed the overall mean of gifted students’ socio-emotional issue is moderate (2.71, the sp: 7:39). Social justice (4.13) and perfectionism (3.12) were found to have a higher mean. While anxiety, procrastination, motivation, emotional, self-concept, social pressure, underachiever, and family relationships are at moderate levels. It implied the needs of guidance and counseling services for gifted and talented students.

Rorlinda Yusof
UNIVERSITI KEBANGSAAN MALAYSIA
Malaysia

Rorlinda Yusof is Associate Professor of gifted education program. In this capacity, she coordinates High School and Pre-university Gifted Program at PERMATApintar National Gifted Centre, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Her educational background consists of degrees in education Guidance and Counseling from University Kebangsaan Malaysia (Ph.D), University Malaya (M.Ed), and Central Michigan University (B.Sc. Business Administration). She has more than 25 years working experience as a high school teacher, counselor, researcher and administrator. Her psychological counseling experiences had driven her passion to understand psychological issues among gifted population. She leads numerous research projects on education, journal publication, and conference at international level.

Noriah Mohd Ishak*
University Kebangsaan Malaysia
Malaysia

Prof Dr Noriah has a collective of more than 30-years working experience as a consultant, educator, lecturer, researcher, and administrator. She started as a school teacher with the Ministry of Education before becoming an academia at the Faculty of Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. She is currently the Director of Pusat PERMATApintar™ Negara, UKM, the National Center for Gifted Education.Prof Dr Noriah holds a PhD degree in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology from Western Michigan University, USA, a Masters of Education (MEd) degree in Counseling and Guidance from UKM, and a Bachelor of Science (BSc in Mathematics) degree from Universiti Malaya.

Afifah Mohd Radzi

Affifah Radzi is a teacher at PERMATApintar NationalGifted Center, University Kebangsaan Malaysia. She hold an administration post as a Student Affairs Coordinator. She has an experiences on gifted education, teaching English subject for almost ten years.


 

 

271 Special schools for the gifted in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Egypt: past, present and future.
Parallel Session, Leadership

The study aims to evaluate the current policies practices related to gifted education in the gifted schools located in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Jordan. Second, stating a policy and guideline in gifted education based on this comparative study among the chosen countries and the benefits of modern practices in some advanced nations in gifted education. A qualitative approach will be used to evaluate some schools in three countries as case studies. The data will be collected through document analysis and semi-structured interviews with decision-makers, principals, and teachers.

Nasser Almutairi
Monash University and Saudi Arabia Cultural Mission
Australia

Nasser Almutairi is a new PhD candidate at Monash University. He has studied a master’s degree in Jordan in teaching gifted students. He was working as a teacher and trainer for talented students in Saudi Arabia before coming to Australia. Dealing with talented students inspired him to focus on the importance of existing a clear policy in order to provide qualified services to meet the needs of talented students. He has participated in some training programs in special schools for the gifted in Jordan and Saudi Arabia.


 

 

372 STEM Career Pathway through Research Mentoring Programme: The Malaysian Gifted and Talented Students Experience
Parallel Session, Programming

This presentation discusses gifted students’ experiences in developing their STEM career pathways through a research mentoring program. Four hundred and seventy-five gifted students participated in the program. A total of 441 students were able to sustain their interest in STEM and gained admission into STEM related undergraduate programs. Twenty-seven students are now pursuing a postgraduate degree in STEM related fields. Twenty-one students were interviewed through emails. Data collected show that their interest in STEM related career developed while they were working on their research proposal. The interest crystallized when their work was awarded through publication.

Noriah Mohd. Ishak
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Malaysia

Prof. Dr. Noriah is currently Director of The Malaysian Gifted Center (Pusat PERMATApintar Negara, UKM). She received her undergraduate degree in Mathematics, and then proceeded to earn her Masters and PhD. in Counselling Psychology. She was later enrolled and graduated in Certificate Course on Gifted Education from NSWU. Her research work has been on identifying and developing individual’s potentials through profiling, looking at psychological issues of gifted students and the role of counselors in helping gifted students cope with their life.

Rorlinda Yusof
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Malaysia

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Rorlinda is currently a Deputy Director of The Malaysian Gifted Centre. She received her undergraduate degree in Bussiness Administration, and then proceeded to earn her Masters and Ph.D in Counselling. Her research work has been on Emotional Intelligence of teachers and gifted students.


 

 

61 Stressful events experienced by academically high-achieving females before the onset of disordered eating
Parallel Session, Guidance

Research about gifted students has shown that they experience some different sources of stress than non-gifted students. This qualitative study investigated the types of stressful events experienced by 14 academically high-achieving females before the onset of disordered eating. The results revealed that every participant reported problems related to academic issues, yet academic stress is rarely mentioned in the literature about stress and disordered eating. Some participants also described social problems related to being perceived as different. These findings have implications for both prevention and treatment of eating disorders among academically high-achieving females.

Jennifer Krafchek
Monash University
Australia

Jennifer Krafchek is a PhD candidate at Monash University, Australia. Her research is in Gifted Education under the supervision of Dr Leonie Kronborg. Jennifer has a Masters of Education (gifted education) and worked as a high school teacher of Psychology and as a coordinator of middle-school gifted programs.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of the Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

23 Student Agency in a New Zealand Specialist Gifted Programme
Parallel Session, Programming

Motivation, and the apparent lack thereof, of gifted students is an ongoing area of interest for many in gifted education, and forms the core of many definitions and conceptualisations of giftedness internationally. In New Zealand, at present, the idea of student agency is a ‘hot topic,’ with much attention being paid to how teachers might allow or support their students to be increasingly agentic. This session will present an overview of literature around agency, discuss how agency has been built into a specialist curriculum for gifted students, and share specifically agentic strategies that have been implemented via this curriculum.

Madelaine Willcocks
New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education
New Zealand

Madelaine works for the New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education as the Regional Lead Teacher for Auckland MindPlus units and for Gifted Online. MindPlus is a one day a week specialist programme for gifted students, and Gifted Online is the online equivalent. She is passionate about gifted education and loves to fuel intellectual excitement in her students. She is currently working towards a Master of Specialist Teaching in Gifted Education through Massey University (New Zealand). Her special interests within gifted education include socio-emotional and motivational development of gifted students and how this can be best facilitated in specialist educational environments.


 

 

321 Student-Led Action Research for the Primary Grades: Growing Gifted Students into Civic Minded Inquisitive Researchers
Parallel Session, Leadership

Student-led action research can be a highly effective instructional model to develop critical thinking and leadership skills in gifted and talented students during the primary grades. Many of the student research models currently being used in schools focus on students in the intermediate grades and higher. Teachers in our full time gifted program have created a proven and successful action research approach for gifted students in grades K-2 that cultivates research, critical thinking, and leadership skills. This workshop shares an easy to implement action research model created by teachers that is specifically designed for gifted students in the primary grades.

Katherine Martin
Ridgecrest Elementary
United States

Katherine Martin is a Curriculum Specialist at Ridgecrest Elementary Center for Gifted Studies, Pinellas County Schools, Largo, Florida (USA). She holds a M.S. in School Leadership from The University of Akron and a B.S. in Human Development from Lee University. Mrs. Martin has over 15 years of diverse teaching and administrative experience in public, private, charter, and Department of Defense schools in the United States and Belgium. She has worked with ESOL, special needs, Title I, and gifted learners. Kate has previously presented at the Florida Association for the Gifted Conference and the National Association of Gifted Children Conference.

Michael Moss*

Dr. Michael Moss is the current principal at the Ridgecrest Elementary School Center for Gifted Studies in Largo, Florida. He has worked in public education as both a teacher and administrator for over 23 years. He earned his doctorate degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Florida. He has conducted research and published on the topic of teacher-driven job-embedded peer coaching as an effective approach to professional development. Dr. Moss’ current work centers around implementing student-led action research which empowers students to become real world problem solvers by developing inquiry and leadership skills.

Carmela Fowler*

Carmela Fowler is a primary teacher at Ridgecrest Elementary School Center for Gifted Studies. She holds a bachelor in Primary and Elementary Education and a Masters in Educational Leadership. During her 15 years teaching in the full time gifted program at Ridgecrest Elementary in grades spanning from first to third, she has focused on developing real world applications of learning to provide students with authentic and viable avenues to construct meaning from their learning. She has previously presented on this topic at the Florida Association for the Gifted Conference as well as the National Association for Gifted Children Conference.


 

 

122 T2i: Identification Protocol in public schools
Parallel Session, Identification

T2i identifies, through its innovative approach, students and employees with high potential in STEM / MINT strategic intelligence profile and who also show a superior capacity for innovation and perseverance. T2i meets the needs and realities of public education systems and companies: minimal budgetary and professional investment, fast access to results, and quick group testing execution. T2i readily adapts as it counterbalances ethnic, linguistic, cultural, and gender biases. It modulates to students’ socio-economic situations as well as those already clinically diagnosed. Combining the weighting of standard assessments with selected scientific predictors makes the T2i unique.

Andree Therrien
Clinique Médicale Sainte-Adele, Qc Canada
Canada

I am Andrée Therrien, a psychologist from Québec, Canada. I have evaluated almost 3000 students in the past 26 years and few hundred adults. I am specialized in ADHA and Giftedness, mostly in regard to evaluation. I have worked in different settings: correctional facilities, hospitals, youth protection, family court, schools and medical clinics. I have always taken in account the IQ of the subject when writing my recommendations, with special care for gifted persons. You will find a detailed curriculum at www.ataclinique.com


 

 

197 Talent Development Academies: Providing Access and Opportunity to Advanced Learning for Underserved Students
Parallel Session, G&T

In this presentation, authors will share data from an innovative approach to talent development, which focuses on teacher development, whole school involvement, and low income schools serving elementary age students. This project is funded by the US Jacob Javits Gifted and Talented Education Grant and offers evidence-based approaches to systematically developing student talent.

Julie Swanson
College of Charleston
United States

Julie Dingle Swanson has taught in and coordinated K – 12 gifted programs and directed federal projects focused on high poverty gifted students. A professor at the College of Charleston, she teaches in and directs Gifted and Talented Education Certificate Program. Swanson is active in gifted education leadership at state and national levels as past president of the SC NAGC Affiliate and member of the Center for Gifted Education at The College of William and Mary’s National Advisory Board. She received several state and federal grants impacting gifted students and teachers and has authored articles, book chapters and books.

Laura Brock*

Laura Brock serves as the external evaluator for the Talent Development Academy Project. In that role, she works to plan and coordinate data collection and analysis to determine the impact of the TDA project. Brock, an Associate Professor in the Teacher Education Department at the College of Charleston, has a doctorate in Educational Psychology and Applied Developmental Science from the University of Virginia. Her research interests have in common her desire to understand children’s development in context of a child x environment model. She has published research in numerous journals and has received many grant awards to conduct research.


 

 

226 Talent development, career exploration, work habits, meaning in life, and connectedness of Chinese adolescents
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

This study was conducted with 2,638 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 14.92, SD = 1.32) in Hong Kong and investigated associations among the variables of talent development, career exploration, work habits, meaning in life, and connectedness. Results demonstrated that presence of meaning in life had indirect effects on talent development, career exploration, and work habits through the mediating effects of connectedness. Implications for future research and for practical implementation of talent development and career exploration programs for adolescents are discussed, with particular reference to gifted and talented students.

Mantak Yuen
University of Hong Kong
China

Mantak Yuen is an associate professor and director of Centre for Advancement in Inclusive and Special Education, the Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong. He is also the supervisor of the Programme for Creativity and Talent Development.

Jesus Alfonso D. Datu*

Jesus Alfonso D. Datu is a PhD candidate in Educational Psychology under the Division of Learning, Development, and Diversity, the Faculty of Education.

Shui-wai Wong*

Shui-wai Wong is an assistant professor, Caritas Institute of Higher Education, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Josephine Yau*

Josephine Yau is a lecturer, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Norma C. Gysbers*

Norman C. Gysbers, Curators’ Professor Emeritus, University of Missouri, Columbia, U.S.A.


 

 

360 Talent Support Networks Ensuring Capacities and a Quality of Talent Development
Parallel Session, G&T

Regional networks of teachers, field experts (researchers), stakeholders, policy makers, psychologists, teacher trainers, and institutions stimulate activities within shared concepts and measurements implemented by the Ministry of Education. Key functions are to exchange information; to create high quality activities for children, pupils, students; to provide pedagogy training; and to create cooperation among field experts, communities, and schools in the talent support development. Examples of activities fulfilling the criteria of high quality and related both to existing school systems and emerging talent support networks will be presented: manipulations for development of math concepts (pre-school), enquiry activities (primary schoolers), and designing and leading team research STEM activities (high schoolers).

Stanislav Zelenda
National Institute for Futher Education
Czech Republic

Stanislav Zelenda works on using of ICT for education and learning in physics, science and in teacher training. He looks for systematic ways of identification and care for gifted and talented pupils interested in STEM. For last fifteen years he has been focusing on development of online methods of learning, communication, and collaboration among pupils and subject experts. In these national and international experimental-developmental-research activities he cooperates with scientists, science teachers and psychologists. He is a head of the projects Talnet – online to science since and the project a national care for gifted in the Czech Republic.


 

 

158 Talented and Gifted: Music Education for Exceptional Students
Parallel Session, Programming

Students with talents that lie outside the traditional domain of academic excellence are often even more overlooked and underserved than their intellectually advanced counterparts. In particular, students with extraordinary musical talents are often forced to seek extracurricular enrichment opportunities to reach their full potential. Beyond their value for these talented students, musical study and engagement can provide benefits for more traditional gifted students as well. This session will examine the benefits of high-quality music instruction for both musically talented and academically gifted students, including a review of the research literature and specific recommendations for practice.

Marshall Haning
University of Florida
United States

Marshall Haning is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Florida, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in choral music education, the history, philosophy, and psychology of music education, and quantitative research methods. Dr. Haning’s research interests include music curricula, music teacher preparation, and the role of performance in the music education paradigm. He has had articles published in the Journal of Music Teacher Education and Contributions to Music Education, and is a frequent presenter at state, national, and international research conferences.


 

 

353 Teach from the Heart: Meeting the Social-Emotional Needs of Diverse Gifted Learners
Poster, Social/Emotional

Gifted children possess a higher level of sensitivity in the area of social and emotional development. This heightened awareness has a direct impact on the performance and success of gifted students. Thus, it is imperative that educational professionals develop an instructional model that incorporates these internal needs into the classroom. In this session, we will analyze how brain research, psychological theory, and educational pedagogy can be combined to deliver an emotionally aware curriculum that ministers to the SEL of the intellectually gifted learner.

Vickie Crockett
TEACH Educational Consulting, LLC
United States

I am a 19-year education veteran with vast experience in diverse student populations. I have engaged in programs to innovate in the area of gifted identification and have conducted research and delivered training on the SEL learning needs of underrepresented and diverse gifted learner. My independent research and educational program introduces a new instructional framework that incorporates


 

 

78 Teacher as researcher: Empathy as the first step in designing provisions for highly able students.
Parallel Session, Misc

This presentation will share insights gathered from the early stages of an ethnographic study exploring the impact of the teacher as an anthropologist and ethnographer, using empathy, perception, and relationship to engage school communities in improved practices for high ability students. A unique feature of this study and presentation relates to the exploration of engagement in change as a result of participation in a design-thinking process. Stories from teachers, gathered during their initial engagement in the discovery stage of the design-thinking process will be shared during the presentation.

Desiree Gilbert
The Association of Independent Schools, SA
Australia

Desiree works as a Consultant at The Association of Independent Schools of South Australia. She has extensive experience in Numeracy and Mathematics. Desiree provides advice and support to schools in designing a range of professional learning opportunities to build teacher capacity. Her focus is upon curriculum development and meeting the needs of all students, including the gifted. Desiree has published two books supporting practical classroom strategies in literacy and numeracy and is currently engaged in Doctoral research in the area of pedagogical change.


 

 

149 Teachers’ perceptions of their preparedness to meet the needs of gifted and twice-exceptional learners
Parallel Session, G&T

Teachers need to feel prepared to support, engage and build rapport with their students to enable student development and optimal educational outcomes. However, relatively little is known about how well-prepared early career teachers believe themselves to be for their role in teaching gifted and twice-exceptional students. Presented are 971 early career teachers’ perceptions of their preparedness to teach students with diverse learning needs, including gifted and twice-exceptional students. The results focus specifically on where beginning teachers felt least prepared: teaching diverse abilities, supporting students with disability, and communicating sensitively with parents. Implications and recommendations are discussed.

Geraldine Townend
Griffith Institute of Educational Research
Australia

Geraldine Townend has over a decade of experience in the field of gifted education with special interest and expertise in the area of twice exceptionality. She publishes on this subject and has refereed international publications. Geraldine completed her PhD at Griffith University and is now a research fellow at the Griffith Institute of Educational Research. Her research interests focus on supporting gifted and twice-exceptional students to aspire to their potential in education, which includes the development of positive academic self-concept. Her research findings indicate that there are several sociological and psychological influences on academic self-concept including social comparison theory.


 

 

281 That was Then; This is Now: New Opportunities for Gifted/Talented African American Males
Parallel Session, Diversity

In this session, we will address the unique needs of African American males in being identified for gifted programs and serving them with the additional support needed to respond to the cultural demands, often negative, within their community. We will then project responses and approaches used to address this unique population to define processes, procedures, and concepts for an international and global perspective to assist other cultures in addressing the needs of minority cultures within their predominant cultures.

Mark Mishou
Denver Public Schools
United States

Mark Mishou, BS, BAS, ME, a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Denver, has served in gifted education for 22 years as teacher of the gifted, director of gifted programs and currently a Gifted Education Coordinator in the Denver Public Schools. In these positions, his focus is increasing identification of multicultural populations for gifted programing. His dissertation topic is teacher perceptions that limit nominations for gifted identification. He has served as the Assistant Director of the Texas Honors Program and Assistant Director of the Mississippi Governor’s School. He served on the Organizing Committee of the 2005 New Orleans World Conference.


 

 

152 The ‘cost’ of giftedness: Neoliberal governance of early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand
Parallel Session, Misc

Early childhood education within Aotearoa New Zealand is regulated to promote the mechanisms of competition. As more children enter early education through the discursive normalisation of educational ‘benefits’,more gifted children attend settings which are not economically supported to adequately extend their abilities. This presentation will draw upon Foucauldian research, problematising the role economic discourses play within the lives of gifted infants and toddlers who are participating within early childhood educational settings in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Questions surrounding the compatibility of early childhood education, gifted education, and the educational domain as a site for profit-making will be raised.

Andrea Delaune
University of Canterbury
New Zealand

Andrea Delaune is a passionate early childhood teacher who has worked in many aspects of early childhood education, from teacher to centre manager. As an educational researcher in Early Childhood Education Andrea has recently completed a Master’s Degree in Education entitled Gifted education for infants and toddlers in Aotearoa New Zealand: An insight into exemplary practice, and is currently working towards a PhD in early childhood education. Andrea is a proud wife, and mother of two young children who inspire her to be a better educator and person every day. Andrea is currently the elected Secretary of giftEDnz.


 

 

365 The Application Of The Modeling In Biology Teaching
Parallel Session, Programming

The model is used to display the complex object or process performance means, while the model building method based on research model to reveal the original form, character and essence of the scientific method. Model can help students understand the complexity of life activities, learn to study the biology of the scientific method. Based on the model of teaching as the main line through typical examples, this paper expounds the classification of biology model, from the perspective of education theory and the characteristics of students, this paper expounds the biological significance of model teaching of junior high school.

Lirong Zhang
Beijing No. 8 High School
China

I work in the education teaching for 20 years, for senior high school biology teachers. I love education career, like students, I in the center of the biological teaching emphasis falls in with happiness means to cultivate students with innovation ability. Teaching should come from life, return to life, happiness in life to promote scientific literacy, enhance creativity.


 

 

308 The Context of Cultivating Creative and Innovative Talents under the Contemporary Maker Movement: An Analysis of American Cases and Taiwan’s Experience
Poster, Creativity

Taiwan’s government has made a prolonged effort in fostering creativity in students. This research aims to conduct in-depth interviews with makers who have set up leading makerspaces in formal and informal educational systems in Taiwan, and to explore the context of these spaces which help people to develop creativity and innovation skills. Simultaneously, the researcher also analyzed the successful experiences of famous creative learning environments (e.g. the MIT Media Lab) in cultivating creative people and further learned from their ideas and operating models.

YUNG-LING CHI
National Taiwan Normal University
Taiwan

Yung-Ling Chi is a teacher and also a PhD student now. She has taught gifted students in an elementary school in Taipei, Taiwan since five years ago. Her passion in gifted and talented education is especially children’s creativity, psychology and family part, so she is trying her best in exploring the issues.


 

 

257 The Creative Spirit: Actually, not Figuratively
Symposium, Creativity

The three panel members will present their personal experiences, research, and practice; challenge existing assumptions about creativity and the creative process; and discuss how spiritual and psychological components come together in the creative process. After each panel member has made an initial presentation, we will pose two questions to the audience and the panel: (a) How can this research and these ideas be implemented by teachers, administrators, counselors, and parents/caregivers? (b) What are some challenges you might face, and how would you meet these challenges?

C. June Maker
University of Arizona
United States

C. June Maker, PhD, professor in the department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies, University of Arizona, prepares professors in special education and education of the gifted. She is an associate editor for Gifted and Talented International and the International Journal of Research in Education, and an Editorial Board member for other international journals. In 2015, she received the International Research Award from WCGTC and Doctor of Letters Degree from Western Kentucky University. Her research is on performance-based assessments and creativity development. She is a frequent keynote speaker. The website for her project, DISCOVER, is www.discover.arizona.edu, and her email is junemaker@hotmail.com.

Dorothy Sisk
Lamar University
United States

Dorothy Sisk’s professional career has spanned more than 40 years. She is the former director of the U.S. Office of Gifted and Talented in Washington D.C. and holds an endowed chair at Lamar University. She was a founding member of WCGTC and the American Creativity Association and served as President of both organizations. Dr. Sisk is author of twelve books and numerous articles that appear in the major journals of gifted education including Understanding Our Gifted, Roeper Review, Gifted and Talented International, Gifted Education International, and Tempo.

Manoj Chandra Handa
Oceans of Excellence
Australia

Dr. Manoj Chandra Handa currently serves as Principal Education Officer at the NSW Department of Education, Sydney. In 2012, Manoj was recognised as one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People” in Sydney by “the (Sydney) magazine” published by The Sydney Morning Herald. He completed his PhD thesis, “Leading Differentiated Learning for the Gifted”, in 2016 at Macquarie University, Sydney. He was recognised for “Excellence in Higher Degree Research” by the Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University. Manoj was recently selected for “The Smart Teacher Research Award 2016” by The Teachers’ Guild of New South Wales for his doctoral research.


 

 

379 The Development and Effects of A Parent Education Program for Creativity Improvement Using Art Activities and Thinking tools
Poster, Creativity

The purpose of this study was to develop a parent education program using art activities and thinking tools, and to examine the effects of the program on parents’ creativity, a creative family environment, and infants’ creative characteristics. The present program consists of 12 sessions and each session lasts 90 minutes. Participants were 72 parents. The pre-test and the post-test were performed before and after the experimental treatment. The results of the present study indicate that our program for parents had significant effects on improving the creative family environment and infants’ creative characteristics as well as parents’ creative thinking.

Sun-Hee An
HaeYum Kindergarten
South Korea

* (2017) Ph.D. Hoseo University, South Korea * (present) Director of a kindergarten

EunHyun Sung
HaeYum Kindergarten
South Korea

*(Present) President, The Korean Society for Gifted and Talented *(2014-2015) President, The Korean Association for Creativity Education *(Present) Professor, Department of early childhood education, Hoseo University * (1995) Ph.D. (Doctorat ès lettres et sciences humaines), University of Paris 5, France


 

 

259 The effect of frustration caused by difficult tasks on gifted learners’ achievements.
Poster, G&T

Gifted pupils frequently underachieve. Not having learnt how to solve problems due to a lack of confrontation with challenges is a possible reason for underachieving. This research studies how pupils’ mindsets affect their success in overcoming challenging hurdles and completing complex tasks, such as translating Latin texts. The focus of the study lies on how well pupils achieve after being faced with difficulties while translating Latin sentences into Dutch. The results of these analyses will hopefully give insights into how to determine which pupils are likely to be negatively or positively affected by a frustrating task.

Chelsea O’Brien
Universiteit van Amsterdam
Netherlands

Having completed a Masters degree in Classical Languages I started teaching Classics at a Dutch secondary school where gifted pupils are placed together in one class. I have been tutoring these special classes for five years. In 2015 I was granted a PHD grant that allows teachers to combine teaching with research. My PHD project focusses on how gifted pupils react to tasks they find difficult; what (metacognitive) strategies do and don’t they utilize and how can (teachers help) gifted pupils learn from difficult tasks?


 

 

108 The effect of two interventions on high ability underachievers in an independent school
Parallel Session, Programming

The presentation aims to report on a school-based action research project, IGNITE, studying the effects of using biographies as bibliotherapy and of differentiation techniques using the Maker Model to counter underachievement in a group of identified high ability underachievers at an independent school. The project uses the Achievement Orientation Model (Siegle & McCoach, 2005) as the framework and foundation that guides the experimentation with the two strategies chosen. IGNITE will report on the results of a group of year 7 and 9 students.

Lye Chan Long
Inaburra School
Australia

Lye Chan Long is Director of Research and Enrichment at Inaburra School with oversight of students with additional needs at both ends of the spectrum, K-12, as well as school based action research projects including a two year project into high ability underachievers in the secondary school. Lye Chan works with withdrawal groups and gifted individuals. Lye Chan is a Templeton Foundation Fellow and presented her doctoral work at the Wallace Symposium in Iowa, USA (2014).

Adrienne Erwin
Inaburra School
Australia

Adrienne Erwin is currently working with underachieving gifted students. She is also completing her Masters in Gifted Education. The most recent project is a two year research project focused on high ability underachievers in her independent K-12 school. Adrienne has completed a Masters in Education (IT) and has worked in the field for more than 20 years. Prior to being in the school environment she managed a support team for an international software company and travelled nationally and internationally to educate adults in the use of IT.


 

 

212 The effects of graphic organizers: Problem-Based Learning program on the critical and creative thinking abilities and the attitudes of the gifted
Parallel Session, Programming

This study aimed to examine whether graphic organizers, when used in PBL, is effective in improving critical and creative thinking abilities and the attitudes of gifted students. The subjects of this study were 50 gifted students. The study findings were as follows: First, this program was effective in improving creative thinking ability and personality. Second, the best group (IQ of 130 or more) is shown to be more effective than the excellent group (IQ of 125-129) in many sub-factors of the critical and creative thinking ability and personality.

ShinDong Lee
SoonChunHyang University
South Korea

ShinDong Lee is a professor of SoonChunHyang University, South Korea. Currently, he serves as the president of the Korea Association for the Gifted Education for Early Childhood, a dean of Graduate School of Education, and also a director of Gifted Education Center.

WoonJung Koh
Kangnam University
South Korea

WoonJung Koh is a professor of Kangnam University, South Korea. Currently, she serves as a member of the Korea Association for the Gifted Education for Early Childhood and a vicedirector of Gifted Education Center.

SoYoung Joo
SoonChunHyang University
South Korea

SoYoug Joo is an instructor of SoonChunHyang University, South Korea. She serves as a member of the Korea Association for the Gifted Education for Early Childhood and a coordinator of Gifted Education Center.


 

 

138 The Frustration Inferno: Counselling gifted children experiencing chronic boredom and acute frustration
Parallel Session, Guidance

Most educators, medical practitioners, psychologists, and counsellors receive no specific training in working with gifted clients. Yet, by definition, gifted individuals are different from the norm, and practices that may work for others may not necessarily work for them. In this session a psychologist and a counsellor-in-training will discuss the effects of chronic boredom and how easily extreme frustration can masquerade and be misinterpreted as mental health issues and learning difficulties.

Fiona Smith
Gifted Minds Pty Ltd
Australia

Fiona Smith is the Director of Gifted Minds Pty Ltd. She is a registered Psychologist and has a Masters Degree of Education, majoring in gifted education. Over the last eighteen years Fiona has assessed over 3000 gifted children, adolescents and adults. Fiona assesses gifted individuals all over Australia and has also done assessments in China and Hong Kong. She frequently talks to parent groups and teachers and has spoken about gifted children at State, National and International conferences since 1998. Fiona has a special interest in the needs of highly gifted children and the identification of creative-divergent (invisible) gifted children.

Dominic Westbrook
ACAP
Australia

Dominic Westbrook has a BA majoring in Sociology and English and is mid-way through his Graduate Diploma of Counselling at ACAP (Australian College of Applied Psychology). He has worked for many years as an aide in his mother Fiona’s practice, Gifted Minds. Dominic wants to specialise in counselling gifted individuals who are experiencing issues with boredom and frustration and who wish to understand more about the impact these have on their profiles of intensity and sensitivity.


 

 

49 The Gifted Rating Scale for the Marginalized (GRSM)
Parallel Session, Identification

The Gifted Rating Scale for the Marginalized (GRSM) was developed to identify gifted students from low-income families, providing rubrics for Likert scales. This study reports research findings on the validity and the reliability of the GRSM as well as its technical backgrounds. It is composed of 3 factors measuring cognitive ability, creativity, and practical problem-solving ability. Participants were 100 gifted and 67 non-gifted students (grades 2 and 3) from low-income families and 18 teachers. The results showed the efficiency of the GRSM in identifying low-income gifted students better than the most commonly used teacher referral checklist.

Kyung-Sook Lee
Soonchunhyang University
South Korea

Former researcher at the NRCGTE(National Research Center of Gifted Education) of the KEDI(Korean Education Development Institute)

Shin-Dong Lee
Soonchunhyang University
South Korea

Director of the SECI Exceptional Children Institute

Jinho, H. Kim
Soonchunhyang University
South Korea

Director of the Center for children with Development Delays or Disabilities

Sang-Hee Lee
Soonchunhyang University
South Korea

Director of the Language and Auditory Clinical Training Center


 

 

125 The IB’s Middle Years Program – A good fit for gifted learners in Qatar?
Parallel Session, Programming

The International Baccalaureate’s (IB’s) Middle Years Program (MYP) was investigated to determine how well it is suited to gifted science students in the State of Qatar. Qatar’s formalized educational system is less than 100 years old whereas its culture is steeped in ancient traditions and values. To be successful, a modern curricular framework must complement rather than oppose such values. A study was undertaken to explore giftedness in this context, and whether the MYP could support these students’ academic growth. Although the framework was found to be compatible, limiting factors at the study sites impacted levels of student satisfaction.

Jeffrey MacRaild
American School of Doha
Qatar

Jeff is an experienced Primary Homeroom and Secondary Science teacher. He was formerly the Differentiation Coordinator for a Secondary school in Qatar, whilst completing his Masters degree in Gifted and Talented Education. This provided an excellent research context to explore whether that school’s curricular program was suited to the cultural context of Qatar and academic needs of its students. This then became the focus of his Master’s Degree dissertation. He currently enjoys teaching lower primary children in a different international school in Qatar, and is the delegate for the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children in that state.


 

 

52 The importance of culture in defining and accommodating giftedness: A Lebanese perspective
Parallel Session, G&T

This paper outlines part of a PhD study conducted to investigate how giftedness is perceived and provided for in a Lebanese context. Lebanon has experienced social and political turbulence over an extended period of time; however, as a country, it places a high value on education. Through a mixed methods case study, 281 primary teachers from Lebanon were surveyed about their perceptions of giftedness and educational provisions, with 12 involved in interviews and classroom observations. Findings indicated a generally positive attitude by teachers but also an acknowledgement of a limited awareness of evidence-based Western practices associated with gifted education.

Maya Antoun
University of Balamand
Lebanon

Dr. Maya Antoun joined the University of Balamand (Lebanon), as an Assistant Professor upon completing her PhD at Monash University in 2016. Her doctoral thesis investigated perceptions of Lebanese primary school teachers about the nature and needs of gifted students. Underpinned by Gagne’s DMTG model, she also examined the implementation of specialised approaches for these students within Lebanese schools, resulting in a contextually appropriate reconceptualization of the model. Maya is currently teaching a number of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in education. Her teaching and research interests are in the field of gifted education, inclusion, teacher education and classroom management.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of the Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of GiftedEducation

Margaret Plunkett
Federation University
Australia

Associate Professor Margaret Plunkett is the Associate Dean (Learning and Teaching) for the Faculty of Education and Arts at Federation University, Australia. Margaret has developed and taught courses in gifted education for which she has won a number of teaching awards including the Pearson/ATEA Teacher Educator of the Year (2012) and an Office of Learning and Teaching Citation (2014). Her main research interests include professional learning for teachers, engagement of gifted students and curriculum innovation. Margaret is an Australian Delegate on the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children and Associate Editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

348 The Investigation of Metacognitive Levels of Elementary Teachers
Parallel Session, Programming

The metacognitive skills of elementary teachers who will provide training to gifted students should be developed. The aim is this study to measure the metacognitive beliefs of elementary school teachers. In the study, Personal Information Form which is prepared by the researchers and metacognitive scale were applied. Classroom teachers in the study (N = 80) for metacognitive levels for gifted children education, the task done grade levels, years of service in the profession, gender, education level, number of students they lead to related institutions were examined with the difference analysis according to the gifted report, the students number is variable.

Çiğdem Nilüfer Umar
OKAN UNIVERSITY
Turkey

Assist. Prof. Dr. Çiğdem Nilüfer UMAR currently employed as an Assistant Professor Dr. at Okan University, Faculty of Education, Department of Special Education Program. She is specifically interested in gifted education, creativity, curriculum evaluation.

Gülşah Batdal Karaduman*

Assist. Prof. Dr. Gülşah BATDAL KARADUMAN currently employed as an Assistant Professor Dr. at Istanbul University, Hasan Ali Yücel Faculty of Education, Department of Elemantary Mathematics Education and Special Education Program. She is specifically interested in gifted education, creativity, creativity in mathematics, approaches and techniques of teaching, curriculum evaluation, individual differences in learning, the teaching of mathematics, learning of mathematics, creative drama, and spatial intelligence.


 

 

12 The Making of a Modern Day Renaissance Man (The unique case of Jozef Erece)
Parallel Session, Parenting

Jozef Erece is a Renaissance man: a lawyer, an author, a third-degree black belt, an orchestra violinist, a world class basketball player, a chess player and an entrepreneur, all at the age of 18. This presentation will focus on specific insights into special developmental milestones and parental strategies made in reaction to these milestones. It also attempts to describe the excellent collaborative work done in this special case to stimulate, nurture, and develop gifts and talents in an extreme case of accelerated learning from a parental viewpoint.

Maynard Erece
St. Augustine’s College
Australia

Maynard Erece is an educator who has a passion for Gifted and Talented Education. He has taught in the Philippines, New Zealand and Australia. These differences in educational systems enabled him to enrich his pedagogy of teaching and learning. His passion for Gifted and Talented is not just on a professional but on a personal level being a father to a very unique case of Gifted and Talented.


 

 

151 The Relationships between Achievement Factors and Creativity: Why They Are Different and How They Can Be Explained
Parallel Session, Creativity

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between academic achievement factors and creativity. This study compares how academic achievement factors predict creativity differently according to different forms of creative outcomes and gender. Participants were 295 college students in Korea. Measures of academic achievement factors included higher-order thinking, metacognition, self-efficacy, and self-determination as predictors of different creative outcomes (divergent thinking, creative problem-solving, and creative personality). Results showed that higher-order thinking and gender significantly predicted divergent thinking. In contrast, higher-order thinking and metacognition significantly predicted creative problem-solving. For creative personality, high-order thinking and self-efficacy were significant predictors.

Donggun An
Seoul National University
South Korea

Donggun An earned her Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Georgia. She is currently a researcher in Education Research Institute at Seoul National University in Korea. She was a post-doctoral researcher in the Center for Learning Science and Creative Talent Development at Seoul National University. She is recipient of the Owen Scott Scholars Award from the University of Georgia and an American Association of University Women Fellowship.


 

 

142 The seven challenges of the gifted child
Parallel Session, Programming

Being gifted is not, as some would say, just a gift or even a luxury problem. It comes with challenges, intellectually as well as socially. But what are those challenges and how to deal with them as a parent or educator? This workshop is about the seven main challenges as defined by thousands of teachers and parents. A Dutch bestseller, this book is now being published in English and its author will share the key insights, among them the question of how to overcome a fixed mindset and how to gain motivation for school.

Femke Hovinga
Take on Talents
Netherlands

Femke Hovinga had her goal clear since she was a first grader. She was struggling to be her gifted self in school and decided to make the school environment better. Grown-up and eventually graduated university, Femke founded Talentissimo, the European Platform for the Extremely and Profoundly gifted. She also is co-founder of Take on Talents, an international effort to guide parents of gifted children. Besides that, Femke is involved in several local efforts in giftedness in the Netherlands.

Tijl Koenderink
Take on Talents
Netherlands

Tijl Koenderink is an educational author and entrepreneur from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is driven by his own experiences as a child: tremendously bad school results despite an IQ-test score of over 150. To make life better for the young people who are in school now, Tijl started several companies, trained over 500 public schools, set up over 20 full-time gifted programs and created a drop-out center for gifted teenagers. To practice what he preaches, he started his own public school. Tijl is also publishing a book called ‘The 7 challenges of the gifted child’ in the US, mid 2017.


 

 

88 The state of gifted education in Australia: A SWOT analysis
Parallel Session, G&T

This presentation will commence with an overview of the current state of gifted education in Australia, as informed by a review of the Australian research in gifted education, along with gifted education policies and practices noted in non-research outlets. Thereafter, the findings of a SWOT analysis (i.e., a tool commonly used in the field of corporate management to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of businesses and industries; Helms & Nixon, 2010) on the field of gifted education in Australia, will be reported. Implications for Australia and other countries and recommendations for future research and practice will be discussed.

Jae Yup Jung
The University of New South Wales
Australia

Dr Jae Yup Jung is a Senior Lecturer, a GERRIC Senior Research Fellow and a former Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow in the School of Education at UNSW. The focus of his research is on the decision-making of gifted adolescents on topics such as careers, university entrance and friendships. His research has been recognised with awards from the American Educational Research Association and Mensa International. He is the editor of the Australasian Journal of Gifted Education and a member of the editorial boards of Gifted Child Quarterly and the Journal of Employment Counselling. Formerly, he worked as a Chartered Accountant.


 

 

276 The State of Gifted Education in the U.S.: Patchwork, Problematic…and Promising
Parallel Session, Advocacy

America’s consistently low scores on international tests and dramatic changes in the White House make understanding U.S. education policy more complex — and more important — than ever. With its “patchwork” of policies from state to state, the educational landscape for high-ability children can be perplexing, compounded by the ever-present disparity between scholarship and what actually happens “on the ground” in classrooms. In this session, we will offer a snapshot of gifted education in America today, focusing on nationwide policy variations, the gap between research and practice, and recent developments in the field that offer glimpses of a brighter future.

Jenny Nance*
The Grayson School
United States

Jenny Nance, J.D., is Founding Co-Director of The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners, where she is also Admissions Director. Recently, she co-authored NAGC’s 2016 publication, A Guide to State Policies in Gifted Education (2nd ed.). She has also participated in Congressional hearings, including testimony in support of the TALENT Act and reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Ms. Nance has presented nationally on the topic of gifted education, most recently at the annual conferences of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG).

Melissa Bilash
The Grayson School
United States

Melissa Bilash founded The Grayson School, Pennsylvania’s only independent school designed specifically for gifted learners. She serves on NAGC’s Legislative and Special Schools Committees, and with her co-founder Jennifer Nance, co-authored NAGC’s 2016 publication, A Guide to State Policies in Gifted Education (2nd ed.). One of only 78 federally-trained Special Education Advocates, she has testified before Congress and met with Senators, Representatives, and U.S. Dept. of Education staffers regarding best practices in gifted education. Ms. Bilash has been awarded Special Congressional Recognition for her work, and in 2016 was named her state’s inaugural “Innovator Award” winner at their annual conference.

Wendy Behrens
Minnesota Department of Education

Wendy Behrens is the Gifted and Talented Education Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Education. She presents frequently on the nature and needs of gifted learners, instructional strategies, service design, and policies that support highly able learners. She has co-authored several books and is an invited speaker in the United States, Middle East, Far East, and Europe. She is President of the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted, a CEC-TAG Board Member, delegate to the World Council, and an advisor for the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University and the Grayson School.


 

 

225 The Trials and Tribulations of Establishing Australia’s First Fulltime School for Gifted Children
Parallel Session, Misc

From dream to reality, what regulations and policies support or impede the establishment of a gifted school in Australia? The dream began with a diverse group of people in Adelaide in 2013. Their hard work to date has culminated in the opening of Dara School for gifted children in 2017. Dara is an independent, secular, and coeducational school located in Adelaide. Its child-centred philosophy is designed to nurture the intellectual, social, and emotional development of gifted children. Each child at Dara has a Personalized Education Plan, and the Australian Curriculum supports flexible grouping to accommodate their asynchronous development.

Lynda Simons
Dara School for Gifted Children
Australia

Lynda Simons is a doctoral candidate in Gifted Education at Flinders University, South Australia. She also holds a Master’s degree in Gifted Education. Lynda’s main areas of passion are Chemistry and Psychology. She is a past president of the Gifted and Talented Children’s Association of South Australia (GTCASA) and has done numerous presentations for teachers and parents on their behalf. Lynda is the inaugural principal of the newly established gifted school in Adelaide. She has also been a leader in the Professional Development of teachers in schools. She has been an assistant principal of a gifted program in a school.

Christine Grzesik
Flinders University
Australia

Chris Grzesik is a doctoral candidate in Gifted Education at Flinders University, South Australia. She also holds a Master’s degree in Gifted Education. Chris’ main areas of passion are Mathematics, Philosophy and Creativity. She is a committee member of the Gifted and Talented Children’s Association of South Australia (GTCASA) and has presented to teachers and also parents on their behalf. Chris was also a member of the Board of Governance for the newly established gifted school in Adelaide. She has taught Mathematics and also been a Gifted and Talented Coordinator in New South Wales and South Australia.


 

 

286 The Unique Barometers of Giftedness Through the Eyes of the Highly & Profoundly Gifted
Parallel Session, Misc

Innate, Multi-Dimensional, Dynamic Awareness – Giftedness embodies the whole self and can be discerned in all areas of development. This session examines the social, emotional, physical, cognitive, and altruistic development of giftedness and the unique barometers particularly evident, but sometimes hidden, in the highly and profoundly gifted. Key areas of discussion include Dabrowski’s over-excitabilities, misdiagnosis, and advocacy for the gifted child. Participants will walk away with a better understanding of the intrinsic characteristics, behaviors, and sensitivities of giftedness and the acute awareness, intensities, and motivations propelling profound giftedness.

Vanessa R. Wood
The International Gifted Consortium, Research Center for the Highly & Profoundly Gifted
United States

Vanessa R. Wood, M.A., Co-Founder, The International Gifted Consortium (IGC), Research Center for the Highly & Profoundly Gifted. Vanessa earned a masters in gifted education while homeschooling and created programs at the Challenge Learning Center and the Chicago Botanic Gardens to fit the social, emotional, physical, cognitive and altruistic needs of HG/PG learners. Vanessa has held volunteer positions with PG Retreat, NAGC and AAGT.

Miraca Gross
University of New South Wales
Australia

Professor Miraca Gross is Emeritus Professor of Gifted Education in UNSW’s School of Education as well as Director of GERRIC. She is recognised nationally and internationally as a leading authority on the education of gifted and talented students.

She began her career as a teacher and has 22 years’ experience as a classroom teacher and school administrator in State education systems in Scotland and Australia. For 12 years, she was a specialist teacher of gifted and talented children in several different classroom settings, including the regular classroom, cluster grouped classes, pullout programs, and full-time classes.


 

 

48 The Use of Arduinos in STEM Education – A Hands-on Approach
Parallel Session, Programming

A new Design and Technology curriculum was designed to introduce 13-year-old high ability girls to basic concepts of coding and micro-controller technology through the use of Arduinos. At the same time, students were taught to solve problems using the Design Thinking approach (Brown, 2008). Students applied what had they learned to solve authentic problems faced in the school canteen, designing and prototyping solutions that were responsive to the context and needs of the user. Findings based on a student perception survey, and student works, student reflections on learning, as well as teacher observations, will be shared and discussed.

Hui Leng Tan
Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary)
Singapore

Hui Leng has been an educator since 1997 and is currently a Senior Teacher with the Centre for Pedagogical Research & Learning at Raffles Girls’ School, a secondary for gifted and talented girls. A Design and Technology teacher with more than a decade of experience with high ability learners, she has just taken her first tentative steps to introduce micro-controller technology and 3D printing to her students formally in the Lower Secondary Design and Technology curriculum.

Puay Hong Yeo
Raffles Girls’ School (Secondary)
Singapore

Puay Hong has been an educator since 2005 and is currently teaching Design and Technology (D&T) in Raffles Girls’ School. Prior to this, he had taught Design Thinking at Raffles Institution, a secondary school for gifted and talented boys. He has extensive experience in using Design Thinking tools and strategies, coupled with maker technologies such as Arduino and 3D printers in his lessons to enable high ability students to innovate user-centered solutions for the past 4 years.


 

 

185 Theory into Practice at a P-12 Girls’ School+
Parallel Session, G&T

How do you structure a gifted and talented program to reflect your school community’s values along with best practice? A dedicated gifted education setting within a P-12 college has over the past twenty years seen the evolution of a framework incorporating six strands of practice: Professional Reading and Professional Development, Case Management, Chance Opportunities, Subject Specific Withdrawal, Voluntary and Interdisciplinary Projects, and Acceleration. This presentation will outline each of these strands, focusing on representative case studies to show how they work in practice.

Kathy Harrison
Methodist Ladies College
Australia

With a background in Science, Electrical Engineering and Youth Work, Kathy discovered a passion for encouraging gifted learners early in her 30 year teaching career. She has specialised in gifted education for twenty years; twelve spent leading the gifted education team at MLC. Her Masters research focused on using ICT with gifted learners; this continues with a focus on STEM. Kathy has provided professional development to schools, mentored other gifted education practitioners, been a Resident Scientist in School, worked with families, and established gifted programs in schools. Passionate about social justice, she volunteers through her church on projects in Vanuatu.

Jo Ryan*

Jo is an Australian teacher with over 30 years of experience in P to 12 schools. Since 2004, she has worked in an independent Melbourne girls’ school as a teacher of gifted and talented children. Focused on the specific learning needs of highly able students, Jo has continually used action research to reflect and refine practice. In 2012, Jo gained Exemplary Teacher classification at her school and provides advice for her colleagues. Jo believes passionately in high quality education and best practice but, above all, Jo is a passionate mother, embracing everything family oriented.

Kate Lafferty
Methodist Ladies College
Australia

Kate is currently teaching in the Compass Centre, an enrichment program for highly able students, at Methodist Ladies College in Melbourne’s east. With almost twenty years of teaching experience, the last seven have been dedicated to establishing and implementing a respected and valued gifted and talented withdrawal program in a Victorian government primary school. Kate is completing her PhD at Monash University, focusing on the talent development of gifted girls, and is passionate about Gifted Education. Kate has presented sessions on Gifted Education to teachers and parents, as well as providing mentoring to both schools and students.


 

 

234 Thriving or surviving: Gifted students reflect on their senior high school experiences with high-stakes assessment
Parallel Session, Social/Emotional

What comes to mind when gifted students reflect on their final school years, and their school journey in general? How do students manage a major high-stakes assessment scheme that may determine their entry to further study and possible careers? This presentation will discuss the findings of a study that interviewed a cohort of gifted students about their school experiences with high-stakes assessment after they had gone to the next step in their lives. The participants reflected on feelings of pressure, workload, procrastination, underachievement, boredom, lack of challenge, and the forced-choice between achieving their potential or living a normal teenage life.

Ben North
New South Wales Department of Education
Australia

Dr Ben North is a NSW Department of Education consultant in gifted education, and is a Head Teacher on secondment to the Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation in Sydney. He has a PhD and Master of Education in Gifted Education and is a recipient of a NSW Director-General’s Teaching Award in Excellence in Teaching and Service to Public Education, and the Sydney Region Teaching Excellence Award. His PhD explored gifted student experiences with and responses to high-stakes assessment . He is regularly a GERRIC guest lecturer in undergraduate and postgraduate gifted education courses at UNSW, Australia.

Susen Smith
UNSW Australia
Australia

See seperate bio (from Susen’s submission)

Miraca Gross
UNSW Australia
Australia

Professor Miraca Gross is Emeritus Professor of Gifted Education in UNSW’s School of Education as well as Director of GERRIC. She is recognised nationally and internationally as a leading authority on the education of gifted and talented students.

She began her career as a teacher and has 22 years’ experience as a classroom teacher and school administrator in State education systems in Scotland and Australia. For 12 years, she was a specialist teacher of gifted and talented children in several different classroom settings, including the regular classroom, cluster grouped classes, pullout programs, and full-time classes.


 

 

134 To “reach your potential” – should that really be the question? Re-thinking ideas around underachievement.
Parallel Session, Diversity

Policy documents at both a national level in Aotearoa New Zealand and at the school level frequently include aims around the idea of ‘reaching potential’ when referring to achievement for gifted learners. Notions of potential were the focus of a recent doctoral study which explored the experiences of school for 11 gifted and talented adolescents in New Zealand. Findings from the study showed that the participants saw ‘potential’ as a nebulous, inexact concept. This presentation will argue that it is not theoretically sound to structure definitions of underachievement for gifted learners around the idea of ‘not reaching your potential.’

Louise Tapper
giftEDnz The Professional Association for Gifted Education
New Zealand

Louise has been a long time educator in the field of gifted education. She has worked as a teacher educator and a parent educator. She has taught in various courses in gifted education, and around the experiences of parenting gifted children. She is the current Chair of giftEDnz, The Professional Association for Gifted Education. Louise completed her doctorate looking at the experiences of school for gifted and talented adolescents in Aotearoa New Zealand. She works as an independent researcher and as a contracted researcher for The Collaborative for Research and Training in Youth Health and Development, in youth related projects.


 

 

188 To Accelerate or Not: Negotiating the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum with Mathematically Able Adolescent Females
Parallel Session, School Alternatives

This research examined mathematically able female adolescents’ perceptions of their accelerated mathematics programs. This qualitative research had eight female participants reflect retrospectively in response to a self-administered questionnaire on their perceptions and experiences of a secondary accelerated mathematics program and their engagement in the Australian Victorian Certificate of Education subject Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 as accelerated Year 11 students. The qualitative findings revealed that the female participants had a positive recollection of their accelerated mathematics. It is proposed that this Australian data provides support to the educational practice of accelerating mathematical learning for highly mathematically able adolescents.

Julie Bartley – Buntz
Monash University
Australia

Julie Bartley – Buntz is currently a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Monash University, Victoria, Australia after recently completing her Master of Education (specialising in Gifted Education). Julie has been a secondary mathematics teacher for many years, most recently being the Head of Mathematics at a leading independent coeducational college. Julie has a strong interest in the education of females particularly in encouraging them to strive to develop their mathematical knowledge and venture into the STEM fields.

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

Dr. Leonie Kronborg, Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of Postgraduate Studies in Gifted Education at the Faculty of Education, Monash University teaches gifted education at pre-service and post graduate level, and supervises PhD students with research interests in gifted education and talent development. She is a past president of the Australian Association for the Education of Gifted Children and elected Executive Member of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children, 2013-2017. She gained the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence in 2013; is Co-Editor of Gifted and Talented International journal and on the Editorial Board of Australasian Journal of Gifted Education.


 

 

219 Top-performing math students’ achievement and achievement motivation around the world: A meta-analysis
Parallel Session, G&T

We meta-analyzed gender differences in achievement and achievement motivation among 15-year-old students scoring in the top 5% in mathematics in their respective countries, using representative international samples (80 countries, N = 175,835, 41% female). Boys slightly outperformed girls in mathematics (dMedian = 0.15), whereas girls had better reading skills (dMedian = –0.61). Gender differences in science were negligible (dMedian = 0.01). Boys demonstrated a distinct mathematics-oriented achievement profile, whereas girls’ profiles were more balanced across achievement domains. Girls held more positive attitudes towards reading. This multipotentiality of top-performing female math students may offer them wider choices of future careers.

Lena Kristina Keller
Free University of Berlin
Germany

Since October 2015, Lena Kristina Keller is a doctoral student at the Free University of Berlin and fellow at the International Max Planck Research School on the Life Course (LIFE). In her dissertation, she investigates students’ achievement and achievement motivation profiles with regard to gender differences among mathematically top performers, functional relations, and life outcomes. She received her Master’s degree in psychology from the University of Trier in July 2015. Her main research interests are cognitive and non-cognitive educational outcomes.

Franzis Preckel*

Franzis Preckel is full professor of Giftedness Research and Education at the University of Trier since 2006. She received her diploma in psychology and her doctorate from the Westfaelische-Wilhelms-University, Muenster. From 2003-2006 she was assistant professor and head of the Counceling Center for the Gifted and Talented at Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich. Her main research interests are intelligence, giftedness, factors influencing talent development, and psychological assessment. She published her research in more than 200 papers, chapters, books, conference presentations and in highly ranked refereed journals (AERJ, Intelligence, JPSP). She is on the editorial board of Diagnostica and Gifted and Talented International.

Jacquelynne Sue Eccles*

Jacquelynne S. Eccles is the Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of California, Irvine and formerly the McKeachie/Pintrich Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and Education at the University of Michigan, as well as Senior Research Scientist and Director of the Gender and Achievement Research Program at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Professor Eccles has conducted research on a wide variety of topics including gender-role socialization, teacher expectancies, classroom influences on student motivation, and social development in the family and school context. She has made seminal contributions to the study of achievement-related decisions and development.

Martin Brunner*

Martin Brunner is full professor of Evaluation and Quality Management in Education at the Free University of Berlin since 2012. He received his diploma in psychology from the University of Mannheim and his PhD from the Humboldt University of Berlin. Martin Brunner was at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin as a doctoral student and post-doc. From 2006-2012 he was post-doc and associate professor at the research unit Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science at the University of Luxembourg. His main research interests are quantitative methods, educational assessment, teacher education, and cognitive and non-cognitive educational outcomes.


 

 

75 Tournament of Minds – a six week challenge or a lifetime of valuable skills?
Poster, Creativity

Tournament of Minds (TOM) is an Asian-Pacific Competition that has been operating since 1987. This year it had over 40,000 participants from Australia and internationally. It teaches 21st century skills and, importantly, it is fun! This session outlines how creativity is developed. Receive challenges and hear results of a qualitative study where past competitors reflect on their experience. Now in their twenties, they discuss the impact the skills and attitudes they gained from TOM have had on their post-secondary lives. This small-scale research will throw light on an educational experience from the students’ perspective. Be inspired!

Tanya Atherton
Sacred Heart College
Australia

Tanya has facilitated gifted programmes K-12 for 25 years. West Australian Exemplary Teacher, WA Director Tournament of Minds, she has completed COGE at UNSW, a Masters’ Degree majoring in Gifted Education from Murdoch University and in 2012 was the recipient of the ASG National Excellence in Teaching Award. Tanya has presented at State and National Conferences and was awarded a Living the Vision Award from the Catholic Education Office in WA in recognition of her commitment, passion and service to Gifted Education. “Find a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life”. (Confucius)


 

 

110 Twice-exceptionality – opportunities and possibilities: Three mixed-methods research studies
Parallel Session, 2e

Three researchers present their inter-related studies as a three-tiered foundation for future expansion and replication. The first study, a cross-university research project, reports on a national survey investigating teachers’ understandings and confidence in identification of twice-exceptional students (2e). The second study reports on the development of a model for early identification of 2e children within the early childhood context. The third study reports on the development and testing of an initial identification questionnaire for primary school teachers and a comparison of findings with other assessment strategies. These mixed methods studies offer new insights and promising findings for teachers and students.

Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell
University of New England
Australia

Dr Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell (University of New England) is a researcher, supervisor of Higher Degree Research students and lectures in gifted and talented education with undergraduate and postgraduate students. Mrs MaryAnne Haines (Doctoral candidate) and Mrs Anne O’Donnell-Ostini (Research Masters candidate) are currently researching models and tools for identification of twice-exceptional students within primary and pre-school contexts. Associate researchers with these projects include Professor Jeff Bailey, Associate Professor Linley Cornish and Dr. Brenda Wolodko who specialise in statistics, gifted and inclusive education, and Dr. Catherine Wormald researcher, supervisor and lecturer in gifted and talented education at the University of Wollongong.


 

 

7 Understanding Educators Perceptions and Practices Regarding Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Learners
Parallel Session, G&T

Culturally and linguistically diverse students are being denied access to gifted programming in the United States at an alarming rate. While there are many factors that influence student participation in gifted programming, none are as influential as the perceptions and corresponding practices of the educators with whom these students work. This session will share the results and recommendations of an exploratory case study that sought to understand the perceptions and practices of educators at a school in a large urban district.

Robin Greene
Denver Public Schools
United States

Robin Greene is completing Doctorate of Education from the University of Denver in Curriculum and Instruction with a specialization in Gifted Education. She earned her Masters degree in Administration from Texas Christian University and her Bachelors from the University of Texas-Arlington. She is currently the Gifted and Talented Academic Program Manager of the largest school district in Colorado and has been a classroom teacher, gifted and talented teacher, curriculum coordinator, and GT Coordinator.


 

 

334 Undertaking pedagogical change in an academically selective high school: the beginning of a journey.
Parallel Session, Programming

This session shares the first stages of a journey of pedagogical change in a NSW Selective Secondary School and highlights the importance of leadership and vision in this ongoing process. The planning and delivery of professional learning processes, the development of differentiated curriculum, and the importance of faculty action research projects and summative and formative evaluation strategies will be discussed.

Mark Long
Penrith High School
Australia

Mark Long, (M. Ed (Lead), B.Ed, B.PE), is the Principal of Penrith Selective High School, a public, academically selective high school for highly gifted students located in greater western Sydney. Prior to accepting the position at Penrith, he had been the Deputy Principal at James Ruse Agricultural High School and before that, the Deputy Principal at Elizabeth Macarthur High School. Mark’s career has included teaching experiences in both the Public and Independent sectors in Australia, as well as in the USA. Mark completed his Masters of Educational Leadership at UNSW.

Bronwyn MacLeod
Gateways Education
Australia

Bronwyn MacLeod has postgraduate qualifications in Gifted Education from UNSW, is the author of five texts on curriculum differentiation and gifted education, and the author of Module 5 of the Australian Government’s Gifted and Talented Teaching Package. She has facilitated and published action research projects for schooling systems throughout Australasia and was the Convenor of the Postgraduate Certificate of Gifted Education and Gifted Education courses at UNSW for over six years. Bronwyn has taught mixed ability and self-contained gifted classes from K – 12 in government and independent schools and currently works with schools throughout Australia, Europe, Asia and Africa.

Ruth Phillips
University of Wollongong
Australia

Ruth Phillips is an educator with qualifications in Education, Psychology and is at the penultimate stage of her doctorate at the University of Wollongong with a focus on gifted underachievement. Ruth is a practicing teacher and has taught gifted students from pre-school to year 12. She is also a consultant who has worked with teachers and parents and has presented papers at International and Australian Education Conferences including the AAEGT conference in 2016 and the Wallace Research Symposium and was a co-author on the DEST Gifted Education Professional Development Package, Module 2: Identification of Gifted and Talented Students.


 

 

35 Using a Strengths -ased Approach to Support Twice Exceptional Learners in the Classroom
Parallel Session, 2e

Twice exceptional children are widely missed in the classroom due to their giftedness often masking their disability or vice versa. Using a strengths-based approach to teaching combined with a differentiated curriculum in the general classroom may not only more accurately identify twice exceptional children but help them to thrive in their schooling. This presentation will give you a box of tools to assist in both teaching and advocating for your twice exceptional children in the general classroom.

Amanda Drury

Australia

Amanda Drury has been teaching in preschools and schools for over fifteen years including ten years teaching Drama to some gifted and twice exceptional children outside of school hours. Her experience with twice exceptional children is vast, both through her work and personal life. Amanda has two twice exceptional children herself aged 8 and 11 years old and is currently studying two master’s degrees in Gifted Education and Special Education at Flinders University. She is an active member of the Gifted and Talented Children’s Association of South Australia, running a support group for parents of twice exceptional children.


 

 

299 Using conceptual frameworks, tiered inquiry and assessment to engage gifted learners in mixed ability classrooms.
Parallel Session, Programming

This session engages teachers with practical strategies to design differentiated curriculum and assessment using conceptual frameworks in order to engage the gifted learners in their classrooms in meaningful inquiry-based teaching and learning processes. Discussion on current practice, the needs or requirements of particular school and educational system priorities, and the research, which supports these processes, will be undertaken. Action research projects which examined the impact of using conceptual frameworks will be also be shared

Bronwyn MacLeod
Gateways Education
Australia

Bronwyn MacLeod has postgraduate qualifications in Gifted Education from UNSW, is the author of five texts on curriculum differentiation and gifted education, and the author of Module 5 of the Australian Government’s Gifted and Talented Teaching Package. She has facilitated and published action research projects for schooling systems throughout Australasia and was the Convenor of the Postgraduate Certificate of Gifted Education and Gifted Education courses at UNSW for over six years. Bronwyn has taught mixed ability and self-contained gifted classes from K – 12 in government and independent schools and currently works with schools throughout Australia, Europe, Asia and Africa.


 

 

40 Using rich tasks as differentiation in the elementary mathematics classroom
Parallel Session, Programming

In a mixed ability elementary mathematics classroom, providing adequate complexity and depth for the gifted students proves a teaching challenge. This presentation explores responses to one measurement and area task undertaken by students working at first grade, second grade, fifth grade, and above sixth grade in a mainstream elementary school. The richness of the task allows students to enter into authentic investigations with an increasing level of complexity and challenge appropriate to their current mathematical understanding. Programming around rich investigative tasks provides ready-made differentiation to support gifted and other learners.

Gabrielle Oslington
Macquarie University
Australia

Dr Oslington is Gifted and Talented Coordinator at an independent school in Sydney. She has responsibility for the students whose academic ability places their needs beyond the normal differentiation provided by the classroom teacher, and works with children across their primary schooling. Her students have exceptional successes in inter-school competitions, particularly in Mathematics. Dr Oslington has a particular interest in the needs of twice exceptional children, and has post-graduate training in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. To complement her teaching, Dr Oslington is currently enrolled at Macquarie University working on a doctoral dissertation on mathematical reasoning in young gifted mathematicians.


 

 

80 Using Student Feedback to Monitor and Enhance Programming Strategies for Talent Development
Parallel Session, Programming

Student voice is important in education and can be used as a tool to guide teacher practice. This concept is especially the case for the gifted, who can often provide insight about teacher practice and how it meets their personalised learning needs. This presentation will detail how qualitative and quantitative data from focus groups, surveys, and individual student and teacher questionnaires are being used in a variety of ways to influence teacher practice and to monitor and enhance classroom experiences for the gifted.

Nicole Sabbadin
Loreto Kirribilli
Australia

Nicole Sabbadin is Gifted and Talented Coordinator at an independent Catholic girls’ school in inner city Sydney, Australia. After graduating, Nicole worked in secondary schools in the United Kingdom, where her passion for gifted education was stimulated. Nicole received her Masters in Educational Psychology from the University of South Australia, and is currently studying a Masters of Education at UNSW, specialising in Gifted Education. She has published papers about target setting and reflection, and the Teaching for Understanding frameworks in MYSA, and has presented at a number of conferences within Australia on teaching English Literature, and differentiation practices for gifted.


 

 

306 Using the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2) in Identifying Gifted Students in Oman
Parallel Session, Identification

The purpose of this study was to use the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (CTONI-2) in identifying giftedness. Participants of the study constituted a national representative sample of about 1000 students selected randomly from elementary, middle, and secondary schools in Oman. The exploratory factor analysis results showed that all subtests loaded on a single factor. Also, the results showed an evidence of reliability as Cronbach’s alpha values ranged from .82 to .94 for the six subscales. The MANOVA results indicated that males outperformed females in the geometric scale while females showed more developmental progress in the pictorial scale.

Mohamed Ahmed
Sultan Qaboos University, Oman
Oman

Dr. Ahmed Mohamed’s research interests include identification of gifted students, development of enrichment programs, assessment of creativity, and early childhood. He has published several research articles in international peer-reviewed journals in different fields such as creativity, giftedness, special education, and early childhood. He is the principal investigator of a large-scale national research project funded by the Research Council in Oman (TRC) for three years (2014-2017). The purpose of this project is to develop and adapt different identification tools for gifted students and to develop enrichment curriculum units that focus on problem-solving.


 

 

73 What Role Does Reflective Thinking Play in Assessing the Understanding and Growth About Differentiation?
Parallel Session, Programming

What role does reflective thinking play as educators begin to assess their understanding and growth when adopting and implementing a philosophy for differentiating curriculum and instruction in the classroom? In this session, prompts or stems to encourage educators to question their classroom practices and whether these practices support differentiation and the goal of improving teaching will be shared. Participants will also have an opportunity to examine a rubric helpful to assess areas for growth related to differentiation such as pedagogical understanding, critical thinking, personal growth, and transformation learning.

Christine Weber
University of North Florida
United States

Christine L. Weber, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Childhood Education, Literacy, and TESOL at the University of North Florida, U.S., with a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A&M University. Dr. Weber has been a member of the Editorial Review Board for Gifted Child Today since 1998. Her recent books, with co-authors Cecelia Boswell and Wendy Behrens, include Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners: A Case Studies Approach (2016) and Exploring Critical Issues in Gifted Education: A Case Studies Approach (2014). She also co-authored a book chapter “Gifted students and advanced readers” in Ebooks for Elementary School (2015).

Wendy Behrens
Minnesota Department of Education
United States

Wendy Behrens is the Gifted and Talented Education Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Education. She presents frequently on the nature and needs of gifted learners, instructional strategies, service design, and policies that support highly able learners. She has co-authored several books and is an invited speaker in the United States, Middle East, Far East, and Europe. She is President of the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted, a CEC-TAG Board Member, delegate to the World Council, and an advisor for the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University and the Grayson School.


 

 

230 What’s a girl to do? Popular culture and the aspirations of rural gifted girls.
Parallel Session, G&T

The relationship between gifted adolescent girls in rural settings and popular culture is understudied in Australian and global contexts. The impact of the images, texts, and role models constantly presented in popular culture on their aspirations and the messages they receive about career choices, goals, and personal futures are important to understand in a world where girls continue to be positioned in traditional roles. The model described in this presentation highlights the necessity of providing gifted adolescent rural girls with skills, role models, and real life experiences to broaden their world view and construct their vision of a talented woman.

Denise Wood
Charles Sturt University
Australia

Dr Denise Wood has had an extensive teaching career in rural NSW, Australia across early childhood, primary and tertiary education. Her initial study in the area of gifted education began a deep interest in the field that has become a key focus of her work across the education sectors. In 2015, Denise completed her thesis explored that the impact of popular culture on the talent development of rural gifted adolescent girls. She is continuing to explore further perspectives on the lived experiences of gifted adolescent girls, and in rural and regional gifted education.


 

 

218 When Policy is not enough: One advocate’s perspective
Parallel Session, Advocacy

An experienced look through the eyes of one advocate at policy development and implementation in one jurisdiction in Australia. It answers the question of how to enhance your skills and reputation as an advocate.This explores ways the way government has supported the implementation of policy to enhance the experience of gifted students. It focuses on changes in the education choices of gifted children. Finally, it reviews individual school adaptations due to the policy.

Elizabeth Singer
ACT Gifted Families Support Group
Australia

I became involved in gifted education when my son was identified as gifted. Then became involved in support networks for parents of gifted children. Served a term as the President of the ACT Parents and Citizens Council, then a President of ACT Gifted Families Support Group.


 

 

165 When the World is Just Too Rough: Twice Exceptional Gifted Children with Sensory Processing Disorder
Parallel Session, 2e

Many gifted children demonstrate behaviors that interfere with daily functioning. Unfortunately, mental health evaluations sometimes fail to identify the expected attention, behavioral, or developmental disorders that these symptoms would typically indicate. A regularly overlooked diagnosis is Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), a neurological disorder that results in atypical reactions to sensory information. A pilot study showed that while the prevalence rate for SPD is 5% among the general population of children, the prevalence among gifted children is 35%. This presentation will review the research on SPD among gifted children found in the gifted education, special education, occupational therapy, and medical literature.

Yee Han Chu
University of North Dakota
United States

Yee Han Chu graduated with a BAS from the University of California, Davis, in 1991 with double majors in Psychology and Genetics, a MSSW in 1995, concentrating in Advanced Clinical Social Work, from Columbia University School of Social Work, New York, and a PhD in 2014 from the Department of Teaching and Learning at UND with emphasis on higher education. Her research agenda is to advance understanding of the educational, social, and emotional vulnerabilities of high ability children and to broaden the scope of social work advocacy to assist this population of children.

Bradley Myers
University of North Dakota
United States

Bradley Myers is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Randy H. Lee Professor at the University of North Dakota School of Law. He is also a North Dakota Commissioner to the Uniform Law Commission. Professor Myers joined faculty at the University of North Dakota in 2001. Professor Myers received his J.D. from the University of Oregon and his LL.M. in Taxation from New York University. In the area of gifted education Professor Myers focuses on the areas of legal uniformity and the right to an appropriate education.


 

 

240 Which gifted students are more likely to become disengaged from regular secondary education? An analysis of learning profiles
Parallel Session, 2e

This study examines the learning characteristics of gifted adolescents in years 9 to 10 who become disengaged from regular school. It is often proposed they display high creativity. The study compared their creative thinking profiles with those of peers who remained in regular classrooms and those who stayed in their school but not in their class. The profiles comprised non-verbal and verbal ability, sequential processing, creative ideation, and creative thinking. The three cohorts differed in their profiles. Those disengaged from school differed in all aspects except sequential processing. The findings help teachers assist gifted students who might become disengaged.

John Munro
Australian Catholic University
Australia

Dr Munro is Professor of Educational Psychology and Exceptional Learning in the Faculty of Arts and Education, Australian Catholic University. He is a qualified primary and secondary teacher and a psychologist. His teaching and research interests are in gifted education, literacy and math learning and learning difficulties, instructional leadership, school improvement and learning internationally. He has written state and national curricula in Australia. He has produced a range of teacher resources and professional learning materials for the state and independent school systems. He has provided consultancy to several international education projects including the Aga Khan Academies and the International Baccalaureate.